Anybody doing/did A2 Political Ideologies? Watch

xxvine
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
if yes.....help!

finding it so harddd and nothing is going in
0
reply
TSR Learn Together
  •  Official Rep
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 years ago
#2
Hi there,

While you're waiting for an answer, did you know we have 300,000 study resources that could answer your question in TSR's Learn together section?

We have everything from Teacher Marked Essays to Mindmaps and Quizzes to help you with your work. Take a look around.

If you're stuck on how to get started, try creating some resources. It's free to do and can help breakdown tough topics into manageable chunks. Get creating now.

Thanks!

Not sure what all of this is about? Head here to find out more.
reply
Automaton
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#3
Report 5 years ago
#3
I'm starting revision for a re-sit in A2 Ideologies. I got a B in the module. Remember that you only have to choose two topics to answer in the exam, so hypothetically you could only revise two ideologies, though that isn't recommended because a question might come up that you don't like. Three would probably be recommended. The best approach to ideologies, I found, was to look into the overall themes of the ideology (e.g. the idea of conserving in, duh, conservatism), and then delving deeper into just what that means (e.g. organicism, moral scepticism, irrationalism), and then from there looking into what some key writers have said on the issue (e.g Disraeli, Burke etc.), and then finally relating all of that to modern politics and political parties and issues. So, to summarise: overall themes, sub-themes, key writers and ideas, relation to contemporary politics (in that order).
Of course, looking at past questions (and answers) is also important, and practicing exam answers and essay plans.
0
reply
xxvine
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#4
(Original post by Automaton)
I'm starting revision for a re-sit in A2 Ideologies. I got a B in the module. Remember that you only have to choose two topics to answer in the exam, so hypothetically you could only revise two ideologies, though that isn't recommended because a question might come up that you don't like. Three would probably be recommended. The best approach to ideologies, I found, was to look into the overall themes of the ideology (e.g. the idea of conserving in, duh, conservatism), and then delving deeper into just what that means (e.g. organicism, moral scepticism, irrationalism), and then from there looking into what some key writers have said on the issue (e.g Disraeli, Burke etc.), and then finally relating all of that to modern politics and political parties and issues. So, to summarise: overall themes, sub-themes, key writers and ideas, relation to contemporary politics (in that order).
Of course, looking at past questions (and answers) is also important, and practicing exam answers and essay plans.
so you can only learn 2 for unit 2 and 4?

Also what text book did you use...exam is june and I have 6 months to learn everything Kinda scared.....

Also we do not need to learn Fascism do we?
0
reply
Automaton
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#5
Report 5 years ago
#5
What I meant by the two topics thing is this: In A2, each module has 4 topics doesn't it? Like, in the "ideologies" module you learn four ideologies (we did conservatism, liberalism, socialism and fascism). But then, in the exam, you only have to answer two sections, and each section is on one ideology. So essentially, although you learn four ideologies in lesson, you only have to answer questions on two of them in the exam. What this means is that you could, essentially, just focus on learning your two favourite ideologies. For example, if you find conservatism and liberalism easier, you could just revise them, and leave the other two. This generally isn't a good idea though, because the question on one of those ideologies that you revised for in the exam might be really hard or obscure (or may simply involve a word you don't know the meaning of, for example). For that reason it was generally agreed upon in my class that it's best to revise three ideologies. This way, you don't have to revise an ideology you don't know very well or don't like, but you still get a choice of two ideologies to talk about in the exam, out of the three that you've revised (so you can choose them based on whichever seems easiest to answer).

We used this textbook: http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1...pf_rd_i=468294
Which is quite good. But most of our info came from stuff we learnt in lesson. If you use a textbook like that one, it's best to also use other sources. Look at past paper exam questions at some of the questions they ask, and then look online or in other areas for things related to it. For instance, on socialism they might ask whether modern day Labour can be considered socialist. For that, you might want to research some history of the Labour party and specific policies, and make mention of the "new Labour" and how it turned away from socialism. Or you might even want to be more daring or original and make the claim, for instance, that labour was never truly socialist. Of course, only make those sorts of assertions if you can back them up, but those sorts of original insights (and not simply regurgitating facts) are likely to improve your grades (again, if you can back them up).

