zoom09
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I studied Multimedia Design System and have been working as user interface designer since I graduated. Now I want to pursue further in my career and User Experience is what I want to study for my master degree. Currently I only find out a programs from Kingston and Brighton that seems suit my need most.

http://www.kingston.ac.uk/postgradua...html#block9357

http://www.brighton.ac.uk/courses/st...c-pgcert-pgdip

Anyone has experience in this program? Which school can you suggest?\

Thanks
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gbuchanan
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Hi,

It depends on what sort of UX work you want to get into. If you want to look at front-end development with a touch of UX (which seems to be what you are doing at the moment, work-wise?) then the Kingston degree is a pretty good fit for improving your current skills. I believe you're also looking at MSc level - so please correct me if I'm wrong there?

There are other alternatives, and I'll focus on the South-East of England, as you've suggested Sussex and Kingston.

In London, there is:

The University of West London, who recently started a degree in Computing Interaction Design. The team there is relatively new, and their emphasis is on internationalisation and cultural aspects of usability. The fee is (for London) relatively affordable, but the downside is the unit isn't that established and UWL has something of a problem with its institutional reputation.

University College London Interaction Centre (UCLIC), which is an established course (a bit over 10 years old), and which is jointly run between psychology and computer science. It's traditional focus is on the theoretical and formal representation of interactions with computers, and it also has a long-standing interest in Ergonomics. It's the most expensive MSc degree around, though you benefit from a good unit in a leading university. The downside is that the cohort is now rather large, with the intake having been over 70 for some time. Disclosure: I was a founder member of UCLIC, and my PhD supervisors were the last two heads of the Centre.

City University London's Centre of Human-Computer Interaction Design runs the Human-Centred Systems MSc, which is somewhat older. The unit's expertise is in the process of designing interactive systems, capturing requirements, and then designing and evaluating matching systems. The degree is capped to 30 students per year, though that may soon rise to 35 as there are new staff members joining. The unit currently has the same number of faculty (lecturers) as UCL - the limit on numbers ensures that dissertation supervision is by faculty, whereas in larger courses it often is by PhD students. The degree isn't as expensive as UCL, and there are more bursaries available. The pros are that you have a better class size, within a unit with a strong reputation, at a good university that has a world-class business and technology focus. The con is it isn't quite the global university UCL is. Disclosure: I currently work here as the Admissions Tutor for the MSc.

Going back to Kingston, it is more front-end design focussed, and though the team is small, so is the course (typically 10-15 students I believe). It has had a good reputation for the quality of teaching, and the fees are also reasonable. Certainly a good degree, a fair institution (Kingston is behind UCL or City, but well ahead of UWL), and fairly affordable.

The sort of roles you'd get from each vary a bit. At City we graduate a lot of people who go into regular consultancy roles, and previous graduates of ours have been the chair of the UK UXPA, an organisation that we have close links with. We also are the only degree that has deep expertise in information architecture and eliciting requirements. In contrast, UCL's focus on rigorous modelling and formalisation is excellent in safety-critical areas, and they have an expertise in formal psychology that others do not. Kingston has a sharp front-end focus, while UWL is good at cultural aspects.

Sussex is also sound, though it's probably, these days, somewhat behind UCL and City - both of which have grown in the last couple of years, whereas Sussex has been somewhat beset by institutional issues.

If you're interested in talking about the HCS MSc at City, please drop me a line. I also know the admissions tutors at the other courses, and can point you in the right direction to talk to them. It's a growing field, and there is rising demand for graduates. Our own average in the last few years has had the average salary after six months as being over £40k.

One other factor that may be relevant to you. At City half our students at any point in time (i.e. about a third of our new students each year) are part-time. We block our teaching to one day a week as much as possible (in part time mode) to ensure that it's as easy to attend as possible. We've got the largest part-time cohort by some way as a result.

I hope this posting isn't too long. I'd seriously advise hunting around (there are some further MSc degrees outside of London and the SE - e.g. York, St. Andrews).

