Advanced Higher Chemistry Help- Naming transition metal complexes

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Suzi.Letham
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Hey guys. So, I have been having some trouble getting the hang of this. I know there is a set of rules you need to follow. The first rule, according to scholar and the powerpoints that my teacher used, is 'If the complex is a salt, the name of the positive ion (cation) is written first.'

I gather that I should really already know this, but how do I know if the complex is a salt?

Also, if anyone knows any sites I could use to practice naming transition metal complexes that'd be great.
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Nirgilis
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Moved to the chemistry forum for you . You're more likely to get an answer here
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Suzi.Letham
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Thankyou


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Bradshaw
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A salt is made from a cation and an anion. I suppose if you are looking at the name then the most obvious thing is that the compound will clearly contain two elements. The element of the cation is written just as the element, but the anion element name changes to show it is an ion.

E.g. Iron chloride (not iron chlorine) indicates that the compound is ionic. You can also get other endings such as copper sulphate (-ate indicates oxygen) or potassium permanganate.

In general other clues to spot that you have a salt is that it will be made up of metals and non metals.

Hope this helps!

Ps cool pic
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deedee123
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(Original post by Suzi.Letham)
Hey guys. So, I have been having some trouble getting the hang of this. I know there is a set of rules you need to follow. The first rule, according to scholar and the powerpoints that my teacher used, is 'If the complex is a salt, the name of the positive ion (cation) is written first.'

I gather that I should really already know this, but how do I know if the complex is a salt?

Also, if anyone knows any sites I could use to practice naming transition metal complexes that'd be great.
chemguide is pretty good.

http://www.chemguide.co.uk/inorganic...ons/names.html
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charco
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(Original post by Suzi.Letham)
Hey guys. So, I have been having some trouble getting the hang of this. I know there is a set of rules you need to follow. The first rule, according to scholar and the powerpoints that my teacher used, is 'If the complex is a salt, the name of the positive ion (cation) is written first.'

I gather that I should really already know this, but how do I know if the complex is a salt?

Also, if anyone knows any sites I could use to practice naming transition metal complexes that'd be great.
Check this out.

Complex, radical and simple ions

It may help ...
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Saadm0530
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Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1389210298.314855.jpg
Views: 333
Size:  190.0 KB anyone know how to do this ? And explain why


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Borek
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How is ΔG related to the reaction spontaneity?
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Saadm0530
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(Original post by Borek)
How is ΔG related to the reaction spontaneity?
Is it not feasible when ΔG = 0?


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Borek
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ΔG = 0 means equilibrium.
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Exon
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(Original post by Saadm0530)
Is it not feasible when ΔG = 0?
It's not feasible if ΔG is positive (if the reaction is isolated that is).

ΔG = 0 implies equilibrium, as stated above.
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Saadm0530
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(Original post by Exon)
It's not feasible if ΔG is positive (if the reaction is isolated that is). This is more of a question of which reactions are more feasible though (and the implications).

ΔG = 0 implies equilibrium, as stated above.
Wait that's confusing haha! Could you explain that in a different way?


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Exon
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(Original post by Saadm0530)
Wait that's confusing haha! Could you explain that in a different way?
(Original post by Exon)
It's not feasible if ΔG is positive (if the reaction is isolated that is). This is more of a question of which reactions are more feasible though (and the implications).

ΔG = 0 implies equilibrium, as stated above.
Ignore the bit in green. After reading the question again, I realise that's not the point of the question at all. You're meant to identify the temperature at which decomposition changes from being unfeasible to feasible. That would normally be when ΔG goes from positive to negative with the zero point representing equilibrium. However, the equation given on the sheet is NOT decomposition, it is the opposite therefore you want ΔG on the sheet to go from negative to positive (feasible to unfeasible). It wouldn't matter which way you go on this question since it wants an approximate temperature. However, if they were to say they want a temperature range, you would have to consider this.

1. Are you familiar with the definition of Gibbs free energy?

2. At equilibrium, a reversible reaction goes in both directions with no net change. If you change the direction of the reaction, ΔG changes sign so to say that it goes in both directions equally implies that the overall ΔG cancels out to 0.
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rubby11
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(Original post by Exon)
It's not feasible if ΔG is positive (if the reaction is isolated that is).

ΔG = 0 implies equilibrium, as stated above.

would u happen to have really old higher chemistry pastpapers ?
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Exon
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(Original post by rubby11)
would u happen to have really old higher chemistry pastpapers ?
I'm afraid not.
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rubby11
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#16
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thts okay thanks anyways
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