Titles for Law after a persons name

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All-rounder
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#1
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#1
I know there are PhD's for Doctrates in things like Medicine, but I was wondering what there is for law, I can't seem to find any lists on the internet at all.
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Interstellar
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#2
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In America, upon completing a law degree you're entitled to some initials, but no self respecting lawyer would use them.

If you complete a PhD however, you can use 'Dr'. It's pretty rare to see a lawyer with this though, as it's pretty useless unless you want to pursue a career in academia.





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#3
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(Original post by Interstellar)
In America, upon completing a law degree you're entitled to some initials, but no self respecting lawyer would use them.

If you complete a PhD however, you can use 'Dr'. It's pretty rare to see a lawyer with this though, as it's pretty useless unless you want to pursue a career in academia.
But what about in the UK?
If you complete a Bachelors/Masters/Doctrate in Law, are you able to put the LLB/LLM/LLD in you name?
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Ras17
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#4
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#4
If you mean if LLB becomes a title you can use, then yes, I've seen it but usually when referring to their academic credentials.

According to the Open University. you can use it as title, as specified under the section "Classification of your degree".

Honestly, I wouldn't use it. It just doesn't have the same clout as "Dr" and appears a tad pretentious but each to their own.
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nulli tertius
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#5
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(Original post by All-rounder)
I know there are PhD's for Doctrates in things like Medicine, but I was wondering what there is for law, I can't seem to find any lists on the internet at all.
A graduate is entitled to use the post-nominal letters of his degree after his name. A law firm which is a traditional partnership with fewer than 20 partners must publish their names on the firm's notepaper. Different firms have different policies on whether degrees are included or not.

Other lawyer qualifications that one sees as post-nominal letters are:

F.Inst.L.Ex (formerly FILEX), A.Inst.L.Ex and G.Inst.L.Ex for legal execs and trainee legal execs.

WS, AWS and AffWS for Writers to the Signet, foreign lawyer members of the Society and part-qualified persons.

NP for a notary public

TEP for a Trusts and Estates Practitioner

SSC Solicitor in the Supreme Courts [of Scotland]
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Le Nombre
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#6
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Personally I've gone for the pre-nominal 'Oh Great Purveyor of Justice'.
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tehforum
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#7
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(Original post by Le Nombre)
Personally I've gone for the pre-nominal 'Oh Great Purveyor of Justice'.
Commercial Uniform Nigerian Transactor.
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nulli tertius
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#8
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(Original post by tehforum)
Commercial Uniform Nigerian Transactor.
The problem with Nigerians is that they are so damn careless. Hardly a week goes buy without there being another one that has somehow managed to get a billion pounds or so trapped in a bank account somewhere. That is only the ones who ask me for help. Think of all the lawyers who get asked to sort out these messes.
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#9
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
A graduate is entitled to use the post-nominal letters of his degree after his name. A law firm which is a traditional partnership with fewer than 20 partners must publish their names on the firm's notepaper. Different firms have different policies on whether degrees are included or not.

Other lawyer qualifications that one sees as post-nominal letters are:

F.Inst.L.Ex (formerly FILEX), A.Inst.L.Ex and G.Inst.L.Ex for legal execs and trainee legal execs.

WS, AWS and AffWS for Writers to the Signet, foreign lawyer members of the Society and part-qualified persons.

NP for a notary public

TEP for a Trusts and Estates Practitioner

SSC Solicitor in the Supreme Courts [of Scotland]
But could you put these after your name in other situations, e.g. an application form or the sign on your office door, etc
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nulli tertius
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#10
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#10
(Original post by All-rounder)
But could you put these after your name in other situations, e.g. an application form or the sign on your office door, etc
http://www.probatecasehelp.co.uk/services.html

http://www.hamiltonburns.com/tas.html

http://www.beltramiandcompany.co.uk/...ay-macara.html
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lyrical_lie
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#11
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#11
LLB or LLM with the masters also DIP L.P is one I've seen too.
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RPNX
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#12
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#12
Hmm true but these are all qualifications, - what separates an LPC grad from a Solicitor in the UK?

M.SRA (Member of the Solicitors Regulation Authority)?

Q. Sol or SSC (Solicitor of the Senior Courts in England and Wales)?
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szo
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#13
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(Original post by RPNX)
Hmm true but these are all qualifications, - what separates an LPC grad from a Solicitor in the UK?

M.SRA (Member of the Solicitors Regulation Authority)?

Q. Sol or SSC (Solicitor of the Senior Courts in England and Wales)?
If you're just an LPC graduate, you're not a solicitor and can't use the name. A solicitor will (usually) have done a 2 year training contract post LPC (there are exceptions if you have previously qualified as a barrister/C.ilex/foreign lawyer) and (in any case) must have a current practising certificate from the SRA
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RPNX
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#14
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#14
Sure, but I mean an LPC grad has the same post nominals as a Solicitor. There is no pre or post nominals for a qualified solicitor in the UK - they will have the same letters after their name as an LPC grad.
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nulli tertius
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#15
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#15
(Original post by RPNX)
Sure, but I mean an LPC grad has the same post nominals as a Solicitor. There is no pre or post nominals for a qualified solicitor in the UK - they will have the same letters after their name as an LPC grad.
Very few solicitors use their degrees or other post-nominal letters professionally.

I have five sets. I never use any of them.
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