Getting a 2:1 but having less than 300 UCAS points? Watch

RFC1872
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I'm still in first year at uni but I was just having a look at internship programmes and graduate schemes and every one of them wanted at least a 2:1 AND at least 300 UCAS points.

I have 296 UCAS points, so even if I got a 2:1 I couldn't get in a graduate scheme?:confused:
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2ndClass
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I'm sure 4 ums points wouldn't be that big a deal tbh
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euphful
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Depends what you're looking for. The public sector grad schemes I've looked at don't have any A-Level requirements


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Mr_Vain
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(Original post by euphful)
Depends what you're looking for. The public sector grad schemes I've looked at don't have any A-Level requirements


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So you're a mandarin.
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Bill_Gates
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Unlucky, some mind. Some dont. 300 is really the benchmark for most graduate jobs.
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euphful
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(Original post by Mr_Vain)
So you're a mandarin.
Not just civil service lol.

I did an Access course (before starting Politics at Nottingham), which isn't even on the UCAS table (yet), so public sector grad schemes are the only thing I've really looked at for that reason ...


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Mr_Vain
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(Original post by euphful)
Not just civil service lol.

I did an Access course (before starting Politics at Nottingham), which isn't even on the UCAS table (yet), so public sector grad schemes are the only thing I've really looked at for that reason ...


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You mean grad schemes in the private sector don't accept access course qualifications even if you actually did the degree at Nottingham? That is a bit harsh tbf.
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euphful
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(Original post by Mr_Vain)
You mean grad schemes in the private sector don't accept access course qualifications even if you actually did the degree at Nottingham? That is a bit harsh tbf.
Well I'm only first year so my cursory glances may not be totally accurate, but generally to apply for summer internships or grad schemes at places KPMG or RBS or even Proctor and Gamble etc, you generally need a 2:1 (or on track for one in the case of internships), GCSE Maths and English (B or above) and AAB at A-Level, and most people I've spoken say it's the same generally for reputable private sector companies. Admittedly as I said I haven't spent time doing detailed searches or approaching places to see if Access counts (I got enough distinctions to make it equivalent to AAB according to HEFCE for the purposes of student number controls). However, for the NHS graduate management scheme I think the only requirement is a 2:2.

It does suck a bit, I was hoping a 2:1 from somewhere like Nottingham would be enough, but it looks like I may be limited. There are plans to put Access on the UCAS tariff so maybe that will happen before I need to start applying


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Brit_Miller
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(Original post by euphful)
...
It's completely stupid. If you achieve a 2:1 or first class degree, it clearly outweighs a lack of A-levels of slightly lower tariff.
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wannabeaca
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^^ GCSEs only matter for financial-sector companies generally to differentiate.

Normally, the bare minimum for national companies will be BBB at A-level

Regionals will accept BBC most of the time.

Law is normally at least ABB, City of London you're looking at AAB to get a look in but more likely you need AAA+

Banking - AAB

Accounting BBB for most, BBC for regionals and some of the big 4 ask for BB/BC in GCSE Maths/English

Insurance - AAB in mathematical subject

It goes without saying that one needs a 2.1
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Jam'
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(Original post by Brit_Miller)
It's completely stupid. If you achieve a 2:1 or first class degree, it clearly outweighs a lack of A-levels of slightly lower tariff.
Not necessarily. Consistent performance is what these companies are looking for. And although you may become a reformed character after uni for some companies this isn't enough. Do you only work hard at breaking point is the question they may consider.
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euphful
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(Original post by Brit_Miller)
It's completely stupid. If you achieve a 2:1 or first class degree, it clearly outweighs a lack of A-levels of slightly lower tariff.
Agreed. A quick check of Internet forums shows that it is indeed a problem for most people who got to university using Access courses to subsequently get on to grad schemes, with one guy, who got a first from a RG university told that his application had been excellent but he was unable to proceed due to not having the required UCAS points. You'd think the First class honours degree would trump UCAS points! I think the numbers applying for these schemes, as well as how common a 2:1 is nowadays means they need an additional filter. Bluntly, they want to target the people from the top universities, but can't do that overtly, because then you get in to the realms of 'well it's all subjective', so they add this UCAS points requirement as a way of getting around it- higher ranking institutions have higher entry requirements, and without wanting to generalise, there probably aren't too many people who went to London Met with 320 UCAS points. Pretty harsh to me!


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wannabeaca
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(Original post by Jam')
Not necessarily. Consistent performance is what these companies are looking for. And although you may become a reformed character after uni for some companies this isn't enough. Do you only work hard at breaking point is the question they may consider.
I don't think it's so much 'you aren't good enough'. It's just a cheap way to save on recruitment costs.

I don't see why everyone wants to work for the biggest companies. The culture is often poor, you're underpaid per hour, you have long hours and your work isn't varied.

There's no harm to start at a small local firm or a regional firm. I think too many don't realise how few graduate positions there actually are at the top. Biggest employers in the UK proportionally are SMEs.
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euphful
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(Original post by Jam')
Not necessarily. Consistent performance is what these companies are looking for. And although you may become a reformed character after uni for some companies this isn't enough. Do you only work hard at breaking point is the question they may consider.
I don't even think that really comes in to it. When you have 12,000 people applying for 150 places on a grad scheme, they obviously need an additional filter other than '2:1 in any subject' etc.