I don't know whether you need to learn fascism. Each college teaches it differently (and I think, depending on the exam board, fascism might not even be a possible topic in some specifications). We were taught fascism, conservatism, liberalism and socialsim. But as far as I'm aware, other colleges have taught their students different ideologies, like anarchism.
0
reply
xxvine
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#6
(Original post by Automaton)
What I meant by the two topics thing is this: In A2, each module has 4 topics doesn't it? Like, in the "ideologies" module you learn four ideologies (we did conservatism, liberalism, socialism and fascism). But then, in the exam, you only have to answer two sections, and each section is on one ideology. So essentially, although you learn four ideologies in lesson, you only have to answer questions on two of them in the exam. What this means is that you could, essentially, just focus on learning your two favourite ideologies. For example, if you find conservatism and liberalism easier, you could just revise them, and leave the other two. This generally isn't a good idea though, because the question on one of those ideologies that you revised for in the exam might be really hard or obscure (or may simply involve a word you don't know the meaning of, for example). For that reason it was generally agreed upon in my class that it's best to revise three ideologies. This way, you don't have to revise an ideology you don't know very well or don't like, but you still get a choice of two ideologies to talk about in the exam, out of the three that you've revised (so you can choose them based on whichever seems easiest to answer).

We used this textbook: http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1...pf_rd_i=468294
Which is quite good. But most of our info came from stuff we learnt in lesson. If you use a textbook like that one, it's best to also use other sources. Look at past paper exam questions at some of the questions they ask, and then look online or in other areas for things related to it. For instance, on socialism they might ask whether modern day Labour can be considered socialist. For that, you might want to research some history of the Labour party and specific policies, and make mention of the "new Labour" and how it turned away from socialism. Or you might even want to be more daring or original and make the claim, for instance, that labour was never truly socialist. Of course, only make those sorts of assertions if you can back them up, but those sorts of original insights (and not simply regurgitating facts) are likely to improve your grades (again, if you can back them up).

I don't know whether you need to learn fascism. Each college teaches it differently (and I think, depending on the exam board, fascism might not even be a possible topic in some specifications). We were taught fascism, conservatism, liberalism and socialsim. But as far as I'm aware, other colleges have taught their students different ideologies, like anarchism.
I see....
I am self teaching you see and i have like less than 6 months to learn everything
the book i was told to get by former students was....
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Political-Id...cal+ideologies
0
reply
Automaton
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#7
Report 5 years ago
#7
(Original post by xxvine)
I see....
I am self teaching you see and i have like less than 6 months to learn everything
the book i was told to get by former students was....
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Political-Id...cal+ideologies
Well I'm resitting the exam one year after I learnt it, and my note keeping was very bad, so most of the information is stuff that I'll have to look up again. So we're in similar boats I think, except my boat's a bit bigger because I'll remember stuff that we did last year as I go along :P

Thanks for showing me this book! It looks better than the one I linked. Quite a lot of money though :/ I might see if my local library has any copies.

I wouldn't worry about learning everything in 6 months, as long as you keep a good timetable and spend some time every day learning.
0
reply
xxvine
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#8
(Original post by Automaton)
Well I'm resitting the exam one year after I learnt it, and my note keeping was very bad, so most of the information is stuff that I'll have to look up again. So we're in similar boats I think, except my boat's a bit bigger because I'll remember stuff that we did last year as I go along :P

Thanks for showing me this book! It looks better than the one I linked. Quite a lot of money though :/ I might see if my local library has any copies.

I wouldn't worry about learning everything in 6 months, as long as you keep a good timetable and spend some time every day learning.
Hey

Yeah the book seems to be the one most are using and its written by the man who writes the exams i think....It's not the most colourful book ever but i guess i need to be more aware that this is A2! LOL

I am on a gap year and self teaching Politics...Ideologies looks really hard tbh ( I am starting learning on Monday)....So much to remember...
How did you do in the AS may i ask? I am doing the AS exams in May...did you learn two topics as well?
0
reply
emma2013
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#9
Report 5 years ago
#9
Hi, I took the ideologies modules for my A2 last year, and I would recommend the Heywood book. The most important thing is to learn about as many philosophers as you can, learn some quotes too if you can manage it, so you can back up your arguments.
0
reply
xxvine
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#10
(Original post by emma2013)
Hi, I took the ideologies modules for my A2 last year, and I would recommend the Heywood book. The most important thing is to learn about as many philosophers as you can, learn some quotes too if you can manage it, so you can back up your arguments.
how many topics did you learn and is the heywood book enough?
0
reply
Automaton
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#11
Report 5 years ago
#11
(Original post by xxvine)
Hey

