manday24
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Hi,
I am currently studying a view from the bridge and I have a timed essay to do next week. However I am really struggling to make essays plans and narrow down my list of 50 quotes to about 20 maximum. I have no problem with anaylsis etc. But I just really need advice to structure essays from Past Paper Questions and what quotes to use.

Any help is greatly appreciated

Thanks
Amanda
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(Original post by manday24)
Hi,
I am currently studying a view from the bridge and I have a timed essay to do next week. However I am really struggling to make essays plans and narrow down my list of 50 quotes to about 20 maximum. I have no problem with anaylsis etc. But I just really need advice to structure essays from Past Paper Questions and what quotes to use.

Any help is greatly appreciated

Thanks
Amanda
I'm feeling a huge pang of nostalgia now I did A View from the Bridge for Higher too

The advice I would give is this: the marks that you get is down to, initially, your understanding of the play and then, most importantly, your analysis. If you have a lot of amazing analysis, you will definitely get an A. Don't worry about putting in thousands of quotes; it's about picking a quote or two and then discussing them in relation to the theme and the question.

I would make a plan for each theme and under each theme write down your quotes/techniques. When you get an essay question - think about the themes in relation to the question and choose the themes which suit the question the best (and then the quotes/techniques within those themes that you wrote down). What does Arthur Miller want to say in A View from the Bridge with regards to a 'significant character/scene' (the essay question in other words).

Techniques are very important as they are often quite complicated, so if you can pinpoint them and then discuss their effect, you should do well.

I often think about high school when doing my essays at university - I think about when my essays at Higher got As. It's usually when I had a good structure: intro, main body and conclusion.

I also had a good structure within my main body paragraphs: Point, Evidence, Explain, Link. I'd make a statement regarding an aspect of a theme which relates to the question, and then I would give my evidence (technique/quote), I would analyse it as much as I could (what this technique/quote means, what it symbolises) and then I'd link my analysis to my main point: how does the analysis of my technique/quote relate to my main point and what else can I do to further it? By this, I mean that you're applying your analysis to the point that you made in your paragraph (your opening sentence) and then going on to say what Miller is saying about the theme etc. Does that make sense?

I can link you to an essay or two from university if you'd like showing Point, Evidence, Explain and Link.

I usually reword my link sentences in my conclusion and combine them to form a 'message'. At the end of the conclusion, I give a judgement - basically, my conclusion (I usually do this within a powerful sentence).
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