All the best in your reflections,

George


(Original post by zoom09)
I studied Multimedia System and have been working as user interface designer since I graduated. Now I want to pursue further in my career and User Experience is what I want to study for my master degree. Currently I only find out a programs from Kingston and Brighton that seems suit my need most.

http://www.kingston.ac.uk/postgradua...html#block9357

http://www.brighton.ac.uk/courses/st...c-pgcert-pgdip

Anyone has experience in this program? Which school can you suggest?\

Thanks
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PJDK
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HI gbuchanan, I read your reply to zoom09 with interest. In your experience what undergraduate degree do your students come from? I am looking for an undergraduate degree that combines the arts and computers.Thanks


(Original post by gbuchanan)
Hi,

It depends on what sort of UX work you want to get into. If you want to look at front-end development with a touch of UX (which seems to be what you are doing at the moment, work-wise?) then the Kingston degree is a pretty good fit for improving your current skills. I believe you're also looking at MSc level - so please correct me if I'm wrong there?

There are other alternatives, and I'll focus on the South-East of England, as you've suggested Sussex and Kingston.

In London, there is:

The University of West London, who recently started a degree in Computing Interaction Design. The team there is relatively new, and their emphasis is on internationalisation and cultural aspects of usability. The fee is (for London) relatively affordable, but the downside is the unit isn't that established and UWL has something of a problem with its institutional reputation.

University College London Interaction Centre (UCLIC), which is an established course (a bit over 10 years old), and which is jointly run between psychology and computer science. It's traditional focus is on the theoretical and formal representation of interactions with computers, and it also has a long-standing interest in Ergonomics. It's the most expensive MSc degree around, though you benefit from a good unit in a leading university. The downside is that the cohort is now rather large, with the intake having been over 70 for some time. Disclosure: I was a founder member of UCLIC, and my PhD supervisors were the last two heads of the Centre.

City University London's Centre of Human-Computer Interaction Design runs the Human-Centred Systems MSc, which is somewhat older. The unit's expertise is in the process of designing interactive systems, capturing requirements, and then designing and evaluating matching systems. The degree is capped to 30 students per year, though that may soon rise to 35 as there are new staff members joining. The unit currently has the same number of faculty (lecturers) as UCL - the limit on numbers ensures that dissertation supervision is by faculty, whereas in larger courses it often is by PhD students. The degree isn't as expensive as UCL, and there are more bursaries available. The pros are that you have a better class size, within a unit with a strong reputation, at a good university that has a world-class business and technology focus. The con is it isn't quite the global university UCL is. Disclosure: I currently work here as the Admissions Tutor for the MSc.

Going back to Kingston, it is more front-end design focussed, and though the team is small, so is the course (typically 10-15 students I believe). It has had a good reputation for the quality of teaching, and the fees are also reasonable. Certainly a good degree, a fair institution (Kingston is behind UCL or City, but well ahead of UWL), and fairly affordable.

The sort of roles you'd get from each vary a bit. At City we graduate a lot of people who go into regular consultancy roles, and previous graduates of ours have been the chair of the UK UXPA, an organisation that we have close links with. We also are the only degree that has deep expertise in information architecture and eliciting requirements. In contrast, UCL's focus on rigorous modelling and formalisation is excellent in safety-critical areas, and they have an expertise in formal psychology that others do not. Kingston has a sharp front-end focus, while UWL is good at cultural aspects.

Sussex is also sound, though it's probably, these days, somewhat behind UCL and City - both of which have grown in the last couple of years, whereas Sussex has been somewhat beset by institutional issues.

If you're interested in talking about the HCS MSc at City, please drop me a line. I also know the admissions tutors at the other courses, and can point you in the right direction to talk to them. It's a growing field, and there is rising demand for graduates. Our own average in the last few years has had the average salary after six months as being over £40k.

One other factor that may be relevant to you. At City half our students at any point in time (i.e. about a third of our new students each year) are part-time. We block our teaching to one day a week as much as possible (in part time mode) to ensure that it's as easy to attend as possible. We've got the largest part-time cohort by some way as a result.

I hope this posting isn't too long. I'd seriously advise hunting around (there are some further MSc degrees outside of London and the SE - e.g. York, St. Andrews).

All the best in your reflections,

George
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gbuchanan
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People come from all backgrounds..what's important is a good quality degree (good course, good result). We have had everything from dentists through architects, project managers, artists to programmers and accountants. An ability to interpret words and write clearly is really very important. I'm sure a good degree in creative computing or graphic design would work equally well. If you're looking at post 92 universities, PM me for some directions...some are excellent, some..not.