Yeah the book seems to be the one most are using and its written by the man who writes the exams i think....It's not the most colourful book ever but i guess i need to be more aware that this is A2! LOL

I am on a gap year and self teaching Politics...Ideologies looks really hard tbh ( I am starting learning on Monday)....So much to remember...
How did you do in the AS may i ask? I am doing the AS exams in May...did you learn two topics as well?
I didn't do too well in my subjects at college to be honest (not bad, but not what I wanted, or what I was capable of) because I was pretty lazy and was depressed for some time so I had a lot of time off. I got a B and then a C in the first year. I didn't revise enough. In AS I really can't remember how much I revised, but I don't think I knew about the possibility of only revising half of things. I suggest you look up your exam board's specification and find out how many topics you need to answer in the exam, then revise one more topic than that to be safe.

I don't think ideologies was too hard in comparison to the other stuff. Maybe it's because I find it more interesting, but I actually found it easier than some of the AS stuff. I guess that's probably just because I didn't like learning about specifics like how UK Parliament is run etc; I'd much rather learn about broader topics like ideologies where you can speak about, for example with fascism, its implementation across the whole of Europe, as well as speak about broader ideological concepts, and not just rattle off statistics like how many backbenchers revolted against the Iraq war. From what I can remember I felt like there was much more wriggle room with ideologies. I could remember stuff that I found interesting and incorporate it into the answer, whereas in AS the topics/questions were much harder to do this with (you can't be very broad when you're limited to discussing, for example, how much power the UK executive has) . . . I guess that might be scary for some people but it made me much more relaxed; I felt like I had more room to present an ideological argument and talk about more important issues.

Like Emma said, learn philosophers/key thinkers, learn key concepts and what they mean, try to remember some of the easier quotes, think about how the key concepts have been implemented throughout recent history. That's really it. The only thing then is practicing exam questions so that you have practice forming an argument from these things you've learnt.
0
reply
emma2013
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#12
Report 5 years ago
#12
(Original post by xxvine)
how many topics did you learn and is the heywood book enough?
I learnt 3 out of 4 for the first module, which was a bad idea as all the liberalism questions were naff so I had to answer two 15 markers on socialism which I hadn't revised. I then learnt all 4 for the next module I sat- there's no point trying to guess which topics will/wont come up.

The heywood book will be the only book you need, but you need to learn it thoroughly. You should also get hold of as many past mark schemes as possible, as questions are recycled frequently and they'll give you model answers. Wikiquote is also very useful for gathering a few extra quotes from philosophers to back up certain arguments/points of view
0
reply
xxvine
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#13
(Original post by emma2013)
I learnt 3 out of 4 for the first module, which was a bad idea as all the liberalism questions were naff so I had to answer two 15 markers on socialism which I hadn't revised. I then learnt all 4 for the next module I sat- there's no point trying to guess which topics will/wont come up.

The heywood book will be the only book you need, but you need to learn it thoroughly. You should also get hold of as many past mark schemes as possible, as questions are recycled frequently and they'll give you model answers. Wikiquote is also very useful for gathering a few extra quotes from philosophers to back up certain arguments/points of view
Hey thanks for the reply....How did you revise can I ask? Did you just make notes etc....?

Also do you think I have enough time to revise? The exam is June and I am starting the book from scratch now! I am self teaching btw...
0
reply
xxvine
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#14
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#14
(Original post by Automaton)
I didn't do too well in my subjects at college to be honest (not bad, but not what I wanted, or what I was capable of) because I was pretty lazy and was depressed for some time so I had a lot of time off. I got a B and then a C in the first year. I didn't revise enough. In AS I really can't remember how much I revised, but I don't think I knew about the possibility of only revising half of things. I suggest you look up your exam board's specification and find out how many topics you need to answer in the exam, then revise one more topic than that to be safe.

