Dony111
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Hi Guys,

Can you help me choose my A-Levels. Would the following choices be smart and suitable. Can you please state why. Would University's accept this?

Biology, Computing, Physics, Product Design

Thanks
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alow
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(Original post by Dony111)
Hi Guys,

Can you help me choose my A-Levels. Would the following choices be smart and suitable. Can you please state why. Would University's accept this?

Biology, Computing, Physics, Product Design

Thanks
That completely depends on which course you want to do and which universities you want to apply to.
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Jkizer
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Without reference to what you want to do, near impossible.

Looks like an open set though.


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Arturo09
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(Original post by Dony111)
Hi Guys,

Can you help me choose my A-Levels. Would the following choices be smart and suitable. Can you please state why. Would University's accept this?

Biology, Computing, Physics, Product Design

Thanks
I agree with the other guys, depends on what degree you aim to do in the future.

Sciences are always "attractive" subjects however, I can't help seeing that you are planning to do physics without maths! Is this even acceptable in your school/sixth form?
Nearly all of A Level physics is maths based and an advanced understanding of formulae is necessary if you want to achieve good grades.

May I ask why you are planning not to do A Level maths?
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ferdy118
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Product design and computing aren't facilitating subjects. Plus you'd be a fool to take physics without maths. Also, maths is almost essential nowadays to get into a lot of top universities
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Dony111
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I want to do game design or electronic engineering course
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Dony111
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(Original post by Arturo09)
I agree with the other guys, depends on what degree you aim to do in the future.

Sciences are always "attractive" subjects however, I can't help seeing that you are planning to do physics without maths! Is this even acceptable in your school/sixth form?
Nearly all of A Level physics is maths based and an advanced understanding of formulae is necessary if you want to achieve good grades.

May I ask why you are planning not to do A Level maths?
i find that a-level maths maybe hard
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Arturo09
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(Original post by Dony111)
i find that a-level maths maybe hard
I understand you exactly and you are completely right to think that maths is hard, because it is! It's the second hardest a level you can do. And even those who achieved amazing grades in GCSE are failing at maths currently, so if you feel like you won't be able to cope with it then you're wise not to do it. However, i'm not here to tell you not to do a subject or degree. But the issue is if you want to do electronic engineering, then yes, you will require maths, and at a decent level, whatever happens.

Maths is not impossible. Those who put the time, effort and more into their study's, especially maths will have a better understanding of the subject. You just have to think hard, and focus. Look at what they want you to work out and how you're going to get the right answer. Trust me, if you motivate yourself to work hard, do extra hours of maths study, focus and contribute in class, and even get a personal tutor, you will get the grade you want.

There is an alternative however. You could stick with the subjects you want to do and then if you feel you want to do a degree in electronic engineering, then you could do that course with a foundation year. Usually this foundation year is for students who didn't achieve the right grades at A Level or just picked the wrong subjects. In your case, you would definitely need maths, but you are doing 2 hard subjects which will increase your chance of getting a place on this course.

The only issue is that the foundation year is going to cost you money as well, sometimes up to £8k

Only you know how good you really are and if you want to pursue a degree in engineering, then work hard!

Any questions feel free to ask
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Dony111
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(Original post by Arturo09)
I understand you exactly and you are completely right to think that maths is hard, because it is! It's the second hardest a level you can do. And even those who achieved amazing grades in GCSE are failing at maths currently, so if you feel like you won't be able to cope with it then you're wise not to do it. However, i'm not here to tell you not to do a subject or degree. But the issue is if you want to do electronic engineering, then yes, you will require maths, and at a decent level, whatever happens.

Maths is not impossible. Those who put the time, effort and more into their study's, especially maths will have a better understanding of the subject. You just have to think hard, and focus. Look at what they want you to work out and how you're going to get the right answer. Trust me, if you motivate yourself to work hard, do extra hours of maths study, focus and contribute in class, and even get a personal tutor, you will get the grade you want.

There is an alternative however. You could stick with the subjects you want to do and then if you feel you want to do a degree in electronic engineering, then you could do that course with a foundation year. Usually this foundation year is for students who didn't achieve the right grades at A Level or just picked the wrong subjects. In your case, you would definitely need maths, but you are doing 2 hard subjects which will increase your chance of getting a place on this course.

The only issue is that the foundation year is going to cost you money as well, sometimes up to £8k

Only you know how good you really are and if you want to pursue a degree in engineering, then work hard!

Any questions feel free to ask
Thanks you for giving me this advice. I'm a B grade maths GCSE student. Would you recommended me doing a-level mathematics.
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fightingduck
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(Original post by Dony111)
Thanks you for giving me this advice. I'm a B grade maths GCSE student. Would you recommended me doing a-level mathematics.
I achieved a B in GCSE Maths.
I took it for A-Level, and I find it okay, hoping for a good B overall.
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Arturo09
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(Original post by Dony111)
Thanks you for giving me this advice. I'm a B grade maths GCSE student. Would you recommended me doing a-level mathematics.
In some schools, they are now introducing Maths induction tests for those wanting to do AS Level Maths. The requirement for doing maths in schools vary's, but I think the minimum is a B, if there is a C somewhere then they must have a lot of failing students

If your school is like this, and has an induction test, then all I can say is revise for the test and makes sure you pass it. This test is a great guideline to those who are unsure about weather to do A Level maths. The induction test consists of basic topics that you WILL NEED TO LEARN ALMOST OFF BY HEART, the topics should have been covered at GCSE though so it should seem familiar once you refresh your memory.

In your case, I have seen and know of students who have been accepted with a B, and who have been rejected. To be perfectly honest, these are just guidelines they give us students. Like the person above has stated, they achieved a B and are coping well with the work, but there are people who achieved A* and are on E/U's.

At A Level, it is all down to how you interpret maths, and how you are going to use what you have to get you the right answer. Make sure if you are going to do it that you brush up on some topics before you start in September though, it will be a massive bonus to know what the teacher is actually talking about when the time comes and also so the content becomes quite familiar to you.

All in all, I cannot really advise you weather to do it or not, with whatever grade you come out with. If you WANT to do it, then by all means do it and make sure you work hard. If you're unsure then it is best to try something like an induction test and see what you get.

Anything else, just ask
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