GCSEBen
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So I am thinking of studying medicine as a career with the hope of specializing as a radiographer (not sure whether diagnostic or therapeutic) probably therapeutic though.

When looking at the job vacancies just for research purposes I notice that all the Job posts are for consultant radiologists. Is this the only level of radiology and if not how do you reach this stage of radiology as I have looked everywhere and I am not sure what the answer is.

Thank you
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Helenia
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(Original post by GCSEBen)
So I am thinking of studying medicine as a career with the hope of specializing as a radiographer (not sure whether diagnostic or therapeutic) probably therapeutic though.

When looking at the job vacancies just for research purposes I notice that all the Job posts are for consultant radiologists. Is this the only level of radiology and if not how do you reach this stage of radiology as I have looked everywhere and I am not sure what the answer is.

Thank you
You are getting mixed up between radiography and radiology. Radiologists are doctors, radiographers are not. In general, radiographers perform the x-rays/scans, and radiologists interpret the results. Therapeutic radiographers will give patients radiotherapy but the programme will be mapped and run by an oncologist. Interventional radiologists do various procedures under imaging guidance.

If you want to be a radiologist, you have to go to medical school, then complete 2 years of foundation training after graduation before applying to specialty training for radiology, which takes at least 6 years (I'm not sure exactly how long, may be more, especially if you do subspecialty training) before you are a consultant. If you want to be a radiographer then it's a three year degree course, but I don't know much more about the career than that.
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GCSEBen
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(Original post by Helenia)
You are getting mixed up between radiography and radiology. Radiologists are doctors, radiographers are not. In general, radiographers perform the x-rays/scans, and radiologists interpret the results. Therapeutic radiographers will give patients radiotherapy but the programme will be mapped and run by an oncologist. Interventional radiologists do various procedures under imaging guidance.

If you want to be a radiologist, you have to go to medical school, then complete 2 years of foundation training after graduation before applying to specialty training for radiology, which takes at least 6 years (I'm not sure exactly how long, may be more, especially if you do subspecialty training) before you are a consultant. If you want to be a radiographer then it's a three year degree course, but I don't know much more about the career than that.
Thanks that makes a lot of sense!
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GCSEBen
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(Original post by Helenia)
You are getting mixed up between radiography and radiology. Radiologists are doctors, radiographers are not. In general, radiographers perform the x-rays/scans, and radiologists interpret the results. Therapeutic radiographers will give patients radiotherapy but the programme will be mapped and run by an oncologist. Interventional radiologists do various procedures under imaging guidance.

If you want to be a radiologist, you have to go to medical school, then complete 2 years of foundation training after graduation before applying to specialty training for radiology, which takes at least 6 years (I'm not sure exactly how long, may be more, especially if you do subspecialty training) before you are a consultant. If you want to be a radiographer then it's a three year degree course, but I don't know much more about the career than that.
My final question is that once you have finished the speciality in radiology are you immediately known has a consultant radiologist (i.e. is that your job title from the start) because that is the only job title I see for a radiologist. Are you called a consultant radiologist even with 0 experience?
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Helenia
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(Original post by GCSEBen)
My final question is that once you have finished the speciality in radiology are you immediately known has a consultant radiologist (i.e. is that your job title from the start) because that is the only job title I see for a radiologist. Are you called a consultant radiologist even with 0 experience?
No, you have to complete the 6+ years of postgraduate radiology training I mentioned in my last post before you can be a consultant. During that time you'd be known as a radiology registrar/trainee, but you probably won't see those jobs advertised on NHSJobs or anywhere, because they're recruited to nationally via London deanery (http://www.londondeanery.ac.uk/var/r...gy-recruitment) rather than individual hospitals advertising their own jobs.
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Bubble87
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You would be an oncologist if you decided to specialise in cancer as you would also be expected to prescribe concurrent chemo etc.


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