Is there any chance of sitting GCSE Welsh (Second Language) in England? Watch

chicoinglés
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Hi there,

I am just wondering about this and wondered how hard Welsh as a second language was generally? I am planning to learn Welsh from scratch as my Dad was born in Wales and so was my Nan. I have a degree in Spanish and Italian and A-Levels in French and German so I wondered whether I could pass it ok based on my language learning background? Do you think it's even possible to do a Welsh GCSE (Second Language) not having been born in Wales and not living in Wales?


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chicoinglés
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Gales
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I believe it is possible, but you'd have to be entered as a private candidate and find someone to conduct the oral for you. WJEC does authorise exams in England, so it should theoretically be possible.

Welsh second language (or ail iaith as it's commonly known) is more difficult than French and Spanish at GCSE as Welsh people tend to have more foundation knowledge of the language - we start studying it at age 4. For example, I remember having to read a book, write letters and make posters at GCSE level.

Nevertheless it's not too difficult, they tend to be more relaxed with grammar due to its difficulty. We didn't have to master masculine and feminines, but we were expected to know mutations, plurals (which are difficult in Welsh) and things like that.

I had an A* and absolutely loved GCSE Welsh, so if you have any queries feel free to ask. I also study French and Spanish, so can make comparisons between languages if you want to know more. Welsh is quite different to English, French and Spanish and the vocabulary can sometimes be a mouthful. There are some similarities though like marw (mourir/morir), ffenestr (fênetre in French), pasg (pascua/paquês). The grammar is entirely different though. The verb comes first, so "aeth hi" (she went) - 'aeth' is went and 'hi' is she. In addition to this saying "yes" and "no" is often a headache as you have to conjugate the "yes" and "no" for every person and tense (different yes and no in the past, present and future although informally people just say 'ie' and 'na'). There's also difficullty saying 'that', Dwi'n credu fy mod i'n dwp (fy mod i'n is the "that I am" for "I believe that I am stupid"), whereas for "you" it would be "Dwi'n credu dy fod ti'n dwp". Plus there's differences between the North and the South and you usually need to choose which dialect to study.

I hope I haven't scared you, it's a wonderful language! Be prepared for some linguistic differences though. It's nice to see people outside Wales taking an interest

Pob lwc i ti!
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chicoinglés
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(Original post by Gales)
I believe it is possible, but you'd have to be entered as a private candidate and find someone to conduct the oral for you. WJEC does authorise exams in England, so it should theoretically be possible.

Welsh second language (or ail iaith as it's commonly known) is more difficult than French and Spanish at GCSE as Welsh people tend to have more foundation knowledge of the language - we start studying it at age 4. For example, I remember having to read a book, write letters and make posters at GCSE level.

Nevertheless it's not too difficult, they tend to be more relaxed with grammar due to its difficulty. We didn't have to master masculine and feminines, but we were expected to know mutations, plurals (which are difficult in Welsh) and things like that.

I had an A* and absolutely loved GCSE Welsh, so if you have any queries feel free to ask. I also study French and Spanish, so can make comparisons between languages if you want to know more. Welsh is quite different to English, French and Spanish and the vocabulary can sometimes be a mouthful. There are some similarities though like marw (mourir/morir), ffenestr (fênetre in French), pasg (pascua/paquês). The grammar is entirely different though. The verb comes first, so "aeth hi" (she went) - 'aeth' is went and 'hi' is she. In addition to this saying "yes" and "no" is often a headache as you have to conjugate the "yes" and "no" for every person and tense (different yes and no in the past, present and future although informally people just say 'ie' and 'na'). There's also difficullty saying 'that', Dwi'n credu fy mod i'n dwp (fy mod i'n is the "that I am" for "I believe that I am stupid"), whereas for "you" it would be "Dwi'n credu dy fod ti'n dwp". Plus there's differences between the North and the South and you usually need to choose which dialect to study.

I hope I haven't scared you, it's a wonderful language! Be prepared for some linguistic differences though. It's nice to see people outside Wales taking an interest

Pob lwc i ti!
Thanks a lot for all that info - I will definitely ask you questions if I need any help or clarification about anything


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