Remedium
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Hi Guys,

Does anyone have any tips for Religious Studies A level?

I'm really struggling on the topic of Judeao-Christian influences on philosophy of religion - I'm not a religious person at all, and being made to read tonnes of religious texts and memorise quotations for the exam, under timed conditions is too much.

I prefer the more pure philosophical parts to the course so I was wondering if it was all right to skip the above topic and concentrate on those instead? Since, there are 4 questions in the exam?

Thanks
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Katie97
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What are you struggling with? I might be able to help you since I found the Judeo-Christian section the easiest of all the ones we have studied so far.

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Remedium
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(Original post by Katie97)
What are you struggling with? I might be able to help you since I found the Judeo-Christian section the easiest of all the ones we have studied so far.

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I just don't understand what exactly we're supposed to know because, although we're not requried to read any texts, we're advised to by teachers and in books.. I'm not familiar with any religious books so it's really worrying for me. I'm also having trouble with what to include in essays but it's important that I get the information first..

Any help would be great.. This topic is definitely the most difficult for me.
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Katie97
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Maybe you'd find printing out the specification helpful? That's what I did! It's ok you don't need to believe in the bible or God. I'll bulletpoint what the specification says you need to know and then in brackets I will briefly say what it is or you can google them for more detail

- How the bible represents God as involved with his creation
(This is basically how God communicates with us e.g through prayers, miracles and sending Jesus)

- The imagery of God as craftsman

- The concepts of omnipotence, omniscience and omnipresence

- the concept of 'Creatio Ex Nihilo'
(It means 'creation from nothing')

- Why is God good?
(gives us freewill, provides us with an afterlife, forgives us, gives us purpose, sacrificed his son, created us, rewards good things and punishes bad, parables, prayers, miracles)

- Euthyphro Dilemma
(The argument for whether God commands things because they are good or are things good because God commands them)

The only thing you need to research yourself is in which areas of the Bible things I mentioned in the 5th bulletpoint are from for example you are expected to know that God created the world and it says so in Genesis.

I probably wasn't much help but I hope I made things clearer for you. It can be a pain I know, it sucks.



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Remedium
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(Original post by Katie97)
Maybe you'd find printing out the specification helpful? That's what I did! It's ok you don't need to believe in the bible or God. I'll bulletpoint what the specification says you need to know and then in brackets I will briefly say what it is or you can google them for more detail

- How the bible represents God as involved with his creation
(This is basically how God communicates with us e.g through prayers, miracles and sending Jesus)

- The imagery of God as craftsman

- The concepts of omnipotence, omniscience and omnipresence

- the concept of 'Creatio Ex Nihilo'
(It means 'creation from nothing')

- Why is God good?
(gives us freewill, provides us with an afterlife, forgives us, gives us purpose, sacrificed his son, created us, rewards good things and punishes bad, parables, prayers, miracles)

- Euthyphro Dilemma
(The argument for whether God commands things because they are good or are things good because God commands them)

The only thing you need to research yourself is in which areas of the Bible things I mentioned in the 5th bulletpoint are from for example you are expected to know that God created the world and it says so in Genesis.

I probably wasn't much help but I hope I made things clearer for you. It can be a pain I know, it sucks.



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Thanks - it has certainly cleared a few things. It is really stressful, especially finding quotes to mention in the exam etc.

