Toblerone94
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Hi all

I will be embarking on an undergraduate degree with LSE or possibly Royal Holloway next year and am particularly interested in studying areas of social science and finance.

I cannot decide between Economics & Management (joint honours to cut down the maths a tad), Politics and or International Relations and finally Business Administration. I know Economics is highly regarded but the LSE course is strenuous and my maths isn't fantastic but I loved it at A Level. Politics and IR interest me but I don't know much about how highly regarded and app local it is to jobs and employers. I know business graduates are always in demand too but this probably interests me least I believe.

Best option for a high flying career in the future?
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Toblerone94
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Applicable * not app local
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polscistudent88
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It is very difficult to answer your questions, especially because they are very different degrees.

Economics and Management, and Business Administration, are both degrees aimed to prepare you to work primarily in a private company. Politics and IR is mainly thought for careers in either research or public agencies (international, domestic, or local... or companies that regularly deal with similar actors). Between the three Politics and IR is probably the least "vocational (i.e. it gives you less specific competences than the other two).

What you need to keep in mind is that any degree will not guarantee you a "high flying career" in the future. You will need to work hard, achieve good grades, gain experiences outside university (internships, volunteering, and so on). Also, graduate courses are the more and more popular for the social sciences.

I think the best thing to do is to understand, first of all, where you picture yourself. If you like working in research, politics, public administration, international organizations (or eventually journalism), then Politics and IR might be the best choice. If you would prefer to have a career in the private sector, then the other two might make your life easier*.

* None of the above-mentioned degree will "force" you to go either public or private. I am only talking about the "most straight-forward" careers. Ah, I have not mentioned all possible career paths... Since you are looking at very different fields, I think it is better to concentrate on the most obvious.
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Toblerone94
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Thanks for the in depth advice, it did clear things up.

I'm leaning more towards Politics and IR joint. Although there is the option of just IR, is this more or less prestigious and regarded than politics single?
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polscistudent88
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(Original post by Toblerone94)
Thanks for the in depth advice, it did clear things up.

I'm leaning more towards Politics and IR joint. Although there is the option of just IR, is this more or less prestigious and regarded than politics single?
Happy I helped

IR is a subfield of political science, so is not more prestigious. However, if you would like to work for international or supranational agencies and institutions, it might help to have IR in your degree name. But you should really pick up what you like: if you prefer straight politics, then do not worry about other things* (also, politics almost always offers modules in IR). Remember that there is also the possibility for studying jointly politics and economics if you are interested in both.

* As for any other degree, and especially non-vocational ones, your achievements will be important for placement. So, try to maximize the possibility of doing good.
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DeemzBeamz
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(Original post by Toblerone94)
Thanks for the in depth advice, it did clear things up.

I'm leaning more towards Politics and IR joint. Although there is the option of just IR, is this more or less prestigious and regarded than politics single?


I had the exact same issue as you. Except I couldn't decide between politics/IR/economics. However I have decided to apply for IR.

Economics for me is too focused on a specific field. Athough economics may be more respected (im not sure that's true though) i decided to go for IR because I am interested in working for an international organisation.

IR includes the international economy and development, which is finance/business related, political theory, globalisation, human rights, international law. So I chose it over politics and economics because I thought it would give me a more open field of career choices. But obviously if I want to get into banking/finance an economics degree would be more straight forward. Thing is, I'm not sure I should follow that path yet

I would go with IR over politics if I were you.
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Toblerone94
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Again many thanks for all your words; it's invaluable to hear from people's own firsthand experiences.

I've cut down my choice to Politics and or IR or Economics & Management but the maths content is the only thing putting me off; everyone says further maths is a must for LSE Economics and that's scary to me!

I don't know whether to go straight IR or Politics and IR, I wouldn't do straight politics.
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DeemzBeamz
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(Original post by Toblerone94)
Again many thanks for all your words; it's invaluable to hear from people's own firsthand experiences.

I've cut down my choice to Politics and or IR or Economics & Management but the maths content is the only thing putting me off; everyone says further maths is a must for LSE Economics and that's scary to me!

I don't know whether to go straight IR or Politics and IR, I wouldn't do straight politics.
I don't think it would matter as it wouldn't be regarded as a combined degree. One of my choices included politics and IR I just didn't want to do straight politics.
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polscistudent88
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(Original post by Toblerone94)
Again many thanks for all your words; it's invaluable to hear from people's own firsthand experiences.

I've cut down my choice to Politics and or IR or Economics & Management but the maths content is the only thing putting me off; everyone says further maths is a must for LSE Economics and that's scary to me!

I don't know whether to go straight IR or Politics and IR, I wouldn't do straight politics.
Then go for Politics and IR? It's still a politics degree, and convince you the most

Not sure if you could be interested, but if I'm not wrong Lancaster, Warwick, and Birmingham offer IR & Economics... Though it was worth saying since you are still considering Economics&Management

Best of luck with your decision!
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