Should school details really be included on UCAS forms?

Watch
Ozwsm
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#1
With almost daily reports of educational prejudices in our society, it becomes clearer each day how much of an advantage pupils of some schools and colleges have over others.
In a world where a disturbingly disproportionate number of public schooled pupils gain places at top universities, would it not be wise to remove any details of schools attended on the UCAS form?

I understand, statistically speaking, a higher than expected level of public schoolchildren will receive offers due to the higher quality of education they ultimately may receive. However, is it not right that all students should be judged solely on their ability and character, regardless of whether one attended a top private school or a mediocre comprehensive - a prejudice which is clear to see with the current system.

Thanks!


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
Origami Bullets
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#2
Report 7 years ago
#2
Students from public schools are admitted disproportionately due to a number of factors including
- higher grades, on average
- parents who are (by definition) interested in and willing to invest time, effort and money into their offspring's education
- a culture of high expectations
- selective education - so there are no thick ones to drag the stats down
- better teaching (though that one's debatable)
- more likely to apply to uni in the first place
All of these things occur long before an admissions tutor gets anywhere near seeing what school they went to.

In fact, it's invariably an advantage (or certainly not a disadvantage) in uni applications to have got the grades despite having gone to an underperforming school, as it shows that you're intelligent and able to shift for yourself.

To remove data on which school someone went to removes much of the context surrounding their application, and would arguably advantage people from public schools the most.
3
reply
cant_think_of_name
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#3
Report 7 years ago
#3
(Original post by Origami Bullets)
Students from public schools are admitted disproportionately due to a number of factors including
- higher grades, on average
- parents who are (by definition) interested in and willing to invest time, effort and money into their offspring's education
- a culture of high expectations
- selective education - so there are no thick ones to drag the stats down
- better teaching (though that one's debatable)
- more likely to apply to uni in the first place
All of these things occur long before an admissions tutor gets anywhere near seeing what school they went to.

In fact, it's invariably an advantage (or certainly not a disadvantage) in uni applications to have got the grades despite having gone to an underperforming school, as it shows that you're intelligent and able to shift for yourself.

To remove data on which school someone went to removes much of the context surrounding their application, and would arguably advantage people from public schools the most.
Said everything I was going to say, but better. Good job
0
reply
llys
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#4
Report 7 years ago
#4
I think it should be removed, yes. Or perhaps it could be left on the form for UCAS, so that UCAS can calculate your percentile performance (grades relative to school performance), but admissions tutors would only see the latter and not the school name. I don't really care that much though.

If you bring in these changes I'd suggest that wearing school ties to interviews should lead to automatic rejection as well (because that proves you are a moron). :lol:
0
reply
Bloxorus
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#5
Report 7 years ago
#5
No. It should definitely be taken into account.

You ask whether universities should take character and ability into account only when making decisions, regardless of background, but surely background compared to grades and achievement shows a lot about character?
For example someone who has a straight A* record from a state comprehensive and has been brought up on a council estate surely shows more strength of character than someone who has the same grades but has been sent through the best education money can buy with an extremely supportive environment.
When it comes to university where that kind of support doesn't exist, which one of these students will find it harder? I'll let you decide.
0
reply
Jamerson
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#6
Report 7 years ago
#6
No. I went to a failing comprehensive school that OFSTED put into special measures as I completed my GCSEs. I left with poor GCSEs, but then went to a Grammar school for my A-levels and achieved three A*.
Having this contextual knowledge, universities I applied to were able to see that despite my disadvantage, I am a hard-worker, and have beaten all odds.
School details on UCAS can only be an advantage for those who go to poor schools, and I believe this firmly.
0
reply
flopsybunnybell
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#7
Report 7 years ago
#7
I go to a private school and firmly believe that the universities I apply to should be able to see where I've been going to school for the last 7 years. I am very lucky and fortunate to have attended such a good school with such amazing teachers - therefore, I think it's fair that universities should expect that I would probably have higher grades than a state school student. If I went to a state school I would want universities to be able to see that I had been disadvantaged in education.


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How are you feeling about starting university this autumn?

Really excited (71)
22.98%
Excited but a bit nervous (137)
44.34%
Not bothered either way (37)
11.97%
I'm really nervous (64)
20.71%

Watched Threads

View All