Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    young people who speak with received pronunciation are often wrongly assumed to be 'posh.'

    The consequences at school and later life are usually negative - particularly on a social level.

    Have you ever seen/been a/the person being judged or mistreated for being 'posh'?

    Is that fair?
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    How are the consequences for later life usually negative? I imagine most employers would think better of the person with received pronunciation than the person 'tawkin' loik dis' (to exaggerate the difference ).
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I actually think it's quite cute when a lot of the kids in my school in Year 7 speak with RP. By the middle of Year 8 they usually get teased so much for it that all of them, with the exception of the 'hardcore', usually switch to a more 'common' accent in order to fit in. I do teach at a fairly rural school.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I would never describe myself as posh as it seems like a weird word to associate yourself with. Occasionally I get the impression that this is what people think of me, and sometimes it's more explicit. I don't really care.

    Being called posh is nowhere near as bad as being called a chav or common. Yes people shouldn't take the piss out of you because you speak well, but if you apply yourself you will be able to go far in life. Whereas those who are talked down to and stereotyped because of their background or dress sense, they are seen as worth less and I don't know what people gain from using the word "chav". :dontknow:

    People are always going to find ways to pick on you (weight, hair, clothes, hobbies), wouldn't it be better if you were picked on because they perceived you as more successful than them?
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    It deeply saddens me that the English language has deteriorated over the years. Replaced by street words such as 'init.' However, the most worrying thing is how many applicants in jobs either don't have proper sentence structure or English in their CV; or further than that how many of them seriously under perform in interviews, swearing etc.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Because I speak properly (innit), I have somehow, don't ask me, managed to receive the nickname PoshPants. Just because I use the English Language correctly. Oh dear.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Most of the people I know who have genuinely plummy 'posh' accents... actually are posh :P
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Actually when I was at school in the north, it was the people whose parents had moved into the area and who consequently had a more RP accent that always got chosen to do readings in church, to narrate the Nativity, to speak the lead parts in shows, etc. I'm sure the teachers weren't doing it consciously, it just gave those people an advantage and I'm sure there are many other little advantages for having a 'nicer' accent.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ripper-Roo)
    I would never describe myself as posh as it seems like a weird word to associate yourself with. Occasionally I get the impression that this is what people think of me, and sometimes it's more explicit. I don't really care.

    Being called posh is nowhere near as bad as being called a chav or common. Yes people shouldn't take the piss out of you because you speak well, but if you apply yourself you will be able to go far in life. Whereas those who are talked down to and stereotyped because of their background or dress sense, they are seen as worth less and I don't know what people gain from using the word "chav". :dontknow:

    People are always going to find ways to pick on you (weight, hair, clothes, hobbies), wouldn't it be better if you were picked on because they perceived you as more successful than them?
    Who calls people 'common'? Maybe you really are posh... :dontknow:

    I think you're right though, in that humans are going to notice things about others that stray away from the perceived norm. Some kids tease those who are different not just because of being posh/chav, but numerous things like being short, fat, their hairstyle, their clothes, you could go on and on. It's this need to fit in, this need to not be different, and to discourage those who stray away from the norm that we see in kids especially, but in humans of all ages sometimes...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Pride)
    Who calls people 'common'? Maybe you really are posh... :dontknow:

    I think you're right though, in that humans are going to notice things about others that stray away from the perceived norm. Some kids tease those who are different not just because of being posh/chav, but numerous things like being short, fat, their hairstyle, their clothes, you could go on and on. It's this need to fit in, this need to not be different, and to discourage those who stray away from the norm that we see in kids especially, but in humans of all ages sometimes...
    It is just something I've observed over the years. It's normally said about them, but the word is used nonetheless.

    Yeah, kids should be told that it's not a bad thing to be different. I was called weird a lot as I grew up, now I'd see it as a compliment!
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    I speak with RP in an area where street language is the 'norm'. Although I don't get singled out because of it, it's often the topic amongst my friends or people I know. 'She's so posh!' or 'Talk a bit of slang'. I wouldn't say it's anyway a negative thing and also I don't consider myself to be posh, I'm just quite glad I haven't succumbed to speaking with 'innits' and 'fams' :lol:

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by uktotalgamer)
    It deeply saddens me that the English language has deteriorated over the years. Replaced by street words such as 'init.' However, the most worrying thing is how many applicants in jobs either don't have proper sentence structure or English in their CV; or further than that how many of them seriously under perform in interviews, swearing etc.
    People have always used slang though. It doesn't mean it's accepted as proper English, it is just how some people speak. If you speak well it gives you an advantage

    Maybe you've been watching too much Jeremy Kyle! Very few people can't put sentences together on a C.V. or swear in interviews. Even if this is the case, perhaps you should be happy as this gives you a higher chance of securing a job.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PythianLegume)
    How are the consequences for later life usually negative? I imagine most employers would think better of the person with received pronunciation than the person 'tawkin' loik dis' (to exaggerate the difference ).
    I think the OP means socially people will assume they're just some rah, but you're right that they're probably more likely to be picked up in employment than people using 'blud' or 'innit bruv'
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    The secondary school I went to is in East London and I got called "posh" A LOT there. It hasn't affected me in anyway. I liked that I had a "posh" voice. The ability to speak in this way is incredibly advantageous.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    people call me posh sometimes but i don't find it insulting.
    (Original post by uktotalgamer)
    It deeply saddens me that the English language has deteriorated over the years. Replaced by street words such as 'init.' However, the most worrying thing is how many applicants in jobs either don't have proper sentence structure or English in their CV; or further than that how many of them seriously under perform in interviews, swearing etc.
    Slang has been around forever, its not a new thing that this generation has created.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kiss)
    I think the OP means socially people will assume they're just some rah, but you're right that they're probably more likely to be picked up in employment than people using 'blud' or 'innit bruv'
    I know people might assume that, but it hardly warrants saying the effects are 'usually negative'
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    I don't think thatI talk that posh but everyone in work and even customers have commented on me being "posh" it does annoy me a bit sometimes especially when people start talking like I do but ahh well I've gotten used to it
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ripper-Roo)
    People have always used slang though. It doesn't mean it's accepted as proper English, it is just how some people speak. If you speak well it gives you an advantage

    Maybe you've been watching too much Jeremy Kyle! Very few people can't put sentences together on a C.V. or swear in interviews. Even if this is the case, perhaps you should be happy as this gives you a higher chance of securing a job.
    Selfie has been added to the English Dictionary...

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    I never met any young posh people during school, every single person I ever spoke to had a Welsh Swansea valley accent, same as me. Everyone knew who the wealthy kids were, but we all spoke the same. Bit boring really.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    TBH

    Speaking 'common' is a lot less effort than speaking properly,

    I'd rather just say yeaaa/yeah, than to say 'yes'... saying yes requires a lot more effort, cba tbh
 
 
 
Poll
Who do you think it's more helpful to talk about mental health with?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.