hi guys, what's the difference between a Biomedical Sciences course and a Medicine co

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JacobAlevels
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They seem to be sort of the same when I read an outline of them, they all deal with the same parts of the human body, what's the difference? Is it only the absence of patient contact? Thanks.
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musty345
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The first year or two of medicine and biomed courses are usually pretty similiar. That's why first year biomeds can transfer to medicine, and second year medical students can intercalate and do a biomed BSc. They start differing massively from the third year onwards, with medicine emphasising patient contact.
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Democracy
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(Original post by JacobAlevels)
They seem to be sort of the same when I read an outline of them, they all deal with the same parts of the human body, what's the difference? Is it only the absence of patient contact? Thanks.
Here are my impressions as a biomedical sciences graduate and current medical student:

Biomedical sciences

Way more depth - not much breadth.

Much more sciencey and theoretical - lots of references to the latest research findings courtesy of Drosophila and C elegans.

Practical skills - entirely lab based.

Patient contact - none.

Qualification - if accredited by the IBMS will allow you to work as an NHS biomedical scientist. Alternatively you can gain further qualifications (MSc, PhD etc), get a PGCE or sell your soul to Deloitte.

Similar to pre-clinical medicine? - yes (very superficially) but they are TOTALLY different disciplines. The anatomy module which I took during my biomed degree was more of an "intro to basic human anatomy and bioanthropology" compared to the hardcore anatomy which is taught at med school. You have not truly done anatomy until you've struggled with the muscles of the forearm and the joys of the various spinal cord tracts.

Medicine

A lot of breadth and not much depth - your main challenge will be trying to memorise the vast quantity of information which will be thrown at you, especially during the first two years.

It is NOT a science degree - you won't gain much in the way of news on the latest in lab research. You'll also learn psychology, sociology, ethics, medical law, communication skills etc. It's not all about anatomy, physiology, pharmacology etc.

Practical skills - taught at university and practiced on fellow students and willing patients in hospital/GP settings.

Qualification - gives you provisional registration with the GMC which is upgraded to full registration upon successfully completing your FY1 year.

Expectations - you are told to act like a doctor-in-training from day 1 of the degree. No one will care if a biomed student is caught puking/pissing somewhere inconvenient on a Friday night - the GMC cares if medical students do this however.
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JacobAlevels
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(Original post by Democracy)
Here are my impressions as a biomedical sciences graduate and current medical student:

Biomedical sciences

Way more depth - not much breadth.

Much more sciencey and theoretical - lots of references to the latest research findings courtesy of Drosophila and C elegans.

Practical skills - entirely lab based.

Patient contact - none.

Qualification - if accredited by the IBMS will allow you to work as an NHS biomedical scientist. Alternatively you can gain further qualifications (MSc, PhD etc), get a PGCE or sell your soul to Deloitte.

Similar to pre-clinical medicine? - yes (very superficially) but they are TOTALLY different disciplines. The anatomy module which I took during my biomed degree was more of an "intro to basic human anatomy and bioanthropology" compared to the hardcore anatomy which is taught at med school. You have not truly done anatomy until you've struggled with the muscles of the forearm and the joys of the various spinal cord tracts.

Medicine

A lot of breadth and not much depth - your main challenge will be trying to memorise the vast quantity of information which will be thrown at you, especially during the first two years.

It is NOT a science degree - you won't gain much in the way of news on the latest in lab research. You'll also learn psychology, sociology, ethics, medical law, communication skills etc. It's not all about anatomy, physiology, pharmacology etc.

Practical skills - taught at university and practiced on fellow students and willing patients in hospital/GP settings.

Qualification - gives you provisional registration with the GMC which is upgraded to full registration upon successfully completing your FY1 year.

Expectations - you are told to act like a doctor-in-training from day 1 of the degree. No one will care if a biomed student is caught puking/pissing somewhere inconvenient on a Friday night - the GMC cares if medical students do this however.
thank you very much!
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JacobAlevels
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(Original post by musty345)
The first year or two of medicine and biomed courses are usually pretty similiar. That's why first year biomeds can transfer to medicine, and second year medical students can intercalate and do a biomed BSc. They start differing massively from the third year onwards, with medicine emphasising patient contact.
i didn't know biomed students could transfer to medicine. do you know where I can find more information on that? I've already searched but didn't find anything much. like a list of medical schools that allow this? much appreciated.
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musty345
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(Original post by JacobAlevels)
i didn't know biomed students could transfer to medicine. do you know where I can find more information on that? I've already searched but didn't find anything much. like a list of medical schools that allow this? much appreciated.
Only a very small amount of schools allows this for their very top biomedics. I know Newcastle lets a very small number of biomedics transfer to medicine after first year. But from what I've been told, it's very competitive and any work experience you've done before university doesn't count. I wouldn't use it as a way to do medicine. Your best bet is probably to either just apply for medicine, or finish your biomed degree and apply for graduate entry.

I know this isn't biomed, but Bradford also do a clinical medicine degree in which the top 20 students can transfer to Leeds for medicine.
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