I don't think ideologies was too hard in comparison to the other stuff. Maybe it's because I find it more interesting, but I actually found it easier than some of the AS stuff. I guess that's probably just because I didn't like learning about specifics like how UK Parliament is run etc; I'd much rather learn about broader topics like ideologies where you can speak about, for example with fascism, its implementation across the whole of Europe, as well as speak about broader ideological concepts, and not just rattle off statistics like how many backbenchers revolted against the Iraq war. From what I can remember I felt like there was much more wriggle room with ideologies. I could remember stuff that I found interesting and incorporate it into the answer, whereas in AS the topics/questions were much harder to do this with (you can't be very broad when you're limited to discussing, for example, how much power the UK executive has) . . . I guess that might be scary for some people but it made me much more relaxed; I felt like I had more room to present an ideological argument and talk about more important issues.

Like Emma said, learn philosophers/key thinkers, learn key concepts and what they mean, try to remember some of the easier quotes, think about how the key concepts have been implemented throughout recent history. That's really it. The only thing then is practicing exam questions so that you have practice forming an argument from these things you've learnt.
Late reply...
Damn sorry to hear that Hope your better now x

Hows revision going? TBH I am thinking of giving up Exam is in June 3 months away) and I have done nothing!
It's too late to learn everything isn't it?:mad:
0
reply
Automaton
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#15
Report 5 years ago
#15
(Original post by xxvine)
Late reply...
Damn sorry to hear that Hope your better now x

Hows revision going? TBH I am thinking of giving up Exam is in June 3 months away) and I have done nothing!
It's too late to learn everything isn't it?:mad:
Don't stress I'm in the same boat. I haven't started yet because I haven't been able to afford the revision books until now (I'm getting the Heywood book next week). Though I have been reading/watching some related stuff without making notes, because I became interested in it (I didn't do it for revision purposes, but I guess what I've been looking into has been useful); stuff such as Christopher Hitchens talking about socialism, or Noam Chomsky, or reading a book that I borrowed from the library called "Conservatism" by Kieron O'hara.

But I'm also resitting my Philosophy exam, and haven't revised for that either D: Next week I'll be getting all the books I need and really getting down and doing some proper revision. I think I'll be fine as long as I do an hour or two every day (and I'll probably end up doing more most of the time, because when I start revising I usually start enjoying it).

I don't think it's too late There's a lot of wriggle room in the ideologies exams so it's not as if you should feel like you have to learn absolutely every little piece of information. I mean I'd say you could probably know the basic philosophies and key concepts of an ideology within a few days. It would only take a few days to, for example, learn about how conservatism is mainly concerned with change, is reactionary, is sceptical both epistemologically and about human nature, is paternalistic, likes traditionalism etc. etc. So really, for three ideologies that's three weeks to get to grips with the basics, and from there-on you just fill your head with as much as possible relating to the ideologies, in terms of quotes and history and contemporary policies.

What I've also started to do is to read the newspaper, and keep a note-book next to me, where if I spot anything that could relate to an ideology, I write it down in the notebook and how it relates to the ideology. For example in a newspaper, it was mentioned that Ed Miliband used the term "one nation" a lot in his 2012 Labour Party Conference speech, and I immediately remembered that that was a conservative term, mostly used by the conservatives of the post-war era (i.e. "one-nation conservatives", those whom Thatcher called "the wets"). So I now have mental ammunition for the argument that modern Labour is not what it once was (i.e. attempting some form of socialism), in the same way that many argue that Labour have been conservative from the time that Blair came into power.

So looking into the news is a helpful thing to do, too. It's especially good because it shows the examiner that you're able to make connections outside of the course, and are not just regurgitating text from a textbook.

I don't think it's too late if you have the time to revise every day
0
reply
xxvine
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#16
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#16
(Original post by Automaton)
Don't stress I'm in the same boat. I haven't started yet because I haven't been able to afford the revision books until now (I'm getting the Heywood book next week). Though I have been reading/watching some related stuff without making notes, because I became interested in it (I didn't do it for revision purposes, but I guess what I've been looking into has been useful); stuff such as Christopher Hitchens talking about socialism, or Noam Chomsky, or reading a book that I borrowed from the library called "Conservatism" by Kieron O'hara.

But I'm also resitting my Philosophy exam, and haven't revised for that either D: Next week I'll be getting all the books I need and really getting down and doing some proper revision. I think I'll be fine as long as I do an hour or two every day (and I'll probably end up doing more most of the time, because when I start revising I usually start enjoying it).

