ellawhite4686
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hi, i am in year 11 and i am having to make my a level choices . i think that i would like to go to university to do a law degree.

my gcse predicted grades are as follows:

english lit- A
english lang- A
maths- A
biology-A
physics-A*
chemistry-A
spanish-A
french-A
rs-A
history-A

i have just done my mocks and got a b in chemistry, the rest a's, and an a* in english language.

i am thinking of doing the following a levels:

history
psychology
english language
spanish

would consider religious studies instead of psychology.

would these be suitable for law, if not please make suggestions!!
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benq
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(Original post by ellawhite4686)
hi, i am in year 11 and i am having to make my a level choices . i think that i would like to go to university to do a law degree.

my gcse predicted grades are as follows:

english lit- A
english lang- A
maths- A
biology-A
physics-A*
chemistry-A
spanish-A
french-A
rs-A
history-A

i have just done my mocks and got a b in chemistry, the rest a's, and an a* in english language.

i am thinking of doing the following a levels:

history
psychology
english language
spanish

would consider religious studies instead of psychology.

would these be suitable for law, if not please make suggestions!!
History and Spanish are perfect but instead of English Language and Psychology I would consider: English Literature, Philosophy, Government & Politics, Economics, Mathematics, Religious Studies, Classics. All of the above are really good essay A-levels while Mathematics is a universally respected subject which develops all the skills desirable for a legal career. Good luck!
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Crazy Jamie
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(Original post by benq)
History and Spanish are perfect but instead of English Language and Psychology I would consider: English Literature, Philosophy, Government & Politics, Economics, Mathematics, Religious Studies, Classics. All of the above are really good essay A-levels while Mathematics is a universally respected subject which develops all the skills desirable for a legal career. Good luck!
I disagree. Not with the suitability of the stated subjects; just with the general idea that they should be chosen ahead of the current subjects. Unless someone is contemplating a collection of truly 'weak' subjects at A-Level, most choices will be fine in and of themselves. Results are more important than subject choices. Arguably english language and psychology are 'weaker' than history and spanish, but personally if a CV landed in front of me with that selection of A-Levels, I wouldn't think twice about it. If those are the subjects that the OP is most interested in and/or is best at, I don't see an issue with that choice at all. I would go for religious studies rather than psychology if the OP doesn't have a real preference between them, as RE is a subject that will encourage more in the way of critical thinking, but it's not a major issue either way. Picking two of your suggested subjects over english language and psychology is not going to be the difference between the OP getting a training contract/pupillage or not, whereas getting poor results in those subjects may turn out to be a detriment that the OP could certainly do without.
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Rascacielos
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Universities are not lying when they say that they aren't too bothered by which subjects you studied for A-level, as long as they are academic ones. I know people who have studied three sciences and are doing exceptionally well in their law degrees.

History, Spanish and English are all strong traditional subjects, respected by universities for law. Religious Studies and Psychology perhaps a little less so, although given that your other three subjects are very academic ones, neither would be a problem.

But, if you are inclined to take science subjects, or one of them (I studied Maths as one of my A-levels), then do so and don't be worried that universities will look down on it.
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colourpurple
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(Original post by benq)
History and Spanish are perfect but instead of English Language and Psychology I would consider: English Literature, Philosophy, Government & Politics, Economics, Mathematics, Religious Studies, Classics. All of the above are really good essay A-levels while Mathematics is a universally respected subject which develops all the skills desirable for a legal career. Good luck!
This is the best advice.


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colourpurple
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^ addition: However if you think that you wouldn't get an A/A* in any of the suggested ones, stick with your original options of Psychology and English Lang.

Ideal situation: GOOD A level choices (eg history/Spanish) + good grades in them.
If that's not possible then you want: Satisfactory A level choices + good grades in them.


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arrowhead
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(Original post by Crazy Jamie)
I disagree. Not with the suitability of the stated subjects; just with the general idea that they should be chosen ahead of the current subjects. Unless someone is contemplating a collection of truly 'weak' subjects at A-Level, most choices will be fine in and of themselves. Results are more important than subject choices. Arguably english language and psychology are 'weaker' than history and spanish, but personally if a CV landed in front of me with that selection of A-Levels, I wouldn't think twice about it. If those are the subjects that the OP is most interested in and/or is best at, I don't see an issue with that choice at all. I would go for religious studies rather than psychology if the OP doesn't have a real preference between them, as RE is a subject that will encourage more in the way of critical thinking, but it's not a major issue either way. Picking two of your suggested subjects over english language and psychology is not going to be the difference between the OP getting a training contract/pupillage or not, whereas getting poor results in those subjects may turn out to be a detriment that the OP could certainly do without.
(Original post by Rascacielos)
Universities are not lying when they say that they aren't too bothered by which subjects you studied for A-level, as long as they are academic ones. I know people who have studied three sciences and are doing exceptionally well in their law degrees.

