How on earth are you meant to afford moving out by yourself?

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uktotalgamer
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#1
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Did some basic calculations and my expenses are coming out at like £1000 a month. Halp guise.
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SMEGGGY
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Save, save and more saving.
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somethingbeautiful
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#3
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Save up for ages and then live on Tesco Value and read by candle light. Even when I was working full time I still couldn't afford it - minimum wage isn't enough if you live in a big city, rents are way too high unless you flat share or live somewhere really bad.
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Viva Emptiness
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Have wealthy parents who can help you start out with a deposit and an allowance.

edit: alternatively, rent a room. You can easily find a room in a nice house for way less than the going rate of the full property and probably share with someone that works away in the week or goes home for the weekends.
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skotch
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It's crazy. Most grads I know are still living with parents as they just can't afford to live out of home yet. Spending at least a year back at home, saving on rent/food/bills, seems to be the norm.
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Le Nombre
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Get just a room in a house or flatshare?

Generally though I think most of my friends have found you need to earn about 16k or more in order to move out, they're starting to move out now though (graduated 2012 and 2013).
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excal9
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I expect when i get a job ill live at home (paying rent obviously) or rent a room/flat for a while to save, save, save!
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Isambard Kingdom Brunel
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I am looking at £700 pcm on basic rent.

Then when you add utility bills such as water, central heating, electric, and then stuff like council tax and internet connection, then that will take me over £1000 pcm.

I also own a car, and a mobile phone, and need food.

Then the off chance that I might, you know, need a new pair of shoes occasionally, or a hair cut.

I cannot afford that while working at Tesco.

That's why I will probably be living with rents forever. :rolleyes:
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krisko31
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Yes, that s a big prob that I will definitely face next year if I'll be in some Uni ... :jive:

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Viva Emptiness
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(Original post by Isambard Kingdom Brunel)
I am looking at £700 pcm on basic rent.

Then when you add utility bills such as water, central heating, electric, and then stuff like council tax and internet connection, then that will take me over £1000 pcm.

I also own a car, and a mobile phone, and need food.

Then the off chance that I might, you know, need a new pair of shoes occasionally, or a hair cut.

I cannot afford that while working at Tesco.

That's why I will probably be living with rents forever. :rolleyes:
Where do you live where the cheapest you can rent is £700 pcm? London? Why don't you rent a room instead - it's a lot cheaper and things like council tax and internet are often included.
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awe
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XYZero
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Trappin
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jelly1000
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#13
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(Original post by uktotalgamer)
Did some basic calculations and my expenses are coming out at like £1000 a month. Halp guise.
You don.t you flatshare until you have a partner to move out with. Very few single people can afford to live on their own.
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WhiteWalker
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Depends on what you went to university to study. I know people who are struggling to move out because they studied media studies degrees and humanities degrees. I am not saying that this all humanities grads will struggle to find a good job, but there's a higher possibility that people who go on to study a STEM subject will be able to find a job and move out quicker than a humanities student would. Most people living on minimum wage salary are either sharing or just getting by. That's the way it is now. I am still at home and I'm 25, but I've needed to for certain personal reasons and also, I don't have a degree. If you are a graduate with a good degree, there's no reason you shouldn't be able to find work quick and afford your own place with your starting salary. If you are that desperate to move out, get a 2nd and 3rd job, work like crazy and move into a nice little flat. It may seem pointless to work 50-60 hours a week, only to realise you're paying for your own place but are rarely ever there. But, it'll get you out of your parents and into your own place. While you're young, there's no reason why you can't work 50-60 hours a week (or more).
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Jjj90
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It wouldn't be so bad if people wouldn't refuse to rent properties to benefits claimants. How are people meant to move away and get a job with 'no DSS' everywhere??
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hothedgehog
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#16
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Find a room in a house - websites like http://uk.easyroommate.com/ are good for finding rooms, and they're much cheaper than getting a flat of your own. Then, learn to live cheaply: food shouldn't cost more than £25 or £30 a week, find cheapest mode of transport to work etc., heating shouldn't be on too long and showers shouldn't be too long to keep bills low, large payments like insurance should be saved for to allow you to pay a cheaper, one off instalment. You get the gist...

I live like this in the South for £700 comfortably, could probably drop that to £600 without too much effort by being a bit more stingy with my petrol and spending only £20 a week on food. Essentially, if you're looking to move out on your own then you're not going to be able to.


(Also, just to point out, I am on a normalish graduate wage so I'm able to save about half my wage every month for a house!).
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Reue
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(Original post by uktotalgamer)
Did some basic calculations and my expenses are coming out at like £1000 a month. Halp guise.
You house share. Takes living expenses down to about £400 a month. Easily livable then
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jelly1000
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(Original post by Jjj90)
It wouldn't be so bad if people wouldn't refuse to rent properties to benefits claimants. How are people meant to move away and get a job with 'no DSS' everywhere??
They are meant to get a job before moving away. And landlords don't like benefit claimants because they are less likely to actually be able to pay the rent.
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Jjj90
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(Original post by jelly1000)
They are meant to get a job before moving away. And landlords don't like benefit claimants because they are less likely to actually be able to pay the rent.
They are deemed, wrongly, to not be able to pay the rent. Housing benefit is stable, you aren't going to lose it.
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jelly1000
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(Original post by Jjj90)
They are deemed, wrongly, to not be able to pay the rent. Housing benefit is stable, you aren't going to lose it.
But it can get cut
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