Why would anyone buy a dangerous dog? Watch

russellsteapot
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#1
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...dogs-home.html

Another person killed by their own pet, which sits alongside dozens of other cases of people being killed/seriously injured by their own dogs or dogs owned by the family, and they're often children. The overwhelming majority of these cases involve a small handful of very aggressive breeds. A few more recent ones:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...thers-dog.html
http://www.itv.com/news/story/2013-1...fter-dog-bite/

I suppose the question is, are people stupid or just irresponsible? Why would you buy a big, aggressive dog in the first place, especially when you have very young children?

There is of course the argument that it's 'poor training' or some other factor that makes dogs attack people. Or they were surprised. Or annoyed. Or stressed. And usually that big slavering dog that was bred for dog fighting is actually lovely. But it's still an animal, and you can't really guarantee that you've socially conditioned the aggression out of a dog in a single generation. And ultimately, it's the same breeds appearing again and again in every story, and the majority do seem to be well cared-for family pets rather than status dogs. No doubt there'll be lots of aggressive breed owners who insist their pet is a lovely little harmless lamb who has assured them it's a veggie and eats nothing but tofu sandwiches, but it probably isn't. And it could probably snap at any time, like any other animal.

It just confuses me a little bit; if you really want a dog, why not buy a slightly nicer breed? Especially if you have young kids. It doesn't seem worth the risk of buying a powerful, aggressive meat-eater to frolic around with your toddler. Obviously some people like the status of a big angry-looking dog but really is there any other point? And is it worth risking your child's life? Get a little Pomeranian or something.
0
reply
Angry cucumber
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 6 years ago
#2
Status - having a big scary dog gives some people in some places a status upon them

Also: Dog fighting,"Cool" and naivety
0
reply
the bear
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#3
Report 6 years ago
#3
it is usually an underclass family who have these dreadful killer dogs. it is a status symbol on their ghastly estates. then they go all sad and blamy when Tyson or Crusher eats their offspring.
1
reply
LukeM90
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#4
Report 6 years ago
#4
to look hard,

security/safety purposes,

They own a fast food outlet that serves kebabs
0
reply
Aj12
  • Political Ambassador
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#5
Report 6 years ago
#5
I'm not sure the problem is dog breeds. More stupid people leaving children alone with dogs. No matter how cute and cuddly an animal is if a child pulls its tail or sits on the dog you cannot be sure how the dog will react. I'd never leave a child with any dog no matter how friendly or well natured it is.
2
reply
It's****ingWOODY
  • Political Ambassador
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#6
Report 6 years ago
#6
To look 'ard.
0
reply
Mackay
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#7
Report 6 years ago
#7
It's usually the same type of people who buy them. People called Gaz who try to accentuate their scummy image by taking an absolute baby-mauler of a hound.
0
reply
2ndClass
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#8
Report 6 years ago
#8
Pitbulls aren't inherently dangerous dogs, they're bred that way by stupid owners. I personally want to buy a Doberman when I get older.
0
reply
SpicyStrawberry
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#9
Report 6 years ago
#9
Not completely related but it does amuse me when I see people walking down the street with a Staffie thinking they're hard, they are one of the dopiest softest breeds I've ever come across, people just assume they are nasty because they resemble Pitbulls. Having said that, it's about the owner more than it is the breed IMO, you can teach any breed to be aggressive if you try hard enough. I wouldn't trust any dog to be alone with a small child, nevermind breeds you would consider to be dangerous.
0
reply
ESPORTIVA
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#10
Report 6 years ago
#10
What's a dangerous dog?
1
reply
Thetruth13
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#11
Report 6 years ago
#11
This is ridiculous, the breed of the dog has absolutely nothing to do with it its 100% down to the owner. How many people have had there ankles snapped at by a little Yorkshire terrier or chihuahua type dog compared to the amount of people that have ACTUALLY been snapped at by a big dog. And pit bulls or Rottweilers aren't the only dogs responsible for deaths what about the many deaths labradors, german shepherds or mastiffs have caused? One dog is no more violent over another its just the different sizes obviously add more power to a dog.
1
reply
Chlorophile
  • Study Helper
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#12
Report 6 years ago
#12
Probably because they're insecure and feel the need to have an intimidating dog to toughen themselves up.
0
reply
littlesmurfette
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#13
Report 6 years ago
#13
(Original post by Thetruth13)
This is ridiculous, the breed of the dog has absolutely nothing to do with it its 100% down to the owner. How many people have had there ankles snapped at by a little Yorkshire terrier or chihuahua type dog compared to the amount of people that have ACTUALLY been snapped at by a big dog. And pit bulls or Rottweilers aren't the only dogs responsible for deaths what about the many deaths labradors, german shepherds or mastiffs have caused? One dog is no more violent over another its just the different sizes obviously add more power to a dog.
Agree. I got a Jack Russell for a birthday present in February and she is the loveliest, dopiest thing. Given lots of love and attention, rarely left and look after and trained properly. She lives with my parents at the moment unfortunately.
The guy two doors down from my parents got one from the same litter. It had to be put down last week because it jumped into a babies pram and bit it. Guy didn't look after it- and his way of telling him not to do things was booting him down a flight of stairs. He wasn't doing it to be malicious- in fact he is a lovely guy- just incredibly naive.

