Standard nuclear notation for particle physics help.

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FarmerMan
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I have a few questions about what actually is standard notation for Edexcel A2 Unit 4 Physics.

First of all, how should I write a proton as: 11p+ or as 11H+?

Secondly, how should I write an anti proton, for most antiparticles you simply put a line _ like that above the symbol, but for a positron (which is the anti-particle of an electron) I have seen it written as just e+.

Thirdly, is this okay as an equation say 42He2+ --> 211p+ + 210n0, I ask because I have only ever seen in mark schemes it written as 42He2+ --> 11p+ + 11p+ + 10n0 + 10n0. The difference being that this one doesn't have a 2 before the neutron and proton.

Fourthly, do you only have to put the mass number and atomic number for elements, neutron and protons, not any other baryon? Or do you even have to put mass and atomic number for neutrons and protons?

Finally, do you always have to put the charge of a particle, even for neutral particles, elements and neutrinos?

Sorry for this many questions, it's just that I cant find any sources which clearly state what the standard notation is, if anyone has any good sources please link. Thankyou for your time
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TheKingOfTSR
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(Original post by FarmerMan)
I have a few questions about what actually is standard notation for Edexcel A2 Unit 4 Physics.
Standard notation isn't a big deal really..its pretty simple. :yy:

For Unit 4 you need to know only the standard notation for the electron,proton,neutron and positron. It would also be better to know the symbols for the quarks: up (u), down (d), charm (c), strange (s), top(t) and bottom (b) as well as for the leptons although if they do question about them (for example you are asked to write a equation for a particle reaction involving a quark), they would most probably provide a table of the quarks and leptons involved with their symbols, so its easy for you.
You need to know the symbols for the antiparticles for the above particles. (Simply put a dash over the symbol for the particle
But for positrons , AVOID having an e with a __ over it. The convention is to use e+)
Also it would be benefitting to know the symbols for the mesons: pion (pi+ pi- pi0) and kion. (k+, k- and k0), but these symbols too mostly be can deduced from the given information in the question.


First of all, how should I write a proton as: 11p+ or as 11H+?
Both are acceptable. But I would prefer to use the 11p symbol for physics. You don't need to have a positive charge sign along with the p. But for electrons we usually write e- (with the negative charge).

Secondly, how should I write an anti proton, for most antiparticles you simply put a line _ like that above the symbol, but for a positron (which is the anti-particle of an electron) I have seen it written as just e+.
Only for the positron you shouldn't put the line over the symbol for the particle. For everything else the line is added.

Thirdly, is this okay as an equation say 42He2+ --> 211p+ + 210n0, I ask because I have only ever seen in mark schemes it written as 42He2+ --> 11p+ + 11p+ + 10n0 + 10n0. The difference being that this one doesn't have a 2 before the neutron and proton.
It is perfectly okay to write it in either way.
If you have any problems/doubts with the marksheme and its suggested answers for a question then go through the examiners report for that question. It would give you a better insight into the marksheme and acceptable answers.

Fourthly, do you only have to put the mass number and atomic number for elements, neutron and protons, not any other baryon? Or do you even have to put mass and atomic number for neutrons and protons?
You don't need to know the symbols of other baryons.
That said, I usually write the numbers for baryons and elements and for the electron only. For the rest it is not needed I think. If you write the numbers (atomic and mass numbers), then you don't need to put in the positive or negative sign.
For example,
11p can be written as p+.
0-1e can be written as e-

Finally, do you always have to put the charge of a particle, even for neutral particles, elements and neutrinos?
Yes. Charge must always be shown. This can either be as a symbol + or - next to the symbol of the particle or as the atomic/Z number.

Sorry for this many questions, it's just that I cant find any sources which clearly state what the standard notation is, if anyone has any good sources please link. Thankyou for your time



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