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    And this:
    (Original post by Kings college website)
    We believe that the STEP papers in Mathematics and Further Mathematics are extremely useful preparation and so most of our conditional offers will be based on both A levels and the relevant STEP paper(s).
    I think STEP is pretty much a given if you're applying to Cam for maths, as far as I've been able to tell - unless you can nab an EE offer from Christs or have some special reason for not doing it.
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    King's used not to use STEP, but they adopted it as of the last round of admissions I believe (or possibly the round before).
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    They now all use STEP all the time (unless there are exceptional circumstances), except Christ's, Corpus and and Robinson, which use it "often" (their word, not mine).
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    Yeah, but the rest were probably very good, and Wrangler was probably very close to the A/A* boundary. AAAABBBBBC is... by Cambridge standards... poor.
    I wouldn't know how close I was to an A* (I might have just scraped an A), but I don't think that's relevant to be honest - the majority of my GCSEs were Bs. While having mega GCSEs is excellent, I don't think it adds that much more to your application. I certainly don't think my GCSEs put me at a grave disadvantage.

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    I know King's has a ridiculous applicantslace ratio, 6:1 or something, but are the extra applicants actually any good?
    i.e. is it actually any harder to get into King's than Clare or Emmanuel or another central college?
    Is it harder to get into King's than Trinity?
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    That ratio is probably from when King's didn't ask for STEP. As of recently, they've gone the way of every other college and all their offers (or most of them) will ask for STEP, so that ratio should be back down to normal as of this round of applications.
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    Hmm, but if people are using old information, it may stay high... Although people who don't at least look at the college website are probably less likely to get in anyway :p:

    Thanks Francis (?)
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    I think it's silly to even attempt to play the numbers game - there'll be a fair few people trying it anyway, so if anything colleges with higher ratios for one year may be likely to have lower ratios the next. I wish Cambridge didn't publish individual per-college ratios.
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    (Original post by Speleo)
    I know King's has a ridiculous applicantslace ratio, 6:1 or something, but are the extra applicants actually any good?
    i.e. is it actually any harder to get into King's than Clare or Emmanuel or another central college?
    Is it harder to get into King's than Trinity?
    Considering King's has roughly 12 places per year and Trinity has 40, yes it is. It all depends on one particular year. If your statistic is right, there are two ways of looking at it: either "I still have to be better than 5/6 of the applicants there so my chances are the same" or "I have to be better than 60 applicants rather than the usual 10 I might get at _____". And it's neither of those - it depends on both how many applicants there are and how good the applicants are in general. (Come on, mathematicians should be able to handle simple stats! :p:) King's is incredibly popular because it's central and big and the most famous. Trinity isn't as big or as famous. But in the end it's just where you're going to be living and I'd rather live somewhere small where you know everyone than somewhere huge where you'd never get to know people. All the lectures are university-based and so on, and as has been said, the numbers change each year. I wouldn't bother trying to keep track of them.
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    Trinity isn't as big or as famous.
    Sorry to be a monkey and pick at your nits, but Trinity is ma-husive, it has nearly double the number of students as King's. And I'm not sure about the fame of King's (crafty avoidance of apostrophe problems) - the chapel is ridiculously famous, no doubt, but the college as a whole? Those thinking of maths will surely have heard of Trinity first and foremost, what with Newton and his flying fruit.
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    ^^
    What he said

    King's had Turing but I am not sure if that would attract people or put them off
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    Considering King's has roughly 12 places per year and Trinity has 40, yes it is. It all depends on one particular year. If your statistic is right, there are two ways of looking at it: either "I still have to be better than 5/6 of the applicants there so my chances are the same" or "I have to be better than 60 applicants rather than the usual 10 I might get at _____". And it's neither of those - it depends on both how many applicants there are and how good the applicants are in general. (Come on, mathematicians should be able to handle simple stats! :p:) King's is incredibly popular because it's central and big and the most famous. Trinity isn't as big or as famous. But in the end it's just where you're going to be living and I'd rather live somewhere small where you know everyone than somewhere huge where you'd never get to know people. All the lectures are university-based and so on, and as has been said, the numbers change each year. I wouldn't bother trying to keep track of them.
    What? Trinity is the famous one for maths. Although the constant talk about the IMO team going there may actually put people off applying and reduce the numbers I guess.
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    I agree, Trinity is more popular for maths. But originally I looked at Cambridge as a whole, before even deciding I wanted to do maths - and most people will start looking at, or thinking of, universities, without having researched great deals into which college they want to go to or which is best for their subject; a lot of people won't even have decided which subject they want to do before falling in love with Cambridge. And, outside maths, King's is more popular than Trinity.
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    I think it's silly to even attempt to play the numbers game - there'll be a fair few people trying it anyway, so if anything colleges with higher ratios for one year may be likely to have lower ratios the next. I wish Cambridge didn't publish individual per-college ratios.
    Deciding between King's and Trinity is hardly 'playing the numbers game'
    I'd be happy going to either one, so it makes sense to pick the one which I'm more likely to get into.
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    (Original post by Speleo)
    Deciding between King's and Trinity is hardly 'playing the numbers game'
    I'd be happy going to either one, so it makes sense to pick the one which I'm more likely to get into.
    And how do you know which that is? Any numbers game you could play could be played by hundreds of other people, swinging the odds hugely against you. Try double bluffing and I guarantee you there will be plenty of people who'll have thuoght of that too.
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    Oh yeah, we did get told that Kings gets higher applicant ratios in general than everywhere else on the open day.
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    And how do you know which that is? Any numbers game you could play could be played by hundreds of other people, swinging the odds hugely against you. Try double bluffing and I guarantee you there will be plenty of people who'll have thuoght of that too.
    Could be, but typically aren't if you look at the stats at

    http://www.cam.ac.uk/admissions/unde.../docs/math.doc
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    (Original post by RichE)
    Could be, but typically aren't if you look at the stats at

    http://www.cam.ac.uk/admissions/unde.../docs/math.doc
    Which is all the more reason for them to do it this year, no?
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    (Original post by Speleo)
    I'd be happy going to either one, so it makes sense to pick the one which I'm more likely to get into.
    But to assume that there is a uniform distribution of ability or that one with less "applicants per place" gives you a better chance is just a statistical folly :p: Ones with a lower ratio take in more through pooling and therefore it is very unlikely you are increasing your chances by picking any college (pooling figures are not shown in that file)
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    But to assume that there is a uniform distribution of ability or that one with less "applicants per place" gives you a better chance is just a statistical folly Ones with a lower ratio take in more through pooling and therefore it is very unlikely you are increasing your chances (pooling figures are not shown in that file)
    I know that assuming that a college with fewer applicants per place is easier to get into is a 'statistical folly', thats why I'm asking people instead of just looking at the admission statistics :p:
 
 
 
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