My teacher is pretty bad, is there any advice how I teach myself the subject. Watch

mctruffle
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#1
Hey, I'm currently studying a2 history. My teacher from last year retired and my new teacher is nowhere nearly as good. I've finished one module of the course and I honestly feel as if I've learnt nothing and that I have no idea what to revise/ answer exam questions. I am going to start self teaching the subject by reading around the various topics and making my own revision notes for the exams.

I did well at history last year getting an A and ideally I would like to do the same again this year. Advice from others who have self-taught a subject would be appreciated.

Thank you
0
reply
Ripper-Roo
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#2
Report 6 years ago
#2
Report her to your head teacher/governors, get your parents to complain? This isn't on

Download past papers and examiners reports, buy a revision guide for your topic, do you have any friends in your class you'd be happy to discuss the subject with and test each other, mark each others papers etc. You can't be the only one feeling like this
0
reply
AndrewGrace
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#3
Report 6 years ago
#3
which topic would you be self-teaching?, also does this particular exam board have a coursework module? (if so may require external marking)

The course textbook is always a good place to start, but do acquire other textbooks and additional reading aswell

Get the past papers and do the questions and get your teacher to mark them (if not post them on here and someone will mark them (plenty of ex-A-level/University students are capable of doing so)
0
reply
AndrewGrace
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#4
Report 6 years ago
#4
Also personally unless instructed to peer-mark as part of an in class exercise, i would avoid doing so as often peer-marking becomes very subjective and elements of the mark scheme are misunderstood
0
reply
Sapphirez50
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#5
Report 6 years ago
#5
Definitely go to the Head of the History Department and explain. Also, see if anyone else in the class feels the same way as you, a group of students not learning won't be ignored.

I have recently got the same problem with my Biology teacher. She's nice and easy to talk to, but, when it comes to teaching or answering a question - I feel even more confused. I've begun teaching myself the new topic by reading through the textbook and taking notes in class whilst she goes on about her life stories and shows us optical illusions - since, we're learning about the brain, so...pictures that mess with your eyes are always fun (!) :confused:
0
reply
mctruffle
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#6
Hey, I really don't see much point in complaining as she can't be replaced this late in the year and it would only create bad blood between the class. I've just got to make the best of a bad situation. I've got my EPQ going at the moment which I hope to finish by the end of Christmas and then starting from next year I'm going to read the history books in my library and make revision notes. I'm not sure whether it's the jump from AS to A2 but I honestly feel as if I've only got a scathing overview of the topics (the same thing has happened in geography) and that I could never properly answer a question. Thanks for the advice on posting essays up on tsr, I've done that before but not as much as I would have liked.

Unfortunately history never seems to have 1 set text book, or never has one that goes into the appropriate level of detail, so I will have to get information from a range of them. I suppose this will be beneficial for university, though it shouldn't really happen, and will get me more acquainted with the historiography.

Thanks again.
0
reply
AndrewGrace
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#7
Report 6 years ago
#7
Yeah i would really ignore the advice re. complaining about the teacher, as it will not go down to well within the department if you don't have an extremely good reason to do so

What you will find is that at AS and A2 alot of the focus is on you to do the work and the teacher is just there in the backdrop

what topic is it you are doing by the way?
0
reply
mctruffle
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#8
Nazis and Britain in austerity (basically the 1930's, Jarrow crusade that sort of stuff) and British foreign policy 1880-1980.
0
reply
Hal.E.Lujah
  • Study Helper
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#9
Report 6 years ago
#9
Heya - Self taught for 7 A levels here and got full marks in all of them (history included) except one.



The trick is to find out the syllabus and marks schemes, your teacher should at least be able to provide that. You can then procure the correct textbooks, work through them making notes, and basically try to get as much background knowledge as you can to relate to what the examiners are looking for. You'd also benefit massively from looking at example essays, from any source you can get them.

On TSR we have a great study help section, and you can hopefully find people to give you good feedback on your essays and points if you post them here. At A level I'm pretty sure the actual learning normally comes in revision form anyway, so you should do really well from this style of learning.


Just going to say, don't waste time reporting the teacher or anything, nobody really cares.
0
reply
mctruffle
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#10
The mark schemes that I've seen are pretty vague and generally cover how to write an essay rather than what to write. I've been thinking, the essays that I've seen on past papers have all basically been variants of the same essay. Would it be advisable to just get the necessary content to answer the variants of that essay? It seems pretty risky but I'm not quite sure how I would structure my note taking otherwise unless I did it according to the module scheme that we've been given.
0
reply
mayamiller
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#11
Report 6 years ago
#11
I dont know how far away your exam is but i'll let you know one thing. I've personally gone through this with my chem teacher and lemme tell you i always regret because i had to re-sit and i'm still waiting for results. but i'm more hopeful now because the first things i did were:
1.never depend on a teacher or the school.
2. Go to your examining body website, research the latest textbooks for it e.t.c cos revising from a wrong or outdated source is something we all do and is unacceptable at this level
3. Buy it no matter how expensive because the hairless, stress agony and waiting you'll have over the few months before results will pale the price in comparison
4.Read day and night....live and breath your books. I sometimes stay up till 3.30 reading...(future med student ) you dont have to do that but u get the picture. DO WHAT NEEDS TO BE DONE. the end is justice to the means
5.inbox message/reply to me if you found this helpful and wanna know more or if anything was unclear....

trust me, just be the innovative abt this and you will reap the rewards
0
reply
mctruffle
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#12
My exams are in June but I want to start preparing for them after Christmas.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Warwick
    Warwick Business School Postgraduate
    Thu, 20 Feb '20
  • St George's, University of London
    Postgrad open day Postgraduate
    Thu, 20 Feb '20
  • University of Hertfordshire
    All Subjects Undergraduate
    Sat, 22 Feb '20

People at uni: do initiations (like heavy drinking) put you off joining sports societies?

Yes (228)
67.66%
No (109)
32.34%

Watched Threads

View All