I have one more question - in the essay, how much would you write and what would you say in the introduction because that's where I seem to go astray
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xvFIRESTORMvx
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Hi I'm doing RS at AS at the moment too (I'm doing the Philosophy of Religion and Religious Ethics Units)
For the Essays, I would say that you should aim to get at least 2 sides of A4 for the A01 question (The 25 Mark one) and for the A02 try and get at least 1 side of A4 done. Most the teachers at my 6th Form say to try and do at least a side and a half for A02, but I've managed to get 8's and 9's by doing 1 side or slightly less, so I think it's down to content and to an extent your writing style as well. Try and use as many key words as you can where appropriate, and try to remember who wrote what books and stuff (E.G. Plato - The Republic), because that can get you an extra mark here and there too.
As for introductions, I'm lucky enough that one of my teachers is a marker for OCR, and he says that intros aren't really necessary because the examiner already knows what you are going to be/supposed to be writing about, therefore they just waste valuable time. I guess it's up to you if you want to add an intro in but you don't have to and it won't necasailly get you anymore marks or anything.
Hope I helped
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Remedium
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(Original post by xvFIRESTORMvx)
Hi I'm doing RS at AS at the moment too (I'm doing the Philosophy of Religion and Religious Ethics Units)
For the Essays, I would say that you should aim to get at least 2 sides of A4 for the A01 question (The 25 Mark one) and for the A02 try and get at least 1 side of A4 done. Most the teachers at my 6th Form say to try and do at least a side and a half for A02, but I've managed to get 8's and 9's by doing 1 side or slightly less, so I think it's down to content and to an extent your writing style as well. Try and use as many key words as you can where appropriate, and try to remember who wrote what books and stuff (E.G. Plato - The Republic), because that can get you an extra mark here and there too.
As for introductions, I'm lucky enough that one of my teachers is a marker for OCR, and he says that intros aren't really necessary because the examiner already knows what you are going to be/supposed to be writing about, therefore they just waste valuable time. I guess it's up to you if you want to add an intro in but you don't have to and it won't necasailly get you anymore marks or anything.
Hope I helped
Wow that was really insightful - Most of what you've said is the opposite to what I've been told and to be honest, your advice makes a lot more sense; especially if your teacher is an examiner.

What would you usually write in an intro for, say, a question asking you to explain the Allegory of the Cave?
Personally, I would start off by explaining how Plato was a rationalist (explain that term), an absolutist (explain that term again) and a dualist (explain that one). Then I'd talk about his book (The Republic) and his objections of the physical world.

I find this rather time consuming but it would be really useful to know how you would approach this question? (For the body and conclusion as well? )

Thanks!

(I'm doing the Phil. of Religion and Ethics too - finding it rather interesting so far)
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Katie97
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(Original post by Remedium)
Wow that was really insightful - Most of what you've said is the opposite to what I've been told and to be honest, your advice makes a lot more sense; especially if your teacher is an examiner.

What would you usually write in an intro for, say, a question asking you to explain the Allegory of the Cave?
Personally, I would start off by explaining how Plato was a rationalist (explain that term), an absolutist (explain that term again) and a dualist (explain that one). Then I'd talk about his book (The Republic) and his objections of the physical world.

I find this rather time consuming but it would be really useful to know how you would approach this question? (For the body and conclusion as well? )

Thanks!

(I'm doing the Phil. of Religion and Ethics too - finding it rather interesting so far)
For explaining the allegory of the cave I think I'd just go straight into it and analyse what each thing symbolises e.g the soldiers holding the puppets up could symbolise politicians or philosophers who don't believe in the realm of forms who try to make you falsely believe things.


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xvFIRESTORMvx
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Ok say the question is something like 'Explain Plato's Allegory of the Cave - 25 Marks', if anything for any introduction don't ever write something like 'This essay is this going to be about...' because of the time impact. A good intro has to kind of launch itself into the question and topic straight away, so you should try and mention any relevant background information in relation to the question so stuff like what book the Philosopher wrote which contains whatever you're writing about, and a little about their beliefs, again thinking if it's relevant to this specific question.
This was my introduction (bare in mind this was the first of any assessments I did so it's not as good as some of my later ones, but still overall I got a B- which isn't too bad for a first time try I guess, and anything in Green is an addition I thought of):
"Plato's allegory of the cave is a story that Plato used to exlain his ideas of the Forms. To Plato, the Forms are the archetypes of all the things that we see in this world - the world of appearances. Plato beilieved that there were two worlds (could also use the word 'realms' in place of 'worlds') this world that we live in, the realm of appearances and also the realm of the Forms, which exists independantly of our own world. Some of Plato's ideas of the Forms are quite difficult to understand, so that is why Plato created the Allegory of the Cave."
If was going to imporve this more I would also mention that Plato was a dualist and explain as this is relevant due to already mentioning that Plato believed in the existance of two worlds, and also that this allegory was found in Plato's book 'The Republic'. As for Plato being a Rationalist and Absolutist, not that it's not important, but if the question is asking you to explain the Allegory of The Cave it's more important to get into explaining the story and all it's symbols however I can't see it doing you any bad, if you write about it just don't spend ages on it. Those things would perhaps be better to have more about in a question about Plato's beliefs about Forms because it helps the examiner to see that you have a clearer understanding of where Plato got his understanding from and why he believed what he did. But again it wouldn't be bad to write about it, especially as they don't do negative marking. His rejections of the outside world could come in useful when explaining the symbolism in the allegory.

As for the main body of the text, I wrote it each paragraph on one part of the story going through chronologically, first telling what actually happened in the story, then writing another paragraph trying to explain as much as possible about all the symbolism in that particular part, then moving to the next part of the story. Some people wrote out all the story first then did the all the symbols, but I found it easier to do it bit by bit but what you do is up to you. Do whatever makes most sence to you and whatever allows you to get the most effective essay written, for me I'm not a very fast writer, which is quite annoying because I end up not finishing most tests/assessments I do, so my grades don't always reflect what I know in my head, so I have to think about how I do tests carefully. Find what works for you, especially as time is very limited in the exam.
Heres what I wrote for my 2nd and 3rd Paragraphs (the 1st was my Intro above):
"At the beginning of the Alleory of the Cave, there are some prisoners in a cave who are chained up in such a way that they can only look forwards. They have been here their entire lives and have only ever seen shadows on the wall infront of them, which they perceive to be actual objects. They can see these shadows because behind them there is a fire which casts light onto the wall they can see, and infront of the fire is a small wall and walkway where people walk up and down it holding up models of objects." So as you can see, I haven't really done much analysing here, rather I've just re-told most of the story, but that's where my next paragraph comes in.
"The prisoners represent ordinary people, the 'oi poloi' who don't question anything that much and just accept whatever they are told. In some ways, Plato might be trying to say that it's not all their fault that they are like this as they are in chains which they cannot free themselves from and for some unknown reason, have been there like that their entire lives. Inside the cave the only light is the fire, so the dimness of the cave perhaps represents their minds as being 'dim' in a sense, as they can't see the truth. The people holding objects are representitve of politicians, as they aren't bound by chains to be there, but continually feed the prisoners lies, as the shadows on the wall represent false reality and false truths that we don't recognise as being wrong. The prisoner's minds are being polluted with these ideas by politicians, which also represents Plato's stance on politics, that it shouldn't be politicians who run the country, but philosophers as they are interested in the needs of the whole people and won't be corrupted by the prospects of power and wealth, unlike the majority of politicians."
As you can see, the 3rd paragraph is full of explanation trying to get each and individual symbol explained from that small chunk of the story. Then all you have to do is go through the rest of the story progressivly, one paragraph re-telling the story, the next explaining as much symbolism as possible.
Mention that inside the cave that the blindness of the returning freed prisoner is representitive of anamnesis again representitive of Plato's idea that we don't clearly remember things from the past like how he believes that we once resided in the realm of the Forms and upon incarnation here we forgot what most of the Forms really are.
I didn't get to write a conclusion, but I suppose you could give a short summary of the story and it's meanings, though if you explain the story well enough I don't think you'd need a really long conclusion for this one or anything.
Sorry it took me a while to find my folder and everything, then type this out but still, I hope it was of some use for you and everything
What other A-Levels are you doing at the moment?
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Remedium
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(Original post by xvFIRESTORMvx)
Ok say the question is something like 'Explain Plato's Allegory of the Cave - 25 Marks', if anything for any introduction don't ever write something like 'This essay is this going to be about...' because of the time impact. A good intro has to kind of launch itself into the question and topic straight away, so you should try and mention any relevant background information in relation to the question so stuff like what book the Philosopher wrote which contains whatever you're writing about, and a little about their beliefs, again thinking if it's relevant to this specific question.
This was my introduction (bare in mind this was the first of any assessments I did so it's not as good as some of my later ones, but still overall I got a B- which isn't too bad for a first time try I guess, and anything in Green is an addition I thought of):
"Plato's allegory of the cave is a story that Plato used to exlain his ideas of the Forms. To Plato, the Forms are the archetypes of all the things that we see in this world - the world of appearances. Plato beilieved that there were two worlds (could also use the word 'realms' in place of 'worlds') this world that we live in, the realm of appearances and also the realm of the Forms, which exists independantly of our own world. Some of Plato's ideas of the Forms are quite difficult to understand, so that is why Plato created the Allegory of the Cave."
If was going to imporve this more I would also mention that Plato was a dualist and explain as this is relevant due to already mentioning that Plato believed in the existance of two worlds, and also that this allegory was found in Plato's book 'The Republic'. As for Plato being a Rationalist and Absolutist, not that it's not important, but if the question is asking you to explain the Allegory of The Cave it's more important to get into explaining the story and all it's symbols however I can't see it doing you any bad, if you write about it just don't spend ages on it. Those things would perhaps be better to have more about in a question about Plato's beliefs about Forms because it helps the examiner to see that you have a clearer understanding of where Plato got his understanding from and why he believed what he did. But again it wouldn't be bad to write about it, especially as they don't do negative marking. His rejections of the outside world could come in useful when explaining the symbolism in the allegory.

As for the main body of the text, I wrote it each paragraph on one part of the story going through chronologically, first telling what actually happened in the story, then writing another paragraph trying to explain as much as possible about all the symbolism in that particular part, then moving to the next part of the story. Some people wrote out all the story first then did the all the symbols, but I found it easier to do it bit by bit but what you do is up to you. Do whatever makes most sence to you and whatever allows you to get the most effective essay written, for me I'm not a very fast writer, which is quite annoying because I end up not finishing most tests/assessments I do, so my grades don't always reflect what I know in my head, so I have to think about how I do tests carefully. Find what works for you, especially as time is very limited in the exam.
Heres what I wrote for my 2nd and 3rd Paragraphs (the 1st was my Intro above):
"At the beginning of the Alleory of the Cave, there are some prisoners in a cave who are chained up in such a way that they can only look forwards. They have been here their entire lives and have only ever seen shadows on the wall infront of them, which they perceive to be actual objects. They can see these shadows because behind them there is a fire which casts light onto the wall they can see, and infront of the fire is a small wall and walkway where people walk up and down it holding up models of objects." So as you can see, I haven't really done much analysing here, rather I've just re-told most of the story, but that's where my next paragraph comes in.
"The prisoners represent ordinary people, the 'oi poloi' who don't question anything that much and just accept whatever they are told. In some ways, Plato might be trying to say that it's not all their fault that they are like this as they are in chains which they cannot free themselves from and for some unknown reason, have been there like that their entire lives. Inside the cave the only light is the fire, so the dimness of the cave perhaps represents their minds as being 'dim' in a sense, as they can't see the truth. The people holding objects are representitve of politicians, as they aren't bound by chains to be there, but continually feed the prisoners lies, as the shadows on the wall represent false reality and false truths that we don't recognise as being wrong. The prisoner's minds are being polluted with these ideas by politicians, which also represents Plato's stance on politics, that it shouldn't be politicians who run the country, but philosophers as they are interested in the needs of the whole people and won't be corrupted by the prospects of power and wealth, unlike the majority of politicians."
As you can see, the 3rd paragraph is full of explanation trying to get each and individual symbol explained from that small chunk of the story. Then all you have to do is go through the rest of the story progressivly, one paragraph re-telling the story, the next explaining as much symbolism as possible.
Mention that inside the cave that the blindness of the returning freed prisoner is representitive of anamnesis again representitive of Plato's idea that we don't clearly remember things from the past like how he believes that we once resided in the realm of the Forms and upon incarnation here we forgot what most of the Forms really are.
I didn't get to write a conclusion, but I suppose you could give a short summary of the story and it's meanings, though if you explain the story well enough I don't think you'd need a really long conclusion for this one or anything.
Sorry it took me a while to find my folder and everything, then type this out but still, I hope it was of some use for you and everything
What other A-Levels are you doing at the moment?
Wow, again, that was brilliant - really good to see how other students approach a topic and essay. Thanks, I would +rep more if I could :')
I'm taking Maths, Human Biology and Salters Chemistry.
I find the other subjects surprisingly easier than R.S. which is weird but hopefully I'll grow out of it as time goes.

What topic are you doing at the moment, in R.S.?
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xvFIRESTORMvx
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(Original post by Remedium)
Wow, again, that was brilliant - really good to see how other students approach a topic and essay. Thanks, I would +rep more if I could :')
I'm taking Maths, Human Biology and Salters Chemistry.
I find the other subjects surprisingly easier than R.S. which is weird but hopefully I'll grow out of it as time goes.

What topic are you doing at the moment, in R.S.?
At my 6th Form, each class has to have 2 teachers which is good in some ways and bad in others, but this means we do 2 topics simultaneously. At the moment we're doing The Teleolgical Argument and The Problem of Evil. What topic(s) are you doing now?
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Hey there guys, sorry to interrupt, but I was wondering if i could get some advice on a level theology? What is it like, in terms of workload and difficulty, and what do u think of it as a whole?
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Remedium
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(Original post by xvFIRESTORMvx)
At my 6th Form, each class has to have 2 teachers which is good in some ways and bad in others, but this means we do 2 topics simultaneously. At the moment we're doing The Teleolgical Argument and The Problem of Evil. What topic(s) are you doing now?
Ahh I see - we're slightly behind then; unless you're also doing the Ethics part at the same time? We're doing Ethics and Phil. of Religion together (with separate teachers)
For Ethics, we're doing Christian Ethics (Moral authority etc.)
For Phil. of Religion, we've just finished the Telological Argument and moving on to the Cosmological (I think).
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Hey there guys, sorry to interrupt, but I was wondering if i could get some advice on a level theology? What is it like, in terms of workload and difficulty, and what do u think of it as a whole?
I'm in Year 12 doing the AS and at the moment I'll say that I'm not finding it as hard as I thought I was going to, but I do seem to be quite lucky in that I appear to be a bit more 'wired' to do it than the majority of people in my class, not that they're thick or anything, just things seem to click with me faster than the others (my teacher told me this, I'm not trying to sound like I'm bragging ), so personally I don't think that it's massively difficult although it is the most difficult subject I do (I also do Classics, ICT and Art) as some concepts take a bit longer to get your head round than others.

In terms of difficulty, the hardest thing my class has done so far is learning about Immanuel Kant and The Moral Argument (my teacher taught us most of the Kantian Ethics at the same time for this because he said it would make more sense overall), because it changes your perception on perception and so in a way made us question whether anything is real and so the reliablility of empirical methods of gaining information itself, but maybe that's just because my teacher adds some extra stuff in about the topic, so I'm not sure that you'd necassarilly learn the seemingly extra stuff as well, although it is very interesting (this was with my better teacher).

In terms of workload, both of my teachers set homework after almost every lesson, however both seem to routinely forget that they set homework and don't check, or if they do they don't mark it and if you don't do it they don't really do much but that's not really their fault as at my sixth form there isn't that much teachers can do if someone doesn't do their homework, although I hear that some people get kicked out after mocks if they completely fail them and haven't been a decent student, though these could easily be rumours.
As for what the homework itself is, it seems to depend on you're teacher's style of teaching. The better of my teachers generally sets homework that takes no longer than 15-20 mins, but my other teacher usually just prints stuff out and tells us to read and highlight it...

I like it overall, but I think that's mainly because I have the better of my 2 teachers for 6/10 lessons every fortnight, and he puts in alot more effort into his teaching which makes it more enjoyable, + he can be quite funny at times as well which helps , but I think that if I had my other teacher most of the time, I wouldn't enjoy it as much because she lacks enthusiasm most of the time, but I don't know if that's just because she's new to my school or something, but then my other teacher is new as well so really I think for you to enjoy a class it depends on the teacher as an indivdual and how they interact with the class. As for a subject, I think you can enjoy stuff while not liking class so much but having a good teacher does make a massive difference if you're putting in effort.

Oh yeah, you have to be fairly good at writing essays to be successful at it because the exams are essay based.

(Original post by Remedium)
Ahh I see - we're slightly behind then; unless you're also doing the Ethics part at the same time? We're doing Ethics and Phil. of Religion together (with separate teachers)
For Ethics, we're doing Christian Ethics (Moral authority etc.)
For Phil. of Religion, we've just finished the Telological Argument and moving on to the Cosmological (I think).
We've done mostly just the Philosophy of Religion bit - we've completed Plato, Aristotle, Kant's Moral Argument, God the Creator, The goodness of God and The Teleological argument, and we are currently doing The problem of Evil and the Cosmological argument (sorry last time I put we were doing the teleological argument, I forgot we had finished it...). When doing Kant, our teacher said to help us understand it better he would teach us most of the ethics part as well to make it easier for us, but we have't had a test on it yet.
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(Original post by xvFIRESTORMvx)
I'm in Year 12 doing the AS and at the moment I'll say that I'm not finding it as hard as I thought I was going to, but I do seem to be quite lucky in that I appear to be a bit more 'wired' to do it than the majority of people in my class, not that they're thick or anything, just things seem to click with me faster than the others (my teacher told me this, I'm not trying to sound like I'm bragging ), so personally I don't think that it's massively difficult although it is the most difficult subject I do (I also do Classics, ICT and Art) as some concepts take a bit longer to get your head round than others.

In terms of difficulty, the hardest thing my class has done so far is learning about Immanuel Kant and The Moral Argument (my teacher taught us most of the Kantian Ethics at the same time for this because he said it would make more sense overall), because it changes your perception on perception and so in a way made us question whether anything is real and so the reliablility of empirical methods of gaining information itself, but maybe that's just because my teacher adds some extra stuff in about the topic, so I'm not sure that you'd necassarilly learn the seemingly extra stuff as well, although it is very interesting (this was with my better teacher).

In terms of workload, both of my teachers set homework after almost every lesson, however both seem to routinely forget that they set homework and don't check, or if they do they don't mark it and if you don't do it they don't really do much but that's not really their fault as at my sixth form there isn't that much teachers can do if someone doesn't do their homework, although I hear that some people get kicked out after mocks if they completely fail them and haven't been a decent student, though these could easily be rumours.
As for what the homework itself is, it seems to depend on you're teacher's style of teaching. The better of my teachers generally sets homework that takes no longer than 15-20 mins, but my other teacher usually just prints stuff out and tells us to read and highlight it...

I like it overall, but I think that's mainly because I have the better of my 2 teachers for 6/10 lessons every fortnight, and he puts in alot more effort into his teaching which makes it more enjoyable, + he can be quite funny at times as well which helps , but I think that if I had my other teacher most of the time, I wouldn't enjoy it as much because she lacks enthusiasm most of the time, but I don't know if that's just because she's new to my school or something, but then my other teacher is new as well so really I think for you to enjoy a class it depends on the teacher as an indivdual and how they interact with the class. As for a subject, I think you can enjoy stuff while not liking class so much but having a good teacher does make a massive difference if you're putting in effort.

Oh yeah, you have to be fairly good at writing essays to be successful at it because the exams are essay based.



We've done mostly just the Philosophy of Religion bit - we've completed Plato, Aristotle, Kant's Moral Argument, God the Creator, The goodness of God and The Teleological argument, and we are currently doing The problem of Evil and the Cosmological argument (sorry last time I put we were doing the teleological argument, I forgot we had finished it...). When doing Kant, our teacher said to help us understand it better he would teach us most of the ethics part as well to make it easier for us, but we have't had a test on it yet.
Thank you for the response! Would u say its a massive step up from gcse? And do u think its a soft subject? And finally do u think u will score an A in it? I really want to choose AS subjects which I can score an A in
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i did philosophy and ethics for my a level aswell
i found it very hard aswell because i am not religious
i found it easier to write out loads of simple notes and just learnt them off my heart. Then i could explain them using my own reasoning
I was predicted a D but actually came out with an A
i believe it was down to my note taking rememberance
dont panic, whatever happens happens
good luck
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xvFIRESTORMvx
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(Original post by longsightdon)
Thank you for the response! Would u say its a massive step up from gcse? And do u think its a soft subject? And finally do u think u will score an A in it? I really want to choose AS subjects which I can score an A in
It's not a soft subject, Universities regard it quite highly actually so it would be a good one to choose I think.

Massive step-up from GCSE? For me, not really because if you're good at 6 mark questions then the 10 Mark A02 ones don't seem that different, you just have to write a bit more is all, but it's still evaluative and the bigger A01 questions are more to do with just trying to remember stuff and explain what it means and stuff. It's not massively difficult but there is a lot to remember though as for philosophy of religion there are 10 topics, and 10 topics for religious ethics, and no more january exams :cry2: which means it's gonna more difficult from this year onwards, but still do-able, just harder I guess. It helps if you're good at writing but if not it's something that seems to come one day

As for if I'll get an A, I hope to, my ALPS(target grades) is BBC, but most of my teacher's say that because I've been working quite hard, that if I continue it's quite possible I could get an A, the only exception in art where they're saying I'm probably gonna get a B but thats ok.

Do you know what you want to do when you're older or what other subjects you want to pick?
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longsightdon
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(Original post by xvFIRESTORMvx)
It's not a soft subject, Universities regard it quite highly actually so it would be a good one to choose I think.

Massive step-up from GCSE? For me, not really because if you're good at 6 mark questions then the 10 Mark A02 ones don't seem that different, you just have to write a bit more is all, but it's still evaluative and the bigger A01 questions are more to do with just trying to remember stuff and explain what it means and stuff. It's not massively difficult but there is a lot to remember though as for philosophy of religion there are 10 topics, and 10 topics for religious ethics, and no more january exams :cry2: which means it's gonna more difficult from this year onwards, but still do-able, just harder I guess. It helps if you're good at writing but if not it's something that seems to come one day

As for if I'll get an A, I hope to, my ALPS(target grades) is BBC, but most of my teacher's say that because I've been working quite hard, that if I continue it's quite possible I could get an A, the only exception in art where they're saying I'm probably gonna get a B but thats ok.

Do you know what you want to do when you're older or what other subjects you want to pick?
Thanks for the response! I am hoping to apply for Dentistry and I am choosing chemistry, biology, maths but am torn between theology/physics/latin as my fourth as level. My fourth as level must be a subject where I think I can score an A, because I know a B at AS would put me at a disadvantage to other applicants as Dentistry is highly competitive :/
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