Would bedwetting be classed as a medical reason for having a private bathroom at uni? Watch

TKR
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#21
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erm who would be taking their sheets to the bathroom?

as people have said you piss the bed you piss the bed the location of the toilet is irrelevant entirely
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shady lane
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#22
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(Original post by more adventurous)
Why would you be carrying your piss-stained sheets to the bathroom anyway?
Because laundry costs money, plus the machines may be full.

I don't know about all of you but when I get a serious stain in my clothes, I take it to the nearest sink immediately to wash out what I can before I put it in the laundry. Hand scrubbing is still the best way to get things out.
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random_bloke
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#23
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(Original post by TKR)
erm who would be taking their sheets to the bathroom?

as people have said you piss the bed you piss the bed the location of the toilet is irrelevant entirely
you'd have to ring the sheets out...and they would smell....you would have to go to the bathroom with them.

Why does the OP just not go en-suite...problem solved!
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AT82
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#24
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#24
You need to speak to your university about this, I don't think it will be a problem, bladder problems can be extremely complicated, so it dosn't surprise me the condition you have.

Hopefully most people at university will be mature enough to understand it, but lets hope it never comes to that in the first place.

It does seem however you also need to have special arrangements with regard to luandery and with the new disability laws your university can't really refuse.
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Barny
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#25
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I assume if you wet the bed you'd take quite a few sets of sheets with you, so that when it happens, you just replace them, and wash them in the morning. Whether you have an en-suite room or not is irrelevant.
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AT82
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#26
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#26
(Original post by x.narb.x)
I assume if you wet the bed you'd take quite a few sets of sheets with you, so that when it happens, you just replace them, and wash them in the morning. Whether you have an en-suite room or not is irrelevant.
If you wet your bed you might want to have a shower etc, you will stink, you don't really want to go down the corriders while in this condition. I know where you are coming from but just imagine how you would feel if you had this condition.
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kateykat
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#27
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(Original post by AT82)
If you wet your bed you might want to have a shower etc, you will stink, you don't really want to go down the corriders while in this condition. I know where you are coming from but just imagine how you would feel if you had this condition.
Yep that's my way of thinking too. I think people are taking bed-wetting too light-heartedly on this thread, it must be a terrible thing to have to deal with. The OP's bed-wetting may be caused by either mental or physical problems; if it's the latter then it would be easier for him/her to get to the loo during the night if he/she has an ensuite bathroom.
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El Scotto
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#28
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Please could anybody tell me whether if I told my university I'm going to that I wet the bed, and got a note from my doctor, whether they would give me a private bathroom? It's the main thing I'm worrying about

This should be in the university forum but you cannot post anonymously there.

Ya dont need a private bathroom if you're using the bed surely... : )

Im sure if you gave them the letter they'd organise something.
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belis
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#29
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belis ^, which is why its not absolutely necesary - it would make me more comfortable though. I'd worry a lot less.
I understand that. I was just trying to reasure you that if for any reason you do not get a privet bathroom you should still be able to manage your problem in a discreet way. I would imagine that you will need to take your bedding to the loundry anyway as it can not be washed properly in the sink. It is a metter of having a showever then and that should not be a problem.

I can perfectly understand how self concious all that must make you feel (and some of the remarks in this thread are not helping much) but as long as you removed soked pj none is going to smell urine on you or have any other way of telling what has happened (I assume that it may be what you are worried about). Maybe I take it all to lightly as I have to deal with incontinence a lot (I work as a nursing auxiliary)...

To sum up. If it worries you and you feel like en suit room will make you less stressed about the issue then it is definitely worth writing to uni. Make sure you enclose supporting letter from your GP. If they cannot get you ensuit maybe at least a sink in your room (if you think that could help in some way, like let you rinse your bedding or have a quick wash down before hading for the showers).
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glance
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#30
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I'd say it would be a definite reason for having a private bathroom.
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Ghost
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#31
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To all those who say you could just carry the sheets to the bathroom and sort them out, you obviously havent thought it through! Pee soaked sheets stink to the high heavens, and would drip everywhere. The whole house would smell like pee the next morning. Allt he best to the OP, I dont think you'll have a problem getting the en-suite you require.
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SugarExplosion
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#32
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#32
I think the main problem would be that if he/she woke up in the middle of the night and it had happened, that they'd like the be able to deal with the situation privately, and therefore having a shower would be better. This would avoid the "why are you going for a shower at 4:30 in the morning?" questions from your housemates I'd easily say it was a good enough reason, universities just want to make you as comfortable as possible. Get a doctors note, write off to the uni and enjoy your ensuite
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saoirse
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#33
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God, some of the replies are so flip...

I think its definately a valid reason for a private bathroom, you would need that facility to sort yourself out with a bit of dignity if you wet the bed
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Profesh
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#34
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#34
(Original post by Anonymous)
Please could anybody tell me whether if I told my university I'm going to that I wet the bed, and got a note from my doctor, whether they would give me a private bathroom? It's the main thing I'm worrying about

This should be in the university forum but you cannot post anonymously there.
Adopt something absorbent and hermetically-sealed in lieu of underwear; a nappy, for instance.

I'm not even being sarcastic. Is no-one here even remotely capable of thinking laterally; or, I daresay, logically?
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saoirse
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#35
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A nappy? Dont be so insulting! The OP perhaps only wets the bed once a week or something. Can you imagine when the fire alarm goes off at 3am, standing outside halls with the nappy rustling away with only light pjs to conceal it?! The shame!

Theres more tactful ways of managing this
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Ethereal
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#36
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#36
(Original post by AT82)
You need to speak to your university about this, I don't think it will be a problem, bladder problems can be extremely complicated, so it dosn't surprise me the condition you have.

Hopefully most people at university will be mature enough to understand it, but lets hope it never comes to that in the first place.

It does seem however you also need to have special arrangements with regard to luandery and with the new disability laws your university can't really refuse.
That's not strictly true. Intermitent bed wetting probably won't fall within the definition of a Disbaility under the terms of the DDA. Even if it does, the DDA only requires reasoable adjustment, which in this case would be a single room.
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Profesh
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#37
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#37
(Original post by saoirse)
A nappy? Dont be so insulting! The OP perhaps only wets the bed once a week or something. Can you imagine when the fire alarm goes off at 3am, standing outside halls with the nappy rustling away with only light pjs to conceal it?! The shame!
Perhaps; perhaps not: however, I remain (thankfully) un-acquainted with the precise chronology or scheduling of his nocturnal emissions, so yours is a moot point. Not wholly unlike my (real and quite palpable) concern as to whether or not you even know what a 'dressing-gown' is.

Theres more tactful ways of managing this
Evidently, I have committed what can only be adequately described as a cardinal sin in holding the thread-starter's comfort and (fiscal) convenience (not to mention, that of anyone with whom he might wish to associate) paramount over a vague and fatuous notion of 'tact'. I trust, only that you will pay heed to my most humble contrition; and perhaps, concordantly, find it in your heart to forgive.
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Tarts_n_Vicars
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#38
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Won't the bed be saturated too not just the sheets? (unless you have those hospital grade plastic bed covers). Maybe a twin room with two beds so you could alternate. They have them at my uni and they're not that much more than a regular room.
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bedbug
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#39
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#39
(Original post by Tarts_n_Vicars)
Won't the bed be saturated too not just the sheets? (unless you have those hospital grade plastic bed covers). Maybe a twin room with two beds so you could alternate. They have them at my uni and they're not that much more than a regular room.
Surely it's quite a mission to assign everyone rooms though with the amount of accommodation they have (it seems to be that case at most unis from what I gather) so they wouldn't want to give one person space that could be used for two people.
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Tarts_n_Vicars
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#40
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#40
(Original post by squirly)
Surely it's quite a mission to assign everyone rooms though with the amount of accommodation they have (it seems to be that case at most unis from what I gather) so they wouldn't want to give one person space that could be used for two people.
Yes but if the bedwetting is to be used to sway the decision so the OP gets an ensuite room and the problem is that the OP wets "the bed" rather than wetting the en suite then it might be in their best interests to provide an alternative bed.
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