Caloric intake Watch

tomtjl
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
So today I decided, on a whim, to measure my calorie and protein intake. Now, my BMR is approx 1900 and using a calculator, my daily caloric intake should be around 2900 calories.

Now, today I went to the gym (did full body work out plus some light cardio at the end) and so far (it's 9pm) my intake has been as such; Calories: 2172, Protein: 162.7g

I'm wondering if this will affect me at all? I'm trying to lose some belly fat and moobs while putting on a bit of muscle, but I'm wondering if the lack of calories will cause me to not put on as much muscle? As you can see, I have eaten plenty of protein (I way approx 174lbs/79kgs) but I was wondering how much the lack of calories will affect me.

Thanks.
0
reply
Scoobiedoobiedo
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 years ago
#2
You aren't going to lose fat and gain muscle at the same time. Focus on one, commit to it, and you'll get far better results.
0
reply
Kerch
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#3
Report 5 years ago
#3
(Original post by Scoobiedoobiedo)
You aren't going to lose fat and gain muscle at the same time. Focus on one, commit to it, and you'll get far better results.
I see this bulking and cutting strategy as something more for intermediate/advanced bodybuilders. Real beginners, i.e. people who are very weak, overweight, or both, can lose fat and gain muscle initially because they are so far from their maximum potential.
0
reply
Scoobiedoobiedo
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#4
Report 5 years ago
#4
(Original post by Kerch)
I see this bulking and cutting strategy as something more for intermediate/advanced bodybuilders. Real beginners, i.e. people who are very weak, overweight, or both, can lose fat and gain muscle initially because they are so far from their maximum potential.
I think the whole noob muscle gain and simultaneous fat loss thing is really exaggerated. Generally speaking, although there are certain exceptions, you need to be in a deficit to lose body fat. Even with noob gains, you aren't gaining any appreciable muscle in a caloric deficit.

The 'I lost fat and gained muscle' anecdotes, in my opinion, are just people slightly misunderstanding what is happening.

If an untrained individual starts weight lifting, even in a caloric deficit they're going to get stronger, both in terms of their musculature and their CNS. I think a lot of begginers confuse getting stronger with gaining muscle, when in actual fact they aren't one in the same.

Also, if you start losing body fat, you become more defined. As you lose body fat and become more defined, you obviously look more muscular, which again probably confuses people into thinking they've gained muscle and lost fat simultaneously. In actuality they didn't, they just striped off the fat to reveal the muscle.

It's fair to say that you can reduce body fat percentage while gaining muscle, but I don't think a beginner is losing actual body fat and gaining actual muscle at the same time.

Also, you have to consider that 99.999% of beginners don't have a perfect routine or a perfect diet, and they definitely don't have both in combination, at least not consistently.

Generally they aren't getting the most out of muscle gain or fat loss in isolation, and so even if it were technically possible to do both at the same time, in reality it isn't.
0
reply
tomtjl
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#5
(Original post by Scoobiedoobiedo)
I think the whole noob muscle gain and simultaneous fat loss thing is really exaggerated. Generally speaking, although there are certain exceptions, you need to be in a deficit to lose body fat. Even with noob gains, you aren't gaining any appreciable muscle in a caloric deficit.

The 'I lost fat and gained muscle' anecdotes, in my opinion, are just people slightly misunderstanding what is happening.

If an untrained individual starts weight lifting, even in a caloric deficit they're going to get stronger, both in terms of their musculature and their CNS. I think a lot of begginers confuse getting stronger with gaining muscle, when in actual fact they aren't one in the same.

Also, if you start losing body fat, you become more defined. As you lose body fat and become more defined, you obviously look more muscular, which again probably confuses people into thinking they've gained muscle and lost fat simultaneously. In actuality they didn't, they just striped off the fat to reveal the muscle.

It's fair to say that you can reduce body fat percentage while gaining muscle, but I don't think a beginner is losing actual body fat and gaining actual muscle at the same time.

Also, you have to consider that 99.999% of beginners don't have a perfect routine or a perfect diet, and they definitely don't have both in combination, at least not consistently.

Generally they aren't getting the most out of muscle gain or fat loss in isolation, and so even if it were technically possible to do both at the same time, in reality it isn't.
Well what I'm thinking is that if I keep eating at a caloric deficit, and keep going to the gym and have a decent amount of protein, won't I lose fat and build muscle?
0
reply
Scoobiedoobiedo
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#6
Report 5 years ago
#6
(Original post by tomtjl)
Well what I'm thinking is that if I keep eating at a caloric deficit, and keep going to the gym and have a decent amount of protein, won't I lose fat and build muscle?
You'll lose fat and maintain what muscle you have, or at least most of it.

If I were you I would focus on losing fat. If you focus on it you'll lose more of it, faster. Once you've lost as much fat as you want to lose, then you can focus on building muscle.

Building muscle requires a surplus of calories, losing fat requires a deficit. You can't be in a surplus and a deficit at the same time.

If you really want to try and do both at the same time, you could try and re-comp. Look up 'The Ultimate Diet 2.0"
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Which party will you be voting for in the General Election?

Conservatives (194)
18.8%
Labour (531)
51.45%
Liberal Democrats (140)
13.57%
Green Party (57)
5.52%
Brexit Party (15)
1.45%
Independent Group for Change (Change UK) (4)
0.39%
SNP (16)
1.55%
Plaid Cymru (5)
0.48%
Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) (0)
0%
Sinn Fein (7)
0.68%
SDLP (1)
0.1%
Ulster Unionist (4)
0.39%
UKIP (11)
1.07%
Other (10)
0.97%
None (37)
3.59%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed