User1280516
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Find the AQA GCSE Religious Studies 2018 exam discussion here
Find the Edexcel GCSE Religious Studies 2018 exam discussion here
Find the OCR GCSE Religious Studies 2018 exam discussion here


I've noticed what's losing me marks in mock exams is the way I lay out my answer.

Could someone give me an example of what an answer for the following question should look like?...

'Married couples make better parents'

Do you agree? Give reasons for your answer, showing that you have thought about more than one point of view. Refer to religious arguments in your answer.

I'm not asking you to answer the question for me as I've already done it, but got 4/6 marks and don't know where I went wrong. I'd like full marks, so can anyone create a sort of template for me to follow? I always seem to lose marks when it comes to 'developing' the points I give, how do you do this successfully?

Thank you!
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User1280516
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Guys please answer I need help
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mynameishello
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Are you talking about AQA Specification B? If so I usually follow this structure, and usually get full marks in my 6 markers.
1. Mention your opinion, for example, I disagree that married couples make better parents because I believe that regardless their marital status, parents can provide emotional, and financial support for their child, which in my opinion makes the child have a better quality of life. Moreover, I feel that it is wrong to judge the capability of parents to fulfil their child's needs based on solely their marital status, as everyone is different. Despite being married, many couples may not be able to fulfil the child's needs due to their lack of care, or lack or resources whilst many unmarried couples may be able to provide these. Everyone is different.
2. Then add Christian views to support (and/or disagree depends what quotes you remember and if you have enough time) For example...
Many Christians may disagree with this statement as well, as they are taught that 'there is neither Jew not Greek, slave nor free, male for female...for you are all one in Christ Jesus'(St Paul in his letter to the Galatians). This indicates that Christians are against judging people based on the groups they can be classified as they are all considered as 'one in Christ Jesus'. This may lead Christians to not judge whether married couples are better parents than unmarried as such religious teachings oppose prejudice against people.......
3. Now add an opposing religious argument to the first one from a different religion, and use PEA format so you explain your understanding fully. Again, if you can, add for and against within this different religion.
4. One or two lines of conclusion to sum everything up, however I usually don't do this but if you have spare time it's advisable as it strengthens your structure.



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mynameishello
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Woops I probably wrote too much, and it's probably not the best religious teachings and all, but I thought it up on the spot so sorry about that, but as long as the structure is concerned:
1. Your option in PEA format
2. A religious view in PEA format
3. Another religious view in PEA format which opposes the first one.
4. Sum it up

If you can when you do the first religion, do for and against, e.g some Christians may... Others may however...
And repeat it in the second. However if you don't that should also be alright but it just makes your essay more strong.
Finally, really practise under timed conditions to make sure you can do it in the exam properly


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User1280516
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(Original post by mynameishello)
Woops I probably wrote too much, and it's probably not the best religious teachings and all, but I thought it up on the spot so sorry about that, but as long as the structure is concerned:
1. Your option in PEA format
2. A religious view in PEA format
3. Another religious view in PEA format which opposes the first one.
4. Sum it up

If you can when you do the first religion, do for and against, e.g some Christians may... Others may however...
And repeat it in the second. However if you don't that should also be alright but it just makes your essay more strong.
Finally, really practise under timed conditions to make sure you can do it in the exam properly


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Thank you for taking time to answer, shows you really put thought into it. This is EXACTLY what I was looking for! And yes I'm also doing specification B
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User1280516
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(Original post by mynameishello)
Are you talking about AQA Specification B? If so I usually follow this structure, and usually get full marks in my 6 markers.
1. Mention your opinion, for example, I disagree that married couples make better parents because I believe that regardless their marital status, parents can provide emotional, and financial support for their child, which in my opinion makes the child have a better quality of life. Moreover, I feel that it is wrong to judge the capability of parents to fulfil their child's needs based on solely their marital status, as everyone is different. Despite being married, many couples may not be able to fulfil the child's needs due to their lack of care, or lack or resources whilst many unmarried couples may be able to provide these. Everyone is different.
2. Then add Christian views to support (and/or disagree depends what quotes you remember and if you have enough time) For example...
Many Christians may disagree with this statement as well, as they are taught that 'there is neither Jew not Greek, slave nor free, male for female...for you are all one in Christ Jesus'(St Paul in his letter to the Galatians). This indicates that Christians are against judging people based on the groups they can be classified as they are all considered as 'one in Christ Jesus'. This may lead Christians to not judge whether married couples are better parents than unmarried as such religious teachings oppose prejudice against people.......
3. Now add an opposing religious argument to the first one from a different religion, and use PEA format so you explain your understanding fully. Again, if you can, add for and against within this different religion.
4. One or two lines of conclusion to sum everything up, however I usually don't do this but if you have spare time it's advisable as it strengthens your structure.



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One more question: in the exam would I write a paragraph on my own opinion, one on two religious opinions, and a conclusion? And also is 'evidence', for example quotes, really needed? Because although I'm a Christian and could easily put in a quote I doubt I'll remember a lot from the other religion. So will not including much evidence drop me marks?

thanks
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mynameishello
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Hey, sorry for the late reply! Yes, but I often don't get time for the conclusion so I've never written one, and our teacher showed us a full mark student example answer from last years GCSE and they didn't have one either, so id say focus on your two points of views, after adding the quote really try to analyse them.
Erm I really don't know cause my teacher always makes us add quotes, and I get myself to learn them cause it kind of shows that you know what you're talking about, and gives you the opportunity to show better analysis skills. But depends, I'll ask her again about it and put it down here.


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mynameishello
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Also for your opinion, I've been taught to just put a sentence or two but I was looking at the most recent mark scheme and it says on there that if you write your opinion with a developed reason, or three simple statements, you get 3 marks just for that straight away, like in the 3 markers. So try and do that if you can. But I'd said time practise is so so important cause I had mocks recently and all my answers I wrote them to the standard but couldn't finish! But I didn't practise and I think it was a result of that! Learning from that, I'd say you should also give importance
To timing yourself when you do practises.


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(Original post by mynameishello)
Also for your opinion, I've been taught to just put a sentence or two but I was looking at the most recent mark scheme and it says on there that if you write your opinion with a developed reason, or three simple statements, you get 3 marks just for that straight away, like in the 3 markers. So try and do that if you can. But I'd said time practise is so so important cause I had mocks recently and all my answers I wrote them to the standard but couldn't finish! But I didn't practise and I think it was a result of that! Learning from that, I'd say you should also give importance
To timing yourself when you do practises.


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Thank you, helped me a lot
Guess I should start practicing time management!
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HydraFly
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So is it necessary then to provide examples for 6 mark questions?
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irum2000
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You should use the ADAM structure for these type of questions:
A-agree (why some people/religious believers agree with the statement)
D-disagree(why some people/religious believers disagree with the statement)
A-apply religion(mention a specific religion about what they think of this statement, Include quotes/teachings from the holy book)
M-my opinion(state what your opinion is and why you agree or disagree with it.
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Katehugz
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The UDHR is more important than religious laws
Do you agree? Give reason for your answer, showing that you have thought of more than one point of view. Refer to religiosity arguments in your answer
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sofsferr02
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(Original post by User1280516)
I've noticed what's losing me marks in mock exams is the way I lay out my answer.

Could someone give me an example of what an answer for the following question should look like?...

'Married couples make better parents'

Do you agree? Give reasons for your answer, showing that you have thought about more than one point of view. Refer to religious arguments in your answer.

I'm not asking you to answer the question for me as I've already done it, but got 4/6 marks and don't know where I went wrong. I'd like full marks, so can anyone create a sort of template for me to follow? I always seem to lose marks when it comes to 'developing' the points I give, how do you do this successfully?

Thank you!

Hi! So, according to my RE teacher, examiners are now putting a lot of emphasis on evaluating your thought process and your critical style on essay-style questions. What this means is that, when it comes to these questions, the examiner will try to look for a coherent and logical chain of thought, as well as seeing if you can argue well. So for example, if you have a question that tells you to "evaluate" something, you'll have to give arguments for and against the issue that are linked to each other and to the question. Just try to show the examiner your train of thought in an organised and structured way. The way I do this for 12 mark questions is:

Argument: paragraph 1: 1 point for or against the statement.
Counter: paragraph 2: 1 point against the previous paragraph, which shows a different point of view.
Resolve: paragraph 3: 1 point against paragraph 2, that supports paragraph 1.

Argument: paragraph 4: 1 point for or against the statement.
Counter: paragraph 5: 1 point against the previous paragraph, which shows a different point of view.
Resolve: paragraph 6: 1 point against paragraph 5, that supports paragraph 4.

+Conclusion

In the case of 6 mark questions, you could use the structure of the first three arguments above + conclusion.

For the paragraphs, another thing you must remember is to include evidence and explain everything well, as well as to refer to religious teachings in your answer. For this, you can follow this structure with your paragraphs:

P - point
E - evidence (this could be quotes from religious books or theologists / saints; religious teachings and beliefs; religious costumes and practices; something that backs up your point and shows you're not just making stuff up)
E - explain (it's better to write a lot in detail, than leave it unexplained)
L - link it back to the question

For the conclusions, there's really no structure - just summarise your opinion and best point.

Well, I hope that helps somewhat, any questions, don't hesitate to ask! Good luck with your exams!
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Sub, bro
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For AgainstReligious viewMy own opinionFARM
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Sub, bro
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For
Against
Religious view
My own opinion

FARM
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who cares lmao
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oh my god you're so lucky! i'm doing my gcses now and the religious studies evaluation questions are now 12 markers!
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