They are clever things- and like humans, they learn by example. Act aggressive towards it and expect it to act like that to other people.
0
reply
Bill_Gates
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#14
Report 6 years ago
#14
to make up for a small willy
0
reply
Bill_Gates
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#15
Report 6 years ago
#15
(Original post by the bear)
it is usually an underclass family who have these dreadful killer dogs. it is a status symbol on their ghastly estates. then they go all sad and blamy when Tyson or Crusher eats their offspring.
Is that you David Attenborough?
0
reply
Mackay
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#16
Report 6 years ago
#16
(Original post by Bill_Gates)
Is that you David Attenborough?
Hahaha.
0
reply
Changing Skies
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#17
Report 6 years ago
#17
I agree that it isn't solely down to the owner. As mentioned, it's ALWAYS the same breeds that end up mauling people to death, with the odd exception. I have 6 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels and it would be extremely unlikely that any owner would be able to turn them into a pack of aggressive dogs; they just don't have it in them. This is the same for many breeds. It's no coincidence that breeds such as pitbulls are commonly responsible for aggression. I think that the owner is simply responsible for bringing the aggression out of the breed, so it's a combination of both.

Posted from TSR Mobile
1
reply
Buberries
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#18
Report 6 years ago
#18
Do you think that is because a certain type of people go for these breeds?

Would anyone who wishes to appear tough and wants to own a big aggressive dog buy a Yorkshire terrier? Think about it a bit.

From personal experience, it's a load of crap that some breeds are just aggressive! I have nursed a pitbull terrier when I worked with one of the local animal charities back in Spain. She was the sweetest thing.
0
reply
Extremotroph
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#19
Report 6 years ago
#19
(Original post by littlesmurfette)
Agree. I got a Jack Russell for a birthday present in February and she is the loveliest, dopiest thing. Given lots of love and attention, rarely left and look after and trained properly. She lives with my parents at the moment unfortunately.
The guy two doors down from my parents got one from the same litter. It had to be put down last week because it jumped into a babies pram and bit it. Guy didn't look after it- and his way of telling him not to do things was booting him down a flight of stairs. He wasn't doing it to be malicious- in fact he is a lovely guy- just incredibly naive.

They are clever things- and like humans, they learn by example. Act aggressive towards it and expect it to act like that to other people.
Kicking an animal down a flight of stairs is not the characteristic of a "lovely guy", seems you're being duped.
0
reply
0le
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#20
Report 6 years ago
#20
I think there needs to be more stringent rules before you can own a dog. Clearly, some owners don't know how to discipline their dogs.

(Original post by littlesmurfette)
Guy didn't look after it- and his way of telling him not to do things was booting him down a flight of stairs. He wasn't doing it to be malicious- in fact he is a lovely guy- just incredibly naive.
Don't try and give him pity. He is an idiot and can't be a lovely guy if that is how he disciplines a dog, regardless of however you try and spin it. I hope you layed into him, because that is pathetic. That is a huge reason why these dogs are aggressive. Stupid owners. Not always, but in many cases.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

People at uni: do initiations (like heavy drinking) put you off joining sports societies?

Yes (422)
67.41%
No (204)
32.59%

Watched Threads

View All