North Korea and Medium-Range Nuclear Missiles - a winning combination Watch

brimstone
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#21
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#21
:eek: Wowee, special ones
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Agent Smith
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#22
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#22
(Original post by aiman)
I don't think they will ignore it at all. It's legally binding.
A failure to follow the resolution results in action from the SC (military, that is).
What's to stop the DPRK simply leaving the UN? It's not as if there's much in it for them if they stay.
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aiman
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#23
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What's to stop the DPRK simply leaving the UN? It's not as if there's much in it for them if they stay.
Nothing I suppose.
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Agent Smith
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#24
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#24
The Bhutan suddenly wishes we hadn't said that...
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aiman
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#25
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The Bhutan suddenly wishes we hadn't said that...
Well, truly, leaving the UN wouldn't be the wisest move by Kim Jong. It is true that N.Korea suffers being part of the UN, but simply leaving the UN wouldn't change that. We, the SC that is, could still form resolutions on N. Korea and force all the member nations to follow them.
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Agent Smith
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#26
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#26
True. But our thinking was more on the lines that the DPRK might do the old Richard III thing - "the rest that love me, rise and follow me" - and take a whole load of other rogue states out of the UN with them.
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Nefarious
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#27
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Tonga believes The Bhutan has found the crux of the whole problem. When dealing with a nuclear armed state all stick and no significant carrot isn't going to work.
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aiman
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#28
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True. But our thinking was more on the lines that the DPRK might do the old Richard III thing - "the rest that love me, rise and follow me" - and take a whole load of other rogue states out of the UN with them.
Yes, but the crux of the matter is, who really likes the DPRK? Not even China and Russia seem to like the DPRK. If the DPRK was popular...then yes, but I can't see many (significant) nations leaving as the DPRK is just a wild bomb.
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Agent Smith
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#29
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#29
But what does the DPRK want? Any international aid, foodwise or otherwise (in an effort to stop them starving even more of their own citizens), will be seen, and portrayed, as external interference, if not a US plot. And the only other thing they are likely to want is weaponry, which is precisely what they cannot be allowed to have.
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Agent Smith
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#30
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(Original post by aiman)
Yes, but the crux of the matter is, who really likes the DPRK? Not even China and Russia seem to like the DPRK. If the DPRK was popular...then yes, but I can't see many (significant) nations leaving as the DPRK is just a wild bomb.
Iran might, and that would represent some serious back-to-square-one material in terms of diplomacy. 'Nam might, although they've been quite quiet of late.
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aiman
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#31
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Tonga believes The Bhutan has found the crux of the whole problem. When dealing with a nuclear armed state all stick and no significant carrot isn't going to work.
We wish that were true. The problem simply arises from the fact that the N. Koreans don't want to declare any intentions. Even Iran went on to say, 'We don't want nuclear arms, we're want nuclear energy'.
We had been quite busy with N. Korea before it left the six-way talks. Back then, Kim Jong was being pretty ambigious, but he sort of mentioned that N. Korea is using its nuclear program for energy purposes (which is evidently wrong, in the light of recent events). Back then, the 'six' offered a highly lucrative energy plan to the DPRK (better than the one we offered Iran), but we didn't see any positive feedback.
Another concern that we have is the tendency to break agreements. Back in 1994, six nations, including N. Korea signed on to an agreement saying that they would not work towards long-range weapons. But once again, N.Korea has broken that.
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Agent Smith
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#32
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That may well all be true, but does it advance things? We need to present a united front on the issue, and we need some ideas on how to defuse the DPRK.

Well, we say "we", but what we mean is "you", because the Bhutan's not exactly going to be the strongest voice at the negotiating table.
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Nightowl
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#33
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#33
Nothing to stop the DPRK leaving the UN, there is something to stop teehar letting the DPRK leave the UN.
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Knogle
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#34
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I'm not sure if any of you have read the latest edition of The Economist, but if you haven't, please do. It has a short 3-4page write-up on the DPRK nuclear issue.

Basically, North Korea wants to be treated like Iran. Iran is at the centre of the world's attention. Iran has repeatedly been given huge packages of incentives for it to cease its nuclear programme -- and the only reason this has happened is because Iran continues to provoke and stretch boundaries. If you recall, Iran has also launched a couple of ballistic missiles in recent times (the Shihab-* model IIRC). North Korea wants exactly that. It knows that its economy cannot survive without foreign intervention and aid.. and the only way it can get that (in a timely manner without much need for words) is to blackmail the world.

We must all agree not to engage North Korea in direct talks, to prevent the regime from playing each of us out against one another.

We must all strongly urge China, one of the DPRK's strongest allies, to condemn the launch of the missiles. China is one of the biggest contributors of aid to the regime, and if China takes a tough stance on the issue, the DPRK will get the message.
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Agent Smith
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#35
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#35
Will it now. You're assuming that the government of the DPRK is passably sane, which may not be the case.
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brimstone
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#36
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(Original post by Agent Smith)
Will it now. You're assuming that the government of the DPRK is passably sane, which may not be the case.
Especially when it's being represented by teehar
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Cataclysm
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#37
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The Switzerland does condemn these tests and feels that is a step in the wrong direction for the peace in the international community. However we cannot just impose sanctions on North Korea and expect them to comply, if they were to conform to rules these tests wouldn't have happened in the first place.

Military action against NK should be considered but not acted upon . We must remember that they won't go down without a fight and no doubt there will be unrest amongst many nations. It would be better if we host diplomatic talks with representatives -- it's the only way to diffuse this situation peacefully. Switzerland fully supports and agrees with the US, UK, France and Japan.

On a different note: I read that some of the missiles that NK is testing are capable of reaching Alaska, [out of character] I would recommend that the people there grab a tin hat and a bible[/out of character].
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Knogle
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#38
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(Original post by aiman)
We are offering N.Korea one-on-one talks.
Really? I thought the US was vehemently against this. Why the change of opinion?
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Knogle
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#39
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(Original post by Cataclysm)
The Switzerland does condemn these tests and feels that is a step in the wrong direction for the peace in the international community. However we cannot just impose sanctions on North Korea and expect them to comply, if they were to conform to rules these tests wouldn't have happened in the first place.

Military action against NK should be considered but not acted upon . We must remember that they won't go down without a fight and no doubt there will be unrest amongst many nations. It would be better if we host diplomatic talks with representatives -- it's the only way to diffuse this situation peacefully. Switzerland fully supports and agrees with the US, UK, France and Japan.

On a different note: I read that some of the missiles that NK is testing are capable of reaching Alaska, [out of character] I would recommend that the people there grab a tin hat and a bible[/out of character].
Reminds me of Free Willy. Where somehow, the whales and the seals (which Alaska has plenty of) are gonna be the heroes who save the people. :p:
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aiman
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#40
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Really? I thought the US was vehemently against this. Why the change of opinion?
We want to take diplomacy to its fullest.
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