Why don't we see quantum weirdness in everyday world?

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MedQ
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Report Thread starter 7 years ago
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Since, we and everything else in our real world are made up of electrons, protons, and electrons, protons, and atoms show quantum weirdness, why don't we ever see such things to happen in real world? Such as, why don't we see part of an apple suddenly disappearing into thin air? Why do classical mechanics never fail to predict motion of things bigger than atoms?
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Implication
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Well as I understand it these sorts of things could very well happen at the macroscopic scale, the probabilities are just unimaginably small at the associated high energies.There's a little thing called the correspondence principle which basically states that quantum models must mirror classical models at sufficiently high energies. I would elaborate but I don't want to risk letting anyone know how little quantum physics I actually know
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MedQ
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(Original post by Implication)
Well as I understand it these sorts of things could very well happen at the macroscopic scale, the probabilities are just unimaginably small at the associated high energies.There's a little thing called the correspondence principle which basically states that quantum models must mirror classical models at sufficiently high energies. I would elaborate but I don't want to risk letting anyone know how little quantum physics I actually know
Sorry about belated reply. And thank you very much for answering.
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Melthusa
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Implication has a good rough idea of what goes on by his explanation. So I'll just add to that.

You are correct in your basic assumptions about quantum mechanics and it's perhaps best to look at systems as many simple quantum mechanical systems. Each system has a small probability of being something (an observable to be precise here). If you think of adding more and more systems and consider the average or (expected) value of the system, it eventually reaches a stage where it reaches a limit. This, is what classical mechanics is revealed to be; working with the expectation values of systems.
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