History, Spanish and English are all strong traditional subjects, respected by universities for law. Religious Studies and Psychology perhaps a little less so, although given that your other three subjects are very academic ones, neither would be a problem.

But, if you are inclined to take science subjects, or one of them (I studied Maths as one of my A-levels), then do so and don't be worried that universities will look down on it.
Agree with both of these!

Some universities, mostly top ones like the Oxbridge, LSE, UCL, prefer students who've done more 'traditional' subjects such as: Economics, English Lit, History, Sciences, Maths, etc.

If you are applying for Law to these kinds of universities, you should keep your subjects in the realm of strong traditional subjects. 'Soft' subjects to be avoided would be Drama, Dance, Music, and Business, Design, etc.
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Rascacielos
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(Original post by arrowhead)
Agree with both of these!

Some universities, mostly top ones like the Oxbridge, LSE, UCL, prefer students who've done more 'traditional' subjects such as: Economics, English Lit, History, Sciences, Maths, etc.

If you are applying for Law to these kinds of universities, you should keep your subjects in the realm of strong traditional subjects. 'Soft' subjects to be avoided would be Drama, Dance, Music, and Business, Design, etc.
As far as I'm aware, strong traditional subjects are preferred by any university which is going to give you a respectable law degree. And that extends beyond the Russell Group.

Even if you are "lucky enough" to find a university that accepts softer subjects, you'd be better off studying the harder ones in preparation for one of the toughest degrees out there. Subjects like drama and design won't prepare you in the slightest for a law degree. At least hard subjects will give you some sort of academic grounding.
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arrowhead
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(Original post by Rascacielos)
As far as I'm aware, strong traditional subjects are preferred by any university which is going to give you a respectable law degree. And that extends beyond the Russell Group.

Even if you are "lucky enough" to find a university that accepts softer subjects, you'd be better off studying the harder ones in preparation for one of the toughest degrees out there. Subjects like drama and design won't prepare you in the slightest for a law degree. At least hard subjects will give you some sort of academic grounding.
Yes, in preparation for a law degree, academic or 'harder' subjects are generally preferred. But from my understanding of it, and perhaps my understanding is flawed, but the OP was more concerned with whether his/her chosen subjects would be acceptable if/when he/she chose to apply for Law at university.

Considering that to be the main query, it is only more selective universities that would reject applicants for not having sufficiently academic subjects. There are many, many more law schools that would accept a student for merely having a pulse and the ability to pay the fees. If the OP would choose to apply to one of these universities, his/her chosen subjects at A-Level would be irrelevant from an admissions perspective.
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Rascacielos
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(Original post by arrowhead)
Yes, in preparation for a law degree, academic or 'harder' subjects are generally preferred. But from my understanding of it, and perhaps my understanding is flawed, but the OP was more concerned with whether his/her chosen subjects would be acceptable if/when he/she chose to apply for Law at university.

Considering that to be the main query, it is only more selective universities that would reject applicants for not having sufficiently academic subjects. There are many, many more law schools that would accept a student for merely having a pulse and the ability to pay the fees. If the OP would choose to apply to one of these universities, his/her chosen subjects at A-Level would be irrelevant from an admissions perspective.
I don't doubt there are some, although I wouldn't quite go to the extent of "many, many".

I appreciate the OP's main query was on admissions, but I don't see why a little friendly advice isn't helpful. Besides, from an admissions perspective, I'm not sure how well you can promote in a personal statement that studying Drama and IT have really sparked your enthusiasm for an academic law degree, and prepared you well for it too.

Without wanting to sound like a snob, I assume the "lesser" universities do have some standards when it comes to making offers of places.
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by ellawhite4686)

i am thinking of doing the following a levels:

history
psychology
english language
spanish

would consider religious studies instead of psychology.

would these be suitable for law, if not please make suggestions!!
You have very good but not stellar GCSE predictions. The key thing for securing a place on a good law course, is grades. Only when you have the highest achievable grades, is the issue of subject choice, the cherry on the top of the cake. An A in expressive dance is better than a B in further maths. Accordingly, the first thing to ask yourself and to ask your teachers is in what subjects do you think you will get the best grades?

Most of the posters here are treating top grades as a given, perhaps because they have achieved them themselves, but you have to earn those grades. You should not do anything to make that task more difficult.
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