It does make sense, I just wish it would include my course haha




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Mr_Vain
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(Original post by wannabeaca)
I don't think it's so much 'you aren't good enough'. It's just a cheap way to save on recruitment costs.

I don't see why everyone wants to work for the biggest companies. The culture is often poor, you're underpaid per hour, you have long hours and your work isn't varied.

There's no harm to start at a small local firm or a regional firm. I think too many don't realise how few graduate positions there actually are at the top. Biggest employers in the UK proportionally are SMEs.
Apart from banking and the top law firms in London, I don't see many careers in these big firms (vast majority located in London) that would benefit a graduate much (financially) in London. Money may not be the most important thing to most people, but to me it is the only thing. There are far more effective ways to get well paid or make a lot of money. A lot of these ways do not even require a university degree , but it obviously depends on what you're prepared to do to achieve that dirty sexy money.

Also, there is an idea I believe in: making money work for you instead of you working for money.
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Mr_Vain
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Another point is, yes these people working for the top companies in London have the prestige factor and a sense of achievement. They can hold their heads high and have that nice life in a suburb outside London with wife and kids. But, if you are a greedy sod like me who wants more properties and side ventures for an early retirement (with liquor and vice) then it is not really the most efficient or productive route to go.
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wannabeaca
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(Original post by Mr_Vain)
Another point is, yes these people working for the top companies in London have the prestige factor and a sense of achievement. They can hold their heads high and have that nice life in a suburb outside London with wife and kids. But, if you are a greedy sod like me who wants more properties and side ventures for an early retirement (with liquor and vice) then it is not really the most efficient or productive route to go.
It is for 10 years or so whilst you gain knowledge on a business idea/build up capital without going to the banks and risking everything immediately. That's how people who got properties in the 70s and 80s did it, they saved real hard and then when they got their first one, property was so cheap they could do the same exactly the same way.

But unless you have a business idea, making money out of property is hard for anyone starting out now. Rents don't cover mortgage costs and landlords are simply sitting on a capital investment in the hope it will go up but as soon as that bubble goes pop, many who dream of having a retirement like the one you plan to have, will soon discover they have serious issues.
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rock_climber86
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(Original post by RFC1872)
I'm still in first year at uni but I was just having a look at internship programmes and graduate schemes and every one of them wanted at least a 2:1 AND at least 300 UCAS points.

I have 296 UCAS points, so even if I got a 2:1 I couldn't get in a graduate scheme?:confused:
it's not about ucas points. It's about the numerical tests, interviews etc etc. I have a 2:1 from ucl and 500 ucas points (old system), and i have been struggling to get grad jobs. Currently working in IT. Not ideal but better than being unemployed! Oh and I graduated 3 years ago!
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Mr_Vain
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(Original post by wannabeaca)
<strong>It is for 10 years or so whilst you gain knowledge on a business idea/build up capital without going to the banks and risking everything immediately.</strong> That's how people who got properties in the 70s and 80s did it, they saved real hard and then when they got their first one, property was so cheap they could do the same exactly the same way. <br>
<br>
<strong>But unless you have a business idea</strong>, making money out of property is hard for anyone starting out now. Rents don't cover mortgage costs and landlords are simply sitting on a capital investment in the hope it will go up but as soon as that bubble goes pop, many who dream of having a retirement like the one you plan to have, will soon discover they have serious issues.
Ja, but people assume you have to be in London to do this. I'd say the going to London and doing this model is a bit off these days, people can't afford to buy homes in London and have to move outside it. And you gotta remember that the people like big 4 really don't offer much in terms of salary or quality of work, and i amsaying that having got an offer and assessing what they would offer me in medium-long term. Yes there are higher paid people like bankers who do fine (few and far between). But even they only end up being able to afford to buy a nice little house in Brixton with a wife, kids and a family car in the drive. Most young people rent rooms or if they are lucky flats until they settle down with kids and move to commuter areas outside London. I have seen their faces on their daily commutes in to London, not pretty, not happy.
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Mr_Vain
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(Original post by wannabeaca)
It is for 10 years or so whilst you gain knowledge on a business idea/build up capital without going to the banks and risking everything immediately. That's how people who got properties in the 70s and 80s did it, they saved real hard and then when they got their first one, property was so cheap they could do the same exactly the same way.

But unless you have a business idea, making money out of property is hard for anyone starting out now. Rents don't cover mortgage costs and landlords are simply sitting on a capital investment in the hope it will go up but as soon as that bubble goes pop, many who dream of having a retirement like the one you plan to have, will soon discover they have serious issues.
I disagree, it's if you stick all your eggs into one basket that it becomes a problem. Portfolio diversity is the key. E.g. I bought quite a lot of bitcoins back near when they first started and I have been selling them off as and when I see fit. And in terms of property, it really depends on where you buy, it does not have to be in England. Also, there is the flipping of property for quick resales after acquisition and renovation (even changing the plan of the building if one sees fit to create more space/rooms).
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