Why don't the newer colleges use limestone? Watch

Narutopolaris
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Just something that I've been pondering about. In Oxford and Cambridge, the older colleges are all limestone built, but many of the newer ones (e.g. Keble, Robinson, St Hugh's) are red-brick.

I'm not making any judgements, just wondering why that is. Cost? Aesthetics? A desire to difficult?

When did this change occur? Was a sudden transition, or a gradual process? What stimulated this change?

Thanks
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fluteflute
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Here's an interesting video about Keble here:

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nulli tertius
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(Original post by Narutopolaris)
Just something that I've been pondering about. In Oxford and Cambridge, the older colleges are all limestone built, but many of the newer ones (e.g. Keble, Robinson, St Hugh's) are red-brick.

I'm not making any judgements, just wondering why that is. Cost? Aesthetics? A desire to difficult?

When did this change occur? Was a sudden transition, or a gradual process? What stimulated this change?

Thanks
Brick, particularly polychromatic brick was very popular in Victorian England. It was undoubtedly a lot cheaper than limestone. Keble is a product of the high/low church wars in the CofE in the 19th century and money was tight because it could only be raised from the high church party. Likewise it was difficult to raise money for women's education at colleges such as St Hughs.

However there is another reason. Oxford (Headington) limestone wears poorly particularly in polluted environments such as 19th century Oxford. It was the architect "Oxford" Jackson who introduced the harder wearing Clipsham Stone to Oxford but of course it was many years before people knew that it was harder wearing. Much of Oxford has been re-faced in Clipsham in the 20th century. In the late 19th century brick would have been seen as the safer bet for many buildings.
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Narutopolaris
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
Brick, particularly polychromatic brick was very popular in Victorian England. It was undoubtedly a lot cheaper than limestone. Keble is a product of the high/low church wars in the CofE in the 19th century and money was tight because it could only be raised from the high church party. Likewise it was difficult to raise money for women's education at colleges such as St Hughs.

However there is another reason. Oxford (Headington) limestone wears poorly particularly in polluted environments such as 19th century Oxford. It was the architect "Oxford" Jackson who introduced the harder wearing Clipsham Stone to Oxford but of course it was many years before people knew that it was harder wearing. Much of Oxford has been re-faced in Clipsham in the 20th century. In the late 19th century brick would have been seen as the safer bet for many buildings.
Very informative. Thanks
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