I'm a Kurd from Iraq, ask me anything Watch

radiopred
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#21
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#21
(Original post by Peachykeen09)
i'm a racially ambiguous female from america, ask me anything
Ever heard of a kurd? State+city? What other countries have you been too?
0
reply
radiopred
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#22
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#22
(Original post by Reform)
Are you aware of what's going on in Syria?

Also, are you aware of the YPG (and the PKK) in Syria?
Yes I am aware of Syria.

First off the PKK, a stupid organisation in the view point of most Kurds. Just like Nelson Mandela was a member of the terrorist unit of the ANC and ordered over a dozen attacks killing multiple, the same goes for the leader of the PKK. However, Mandela did more right then wrong, and even admitted to his crimes (his jail sentence). They were/are both trying to get rid of Aparthidism, but the PKK is more about gaining power than equality which is why its hated. Bare in mind the PKK only formed due to the abuse and inequality among the Kurdish minority in Turkey (14 million people), where they couldn't even speak their own language. Most people including I are happy to see the PKK disabandonment as we don't agree with the principles, although Apartheid still exists. Mandela even rejected his peace prize by Turkey because of its human rights abuses and racism.

YPG formed towards the beginning of this year. Kurds refused to take part in the the Syrian Civil War for both the rebels and the state, and so they were innocently slaughtered. However, the rebels slaughtered and kidnapped hundreds and thousands of Kurds for this reason in the northern cities and Aleppo, and so it was necessary to prevent the innocent killing of Christians, Kurds and other minorities by the terrorist ridden rebels. The most important role of the YPG is to allow the safe passage of refugees into Iraq, there are over 200'000 Syrian Kurds in Iraq now, all paid for by the Kurdish Regional Government as the UN is only willing to help refugees in Turkey.

Whats your opinion of the two acronyms you mentioned?
2
reply
RoyalBlue7
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#23
Report 5 years ago
#23
Two questions...

1. Why did Saddam Hussein target Kurds, what do the Kurds think?
2. What's Yezidism? Something to do with a ruler?

And also the Kurds in Syria are supposed to be enjoying autonomous rule, with more independence, according to the news. So how come they are being forced into the war?

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
Einstein786
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#24
Report 5 years ago
#24
HEYY! Im a mixed Kurd from Iraq too! But my mothers ethnicity is actually Pakistani-quite a mixed person I'd love to go to Iraq again, I miss it. But my Grandparents and ancestors would be more of a Turkish background. Iraq is a lovely (relatively peaceful) place, people just don't know it!
0
reply
Mo_maths
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#25
Report 5 years ago
#25
(Original post by radiopred)
Some background below, feel free to skip it and ask a question :P

Firstly, what's a Kurd?

Kurds are an ethnic group, living in a region called Kurdistan, spanning Turkey, Iraq, Iran and Syria. There are also significant populations in Germany, Azerbaijan and Israel. The total population is approximately 35 million, with their own language, yes you guessed it, Kurdish

It used to be an empire, and now is a region. Upon the fall of the Ottoman Empire at the beginning of the 20th century, it was set out to become a country, but Turkey forcibly stopped that, at the same time of the Armenian Genocide. Its known for its unique dancing, songs and extravagant clothing.

So Kurdistan?

You may of heard of Kurds, from the genocide committed by Saddam Hussein. Currently the north of Iraq has an autonomous region, with its own government, but the other regions are still suffering.

In Turkey, until recently speaking Kurdish was illegal, and they are not allowed to be mentioned in Parliament. In Iran, silent executions go on every day, recently all Kurdish MPs walked out because all their funding for infrastructure was removed by Rouhanis government. In Syria, Kurds are being slaughtered along with the Christians by the rebels for not partaking in the war.

What about the Iraq war

The autonomous region of Iraq where Im from has its own army, and the number of forge in troops in the North numbered in the hundreds. 1000 people die each month in Iraq from terrorist attacks, but only three attacks have occurred since 2003 (start of the war) in the North, and almost all the violence is between the Sunnis and the Shias in the South. Trust me its safe (Ive been twice during the 'war')

As you can see below its quite a nice place, with mainly liberal views. All religions are accepted and its known for harbouring minorities, as well as alcohol and homosexuals being legal. Its economy is growing at unexpected rates, with 1000X more forgein firms operating in the North than the rest of Iraq.

ME

Im currently in University studying Engineering, born in Manchester. My parents were born in Iraq, and 90% of my family still lives there. Ive been back 4 times, and hoping to go back during the summer. Im from the city of Erbil, in the north of Iraq, and Ill attach a few photos of it below:




Ishlonek Habibi
0
reply
loveslinus
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#26
Report 5 years ago
#26
Have you heard of Gertrude Bell? If so what are your views on her/ her actions regarding the "Kurdish question"? (Or British imperialism in the region more generally?)
0
reply
radiopred
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#27
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#27
(Original post by StUdEnTIGCSE)
Two questions...

1. Why did Saddam Hussein target Kurds, what do the Kurds think?
2. What's Yezidism? Something to do with a ruler?

And also the Kurds in Syria are supposed to be enjoying autonomous rule, with more independence, according to the news. So how come they are being forced into the war?

Posted from TSR Mobile
1) It was essentially a mini-uprising, because of the inequality between kurds and arabs. There was no infrastructure spending, electricity, sewers, roads etc. There was an ethnic cleansing operation in Iraq at the time, so some Kurds took control of parts of Iraq, with the full support of the US and George Bush Sr. etc, eventually they let it be and Saddam used chemical nerve agents to kill thousands during the Al Anfal Campaign.

What kurds think of Saddam

Like most Iraqis, there was stability during his period, Iraq was at the time the most progressive nation with the best education rates in the Middle East and just a hundred years ago one of the richest and most liberal countries, and that all fell apart during Saddams era and from the leaders he took over. He used violent and harsh techniques to control the population, including the genocide which is what he's disliked for most.


2) Minority religion in Kurdistan with 500k/its 700k population living in Kurdistan. Islamic beliefs with a hint of sufism, with many of their beliefs predating Islam. So rituals when the sun comes up and goes down etc. Caves are holy places etc.


3) Only the Kurds in Iraq are autonomous. 2 million in Syria, all marginalised during Al-Assads rule, but since the civil war that looked like heaven thanks to the kidnapping and slaughtering rebels taking control with the mass killing of minorities. At the begin inning Al-Assad killed all the Kurdish leaders, and now the rebels started gathering up Kurds and Christians for slaughter for not partaking in the war, and so kurds are being drawn into the war to defend the northern territories.
0
reply
radiopred
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#28
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#28
(Original post by Einstein786)
HEYY! Im a mixed Kurd from Iraq too! But my mothers ethnicity is actually Pakistani-quite a mixed person I'd love to go to Iraq again, I miss it. But my Grandparents and ancestors would be more of a Turkish background. Iraq is a lovely (relatively peaceful) place, people just don't know it!
Awesome, when did you last go to Iraq and have you been to Turkey. And what a way to put it, Ive only put images of cities up the the countryside is amazing.
0
reply
radiopred
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#29
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#29
(Original post by loveslinus)
Have you heard of Gertrude Bell? If so what are your views on her/ her actions regarding the "Kurdish question"? (Or British imperialism in the region more generally?)
Nope but "Churchill was all for giving independence to the Kurds, but Gertrude Bell counseled against this. She pointed out that the Kurds, being mostly Sunni, when combined with the Arab Sunnis would tend to balance the Shia majority in Iraq. Oil was also an important consideration. If Kurdistan became a part of Iraq, Kirkuk's anticipated oil wealth could finance the new country."

So most of this Ive heard all before, I just wasn't aware of how it was probably down to one person. Iraq was essentially going to be divided into three countries, Kurds, Sunnis and Shias. Every conflict since that date is between these three groups, so yes I deplore her actions and lack of principles. Currently the biggest issue for Kurds is Kirkuk, three provinces in the Kurdish parts of Iraq received autonomy, but Kirkuk and Saladins hometown are the major places that remain. Iraq is essentially refusing to distribute oil revenues fairly and owes billions in unpaid shares, and Kirkuk is the only Kurdish region to face violence and terrorists as the Iraqi forces are controlling the district as opposed to Kurdish forces. Arabs are a minority there. Essentially if there were three countries, the Middle East would not have faced Gulf Wars, Iran-Iraq wars and the formation of the United Arab Republic responsible for the establishments today.
0
reply
VZFF
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#30
Report 5 years ago
#30
Show us more pics
0
reply
DorianGrayism
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#31
Report 5 years ago
#31
(Original post by radiopred)
I'm a Muslim, (Sunni) which also happens to be the most common religion, followed by Christianity, Yezidism and a load of other religions people haven't heard of.
Do many Kurds consider their nationality or religion to be more important?

Also, do you think Kurd independence from Iraq is inevitable?
0
reply
Einstein786
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#32
Report 5 years ago
#32
(Original post by radiopred)
Awesome, when did you last go to Iraq and have you been to Turkey. And what a way to put it, Ive only put images of cities up the the countryside is amazing.
I was quite young actually, about 7 or 8 years ago yes i have, it was lovely-i went last December so it was very cold! But an amazing experience, so much interesting history! have you been?
0
reply
Reform
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#33
Report 5 years ago
#33
(Original post by radiopred)
Yes I am aware of Syria.

First off the PKK, a stupid organisation in the view point of most Kurds. Just like Nelson Mandela was a member of the terrorist unit of the ANC and ordered over a dozen attacks killing multiple, the same goes for the leader of the PKK. However, Mandela did more right then wrong, and even admitted to his crimes (his jail sentence). They were/are both trying to get rid of Aparthidism, but the PKK is more about gaining power than equality which is why its hated. Bare in mind the PKK only formed due to the abuse and inequality among the Kurdish minority in Turkey (14 million people), where they couldn't even speak their own language. Most people including I are happy to see the PKK disabandonment as we don't agree with the principles, although Apartheid still exists. Mandela even rejected his peace prize by Turkey because of its human rights abuses and racism.

YPG formed towards the beginning of this year. Kurds refused to take part in the the Syrian Civil War for both the rebels and the state, and so they were innocently slaughtered. However, the rebels slaughtered and kidnapped hundreds and thousands of Kurds for this reason in the northern cities and Aleppo, and so it was necessary to prevent the innocent killing of Christians, Kurds and other minorities by the terrorist ridden rebels. The most important role of the YPG is to allow the safe passage of refugees into Iraq, there are over 200'000 Syrian Kurds in Iraq now, all paid for by the Kurdish Regional Government as the UN is only willing to help refugees in Turkey.

Whats your opinion of the two acronyms you mentioned?
Both seem to be fighting for nationalism. As for rebels massacring people, then you're incorrect. Infact, claims were made that when they entered ma'loula the rebels attacked the Christians but the nuns testified they didn't.

In any case, I oppose anyone who fights for reasons of patriotism / nationalism.

The following link is worth a read.

http://kurdistantribune.com/2013/how...-who-are-they/
0
reply
radiopred
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#34
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#34
(Original post by Einstein786)
I was quite young actually, about 7 or 8 years ago yes i have, it was lovely-i went last December so it was very cold! But an amazing experience, so much interesting history! have you been?
Haha i went last december, why didnt I see you :P lucky I didnt go this summer, its snowing like crazy.

My family all live in erbil and shaqlawa, ive been four times and hoping to go back this summer for work experience. Apart from spending the first two weeks greeting everyone its quite fun and i enjoy it there, and it makes good instagram pics

Erbil has so much history, well it is the most continually inhabited city in the world, 8000 years!! I love going round the parks, hotels , markets and shopping malls with family and friends


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
radiopred
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#35
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#35
(Original post by DorianGrayism)
Do many Kurds consider their nationality or religion to be more important?

Also, do you think Kurd independence from Iraq is inevitable?
Nationality, as although the majority of the population is Sunni Muslim, it encompasses significant populations of a dozen religions in the region. The city I'm from Erbil, is the longest continually inhabited city in the world, which highlights the historic significance of Kurds. Through that time they have developed their own culture unlike any other, with their dancing, singing, cooking and clothing.

Yes independence is inevitable. Most eyes say 2-5 years, but in my opinion thats just hope. The rest of Iraq is an ungovernable mess with no security, unlike the north, so it is in the publics interest to gain full independence, although they already control the majority of their lives through their own central government. Most Kurds like me don't even speak Arabic, which i think highlights the point of independence, as its not even possible to communicate freely with one another. The central government is seen as an inconvenience, trying to destabilise the region and preventing the use of resources and withholding oil revenues etc.
0
reply
RoyalBlue7
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#36
Report 5 years ago
#36
(Original post by radiopred)
1) It was essentially a mini-uprising, because of the inequality between kurds and arabs. There was no infrastructure spending, electricity, sewers, roads etc. There was an ethnic cleansing operation in Iraq at the time, so some Kurds took control of parts of Iraq, with the full support of the US and George Bush Sr. etc, eventually they let it be and Saddam used chemical nerve agents to kill thousands during the Al Anfal Campaign.

What kurds think of Saddam

Like most Iraqis, there was stability during his period, Iraq was at the time the most progressive nation with the best education rates in the Middle East and just a hundred years ago one of the richest and most liberal countries, and that all fell apart during Saddams era and from the leaders he took over. He used violent and harsh techniques to control the population, including the genocide which is what he's disliked for most.


2) Minority religion in Kurdistan with 500k/its 700k population living in Kurdistan. Islamic beliefs with a hint of sufism, with many of their beliefs predating Islam. So rituals when the sun comes up and goes down etc. Caves are holy places etc.


3) Only the Kurds in Iraq are autonomous. 2 million in Syria, all marginalised during Al-Assads rule, but since the civil war that looked like heaven thanks to the kidnapping and slaughtering rebels taking control with the mass killing of minorities. At the begin inning Al-Assad killed all the Kurdish leaders, and now the rebels started gathering up Kurds and Christians for slaughter for not partaking in the war, and so kurds are being drawn into the war to defend the northern territories.
So many problems...

And one last question...

Have the population of Kurds increased or decreased in recent times and by how much? I mean the Kurds in the Kurdistan region

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
radiopred
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#37
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#37
(Original post by StUdEnTIGCSE)
So many problems...

And one last question...

Have the population of Kurds increased or decreased in recent times and by how much? I mean the Kurds in the Kurdistan region

Posted from TSR Mobile
If you're talking about the population of the Kurdish autonomous region in Iraq it has exponentially increased:

1) Hundreds and thousands of Christian and Kurdish refugees have entered from Iran and Syria over the last three years
2) Look at the pictures on the first page, its only representative of the north, the rest of Iraq is essentially rubble, so many Arabs have migrated upwards
3) Due to the stability and safety now and during the Iraq war many Kurds outside the autonomous region have moved there, for example 90% of my family used to live in Bagdad but all moved to Erbil (one of the reasons house prices there are more expensive than LA)
0
reply
radiopred
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#38
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#38
(Original post by Reform)
Both seem to be fighting for nationalism. As for rebels massacring people, then you're incorrect. Infact, claims were made that when they entered ma'loula the rebels attacked the Christians but the nuns testified they didn't.

In any case, I oppose anyone who fights for reasons of patriotism / nationalism.

The following link is worth a read.

http://kurdistantribune.com/2013/how...-who-are-they/
What do you call 200'000 civilians fleeing to north Iraq. The government and Al-Assad is not in control in the north of Syria, as the army fled and they're not even trying to fight the rebels in the northern towns, its 100% rebel run.

Because a nun testified that there wasn't a massacre is not representative of the country, there are thousands upon thousands of christians. Just because you are in full support of christian beheading minority killing rebels doesn't mean its acceptable to ignore their actions. The fraction of the rebels with the most soldiers is the Al-Qaeda element trying to merge Syria and Iraq into one country, the North of Iraq faced its third terrorist attack since 2003 by them just last September, the first attack in 6 years.

Yes the government in Syria should be toppled, but the rebels are no better than the armed thugs ruling Libya today.

Kurds are only fighting for nationalism as set out in the treaty of Sevres because they are being continually victimised and killed off through violence, genocide and torture. Iran provides no funding in Kurdish populated provinces, and holds daily silent executions. Until recently you couldn't even speak Kurdish, or even get a full education. If there was equality there would be no need for nationalism, this is a fight to end the Apartheid and any person with decent principles would support equality.
0
reply
Einstein786
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#39
Report 5 years ago
#39
(Original post by radiopred)
Haha i went last december, why didnt I see you :P lucky I didnt go this summer, its snowing like crazy.

My family all live in erbil and shaqlawa, ive been four times and hoping to go back this summer for work experience. Apart from spending the first two weeks greeting everyone its quite fun and i enjoy it there, and it makes good instagram pics

Erbil has so much history, well it is the most continually inhabited city in the world, 8000 years!! I love going round the parks, hotels , markets and shopping malls with family and friends


Posted from TSR Mobile
ahhh no way! Where abouts did you go?? yeahh haha I heard! aww soo lucky! Well enjoy it, defiantly makes amazing pictures! People are always so surprised! lool meeting relatives always takes forever! it has its autonomous region doesn't it? Kurdistan? soo much more developed than I remembered!
0
reply
radiopred
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#40
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#40
(Original post by Einstein786)
ahhh no way! Where abouts did you go?? yeahh haha I heard! aww soo lucky! Well enjoy it, defiantly makes amazing pictures! People are always so surprised! lool meeting relatives always takes forever! it has its autonomous region doesn't it? Kurdistan? soo much more developed than I remembered!
I always just go to the city of Erbil and shaqlawa, around the citadel and the english regions. Its snowing there at the moment, why can't we have some of that weather :/ I just can't stand the relatives that stuff you with food :P

Yeah its changed so much since I've last been, its developing so fast. This is a $5bn project being made by the same company who made half of Dubai, its going to finish in 5 years, looks dope:


0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts

All the exam results help you need

2,825

people online now

225,530

students helped last year

Do you have grade requirements for your sixth form/college?

At least 5 GCSEs at grade 4 (15)
17.05%
At least 5 GCSEs at grade 5 (13)
14.77%
At least 5 GCSEs at grade 6 (21)
23.86%
Higher than 5 GCSEs at grade 6 (32)
36.36%
Pass in English and Maths GCSE (1)
1.14%
No particular grades needed (6)
6.82%

Watched Threads

View All