I don't think it's too late There's a lot of wriggle room in the ideologies exams so it's not as if you should feel like you have to learn absolutely every little piece of information. I mean I'd say you could probably know the basic philosophies and key concepts of an ideology within a few days. It would only take a few days to, for example, learn about how conservatism is mainly concerned with change, is reactionary, is sceptical both epistemologically and about human nature, is paternalistic, likes traditionalism etc. etc. So really, for three ideologies that's three weeks to get to grips with the basics, and from there-on you just fill your head with as much as possible relating to the ideologies, in terms of quotes and history and contemporary policies.

What I've also started to do is to read the newspaper, and keep a note-book next to me, where if I spot anything that could relate to an ideology, I write it down in the notebook and how it relates to the ideology. For example in a newspaper, it was mentioned that Ed Miliband used the term "one nation" a lot in his 2012 Labour Party Conference speech, and I immediately remembered that that was a conservative term, mostly used by the conservatives of the post-war era (i.e. "one-nation conservatives", those whom Thatcher called "the wets"). So I now have mental ammunition for the argument that modern Labour is not what it once was (i.e. attempting some form of socialism), in the same way that many argue that Labour have been conservative from the time that Blair came into power.

So looking into the news is a helpful thing to do, too. It's especially good because it shows the examiner that you're able to make connections outside of the course, and are not just regurgitating text from a textbook.

I don't think it's too late if you have the time to revise every day

Oh wow....remember I am starting from scratch! But yeah tomorrow I am officially starting revising. I have 3 full months to learn everything LOL.
You know units 3+4, how many ideologies do you need to learn? Is it like AS Politics where you need to know 2 minimum but its adviasble to learn 3 or 4?

Also what ideologies are the easiest to learn? I want to learn 3, so which one would you recommend to miss? x
0
reply
Illiberal Liberal
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#17
Report 5 years ago
#17
Thought I'd join as I'm also doing A2 Political Ideologies!

How could you only learn 2/4 of the ideologies for the exam? If there are 5 15 markers with 1 for each ideology and one repeated, then 3 45 markers, if you only learn 2/4 you have to hope one of the two is repeated in the 15 markers don't you? :confused:
0
reply
xxvine
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#18
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#18
(Original post by Law-Hopeful)
Thought I'd join as I'm also doing A2 Politics Ideologies!

How could you only learn 2/4 of the ideologies for the exam? If there are 5 15 markers with 1 for each ideology and one repeated, then 3 45 markers, if you only learn 2/4 you have to hope one of the two is repeated in the 15 markers don't you? :confused:
Hmm that's whats confusing me

How you finding politics btw? Have you started revising?
0
reply
Illiberal Liberal
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#19
Report 5 years ago
#19
(Original post by xxvine)
Hmm that's whats confusing me

How you finding politics btw? Have you started revising?
I don't think that idea's very good haha stick with revising them all I think...

I'm finding it very tough I managed to get an A at AS but that was pretty flukey... How about you?

I'm revising by doing notes on: origins, core beliefs, traditions, and key issues of each ideology and I've finished the first four ideologies. Not feeling confident that I could answer questions on them though!
0
reply
xxvine
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#20
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#20
(Original post by Law-Hopeful)
I don't think that idea's very good haha stick with revising them all I think...

I'm finding it very tough I managed to get an A at AS but that was pretty flukey... How about you?

I'm revising by doing notes on: origins, core beliefs, traditions, and key issues of each ideology and I've finished the first four ideologies. Not feeling confident that I could answer questions on them though!
Yeah maybe your right

Erm I am on a gap year but self teaching politics.....tbh not going well. Not done anything yet Going to the library tomorrow to start. I have 3 months to learn 2 units! Scary
Are you using the Heywood book? Also I am thinking of just not doing the exam anymore....Don't think I have enough time Sad thing is I have paid already to sit the exam!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Cardiff University
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Wed, 27 Mar '19
  • University of Portsmouth
    Postgraduate and Part-Time Open Evenings Postgraduate
    Wed, 27 Mar '19
  • Middlesex University London
    Postgraduate Open Evening Postgraduate
    Wed, 27 Mar '19

How old were you when you first saw porn?

I've never seen it (122)
21.03%
Before I was 12 (200)
34.48%
13 (89)
15.34%
14 (70)
12.07%
15 (40)
6.9%
16 (17)
2.93%
17 (6)
1.03%
18 (5)
0.86%
Between the ages of 19 - 24 (7)
1.21%
Over 25 (1)
0.17%
12 (23)
3.97%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise