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    Can you make a living out of being purely a mathematician, and thereby not merging into any other subject. Is it possible?

    Why is maths so important for out world today?..is it even more important than the arts would you think.?
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    No, you can't get anywhere. 96% of homeless and unemployed people are maths graduates.

    Of course you can get somewhere! Sure, if you adamently refuse to do anything but abstract mathematics you will have trouble finding a job outside academia perhaps, but plenty of areas of work use maths if you're willing to apply it to something. Finance, electrical & civil engineering, aeronautics, telecommunications, network protocols, accounting, academia.

    Think of a technology and there's maths behind it.
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    (Original post by Kquishir)
    Can you make a living out of being purely a mathematician, and thereby not merging into any other subject. Is it possible?

    Why is maths so important for out world today?..is it even more important than the arts would you think.?
    A quote from "From Here to Infinity" by Ian Stewart:

    "For example, take something as innocuous as a jar of jam. The container is made in a computer-controlled factory. Its label is printed by machinery designed according to mathematical principles of the strength of materials and the behaviour of lubricants. Its ingredients are transported in ships that navigate using satellites, whose orbits are analysed mathematically to give the ship's position. The price is determined by the rules of mathematical economics. Now start thinking about how you make the computers, launch the satellites, build the ships, even make the paper for the label...

    I've forgotten something... oh, yes - the fruit. What could be simpler than raspberries? But even the plants you grow in your garden aren't as straightforward as you may think. Raspberries are disease-prone: they have to be destroyed every five or ten years and replaced by plants imported from colder regions, such as Scotland. The breeders are constantly seeking new varieties, and a great deal of probability theory and combinatorics goes into the statistical tests used to check the progress of breeding. What about genetic engineering, looming on the horizon? Or the weather forecasting that warns the grower of an early frost?

    We live in a complicated world, where nothing is as simple as it once was, nothing is as simple as it seems to be. Mathematics knits that world together.

    Don't you forget it.
    "

    Yes; you can get somewhere with mathematics.
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    (Original post by Kquishir)
    Can you make a living out of being purely a mathematician, and thereby not merging into any other subject. Is it possible?

    Why is maths so important for out world today?..is it even more important than the arts would you think.?
    Depends on what jobs and careers you're interested in specifically, but generally Maths graduates are well sought after. They are now particularly wanted in finance - investment banking, quantitative analysis, deriviatives.
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    Also actuaries.
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    A quote from "From Here to Infinity" by Ian Stewart
    That's an excellent quote! I think I need to read that book.
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    (Original post by AlphaNumeric)
    No, you can't get anywhere. 96% of homeless and unemployed people are maths graduates.
    :eek: I knew it!!
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    (Original post by AlphaNumeric)
    No, you can't get anywhere. 96% of homeless and unemployed people are maths graduates.
    Just give £2 a month, and you can help a Cambridge mathematician afford the basic necessities of life, by keeping him in pencils, paper and chalk. Please, just give £2 a month, or whatever you can afford.
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    (Original post by MarcD)
    That's an excellent quote! I think I need to read that book.
    Actually the quote is from 'Letters to a Young Mathematician' also by Ian Stewart. Though FHTI was good too.
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    (Original post by Kquishir)
    Can you make a living out of being purely a mathematician, and thereby not merging into any other subject. Is it possible?

    Why is maths so important for out world today?..is it even more important than the arts would you think.?
    Look at this website:
    http://www.prospects.ac.uk/cms/ShowPage/Home_page/What_do_graduates_do__2006/charts_and_tables_pages/p!eXeLamL?subject_id=20

    http://mathscareers.atticmedia.com/u...sForSkills.pdf
    http://mathscareers.atticmedia.com/u...OpensDoors.pdf
    http://mathscareers.atticmedia.com/u...Difference.pdf
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    Yes, and a damn good one, too.
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    (Original post by Kernel)
    Actually the quote is from 'Letters to a Young Mathematician' also by Ian Stewart. Though FHTI was good too.
    You really think I memorised it? I was typing it directly from the book. :p: Maybe he wrote it in both. But he certainly wrote it in "From Here to Infinity".
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    to be fair, from here to infinity is utterly terrible. i can't remember that passage being it in. i'm sure it was all just "knots, knots, i like knots, topology, knots, chop a sphere in 2, knots, knots".

    at the moment i'm reading Korner's The Pleasures of Counting, which is predictably good. i have a resentment with professor korner for referring to the reader (and not just in this book...) always as 'she' though.
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    (Original post by chewwy)
    to be fair, from here to infinity is utterly terrible. i can't remember that passage being it in. i'm sure it was all just "knots, knots, i like knots, topology, knots, chop a sphere in 2, knots, knots".

    at the moment i'm reading Korner's The Pleasures of Counting, which is predictably good. i have a resentment with professor korner for referring to the reader (and not just in this book...) always as 'she' though.
    It's the very last passage in the book. And yeah, Stewart does go overboard with knots and topology, I thought exactly the same thing while reading it, and missed every single topology section out. In fact the first half of the book is worth it as a popular science book anyway.

    Although, to be honest, if you've ever read any general "popular science" maths book, don't bother - they're all the same. :p:
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    Although, to be honest, if you've ever read any general "popular science" maths book, don't bother - they're all the same. :p:
    lol, tell me about it. the irrationality of the square root of 2, fermat's last theorem, the golden ratio, i could go on. every book find it neccessary to mention them.
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    Yeah. I'm actually currently reading a popular science book called "A Brief History of Infinity" by Brian Clegg, which is really interesting, because it's specific rather than general. It still touches on these points but still, it's very interesting. Also I got it for £3 somehow. So I recommend it.

    Also, "What Is Mathematics?" by Courant and Robbins, albeit old and heavy in style, is an amazing book. I've read about 80 pages and already covered pretty much everything I've ever learnt (minus a couple of topics like calculus which come up later on), more rigorously than I could ever have imagined.
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    (Original post by chewwy)
    to be fair, from here to infinity is utterly terrible. i can't remember that passage being it in. i'm sure it was all just "knots, knots, i like knots, topology, knots, chop a sphere in 2, knots, knots".

    at the moment i'm reading Korner's The Pleasures of Counting, which is predictably good. i have a resentment with professor korner for referring to the reader (and not just in this book...) always as 'she' though.
    :rofl:
 
 
 
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