Reaction between Sold Sodium Bromide and Concentrated Sulfuric Acid Watch

ps1265A
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So, the reaction is:

NaBr + H2SO4 ---> NaHSO4 + HBr

I don't understand how this is a redox reaction, none of the oxidations states change when I look at the reaction above!
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EierVonSatan
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Your equation is missing something

But no, you're quite correct that is not a redox reaction. There is another reaction between NaBr and H2SO4 that is a redox reaction though :eek:
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ps1265A
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(Original post by EierVonSatan)
Your equation is missing something

But no, you're quite correct that is not a redox reaction. There is another reaction between NaBr and H2SO4 that is a redox reaction though :eek:
Copied my equation straight from the text book.
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EierVonSatan
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(Original post by ps1265A)
Copied my equation straight from the text book.
Well, you copied it down incorrectly :p: (or the textbook is wrong)

NaBr + H2SO4 ---> NaHSO4 + HBr
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ps1265A
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(Original post by EierVonSatan)
Well, you copied it down incorrectly :p: (or the textbook is wrong)

NaBr + H2SO4 ---> NaHSO4 + HBr
Woops! Didn't notice, sorry

Nevertheless, the oxidation states remain the same.
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charco
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(Original post by ps1265A)
Woops! Didn't notice, sorry

Nevertheless, the oxidation states remain the same.
Yes, as EVS stated this is not a redox reaction, BUT there is another competing reaction which is...
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ps1265A
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(Original post by charco)
Yes, as EVS stated this is not a redox reaction, BUT there is another competing reaction which is...
Yup, I understand it now! There's another reaction that occurs that is a redox reaction.

I've got one more question which is not related to this topic:

My book states that one of the physical properties of haloalkanes is that "the main intermolecular forces of attraction are dipole-dipole attractions and van der Waals forces."

I understand that the chlorine, bromide and iodine form dipole-dipole attractions, but doesn't flourine form hydrogen bonding as a haloalkane?
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Borek
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Generally speaking hydrogens attached to carbon don't create hydrogen bonds.
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ps1265A
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(Original post by Borek)
Generally speaking hydrogens attached to carbon don't create hydrogen bonds.
But hydrogen attached to carbon forms a polar molecule which has the potential of forming hydrogen bonds with other molecules.
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