All the best,

George
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traversolhi
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HCI at the University of Nottingham
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study beats
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(Original post by zoom09)
I studied Multimedia Design System and have been working as user interface designer since I graduated. Now I want to pursue further in my career and User Experience is what I want to study for my master degree. Currently I only find out a programs from Kingston and Brighton that seems suit my need most.

http://www.kingston.ac.uk/postgradua...html#block9357

http://www.brighton.ac.uk/courses/st...c-pgcert-pgdip

Anyone has experience in this program? Which school can you suggest?\

Thanks
i want to become a user experience designer too, where can i get an internship ?
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Liliali
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Hi,
I'm working as a designer, front end developer and UX designer for more than 15 years. I have BA degree in English literature and I have HNC in Graphoc design as well. I'm just wondering with my background, can I apply for Kingston MSc User Experience Design course or not?Also is anyone know what sort of books we need to study before applying for this course?


Many thanks,
Leyla
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gbuchanan
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Hi Leyla,

Apologies for the relatively slow response. You'd certainly be qualified for the Kingston MSc from my understanding. You shouldn't need to read a book beforehand, but I'd recommend Steve Krug's "Don't Make Me Think" as a readable starting point with a number of common-sense issues that are helpful to get you started.

All the best,

George
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nhatlanvan
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Hi gbuchanan,
Your response about the HCI program at City is tremendously helpful to my search for grad school, which help me to submit my application to City today.
Would you please spare more time help me to answer these questions ?
1. Does the ranking of City make its HCI program much less qualified than the one at UCL (I have applied both but still thinking cause the curriculum at UCL is a bit too academic. Also, I saw the high ranking from UCL is the result of its Biology and Psychology Department. I am not sure about its relative link to the HCI course)?
2. Does the school ranking affect the job opportunities of alumni, specifically in the field of HCI? (because I have made a search on Linked In and saw that many UCL grads make it to top companies and user research position, while only a few from City do)
3. How do you compare between HCI grads from City and UCL? Do UCL graduates better to some extent? Are they more competent and high-achieving ?
4. How do you compare between academic staff from UCL and City ? (my search suggests that most professors from UCL scores a higher number of publications and citation, but does this relatively affects their teaching quality ?)
5. How do you compare between the curriculum from UCL and City? Are they all updated HCI theories and practice? (I saw their website quite old school)
6. How do you evaluate the research power of the 2 institutions?

I am going to grad school to better my skill in UX design, especially to become a User Experience Researcher. My goal is to earn exposure to user research in the industry and get an user research position in a global firm. So I am thinking about which institution serves my goal the best.

Thanks a lot for your help. I am really appreciated.

(Original post by gbuchanan)
Hi,

It depends on what sort of UX work you want to get into. If you want to look at front-end development with a touch of UX (which seems to be what you are doing at the moment, work-wise?) then the Kingston degree is a pretty good fit for improving your current skills. I believe you're also looking at MSc level - so please correct me if I'm wrong there?

There are other alternatives, and I'll focus on the South-East of England, as you've suggested Sussex and Kingston.

In London, there is:

The University of West London, who recently started a degree in Computing Interaction Design. The team there is relatively new, and their emphasis is on internationalisation and cultural aspects of usability. The fee is (for London) relatively affordable, but the downside is the unit isn't that established and UWL has something of a problem with its institutional reputation.

University College London Interaction Centre (UCLIC), which is an established course (a bit over 10 years old), and which is jointly run between psychology and computer science. It's traditional focus is on the theoretical and formal representation of interactions with computers, and it also has a long-standing interest in Ergonomics. It's the most expensive MSc degree around, though you benefit from a good unit in a leading university. The downside is that the cohort is now rather large, with the intake having been over 70 for some time. Disclosure: I was a founder member of UCLIC, and my PhD supervisors were the last two heads of the Centre.

City University London's Centre of Human-Computer Interaction Design runs the Human-Centred Systems MSc, which is somewhat older. The unit's expertise is in the process of designing interactive systems, capturing requirements, and then designing and evaluating matching systems. The degree is capped to 30 students per year, though that may soon rise to 35 as there are new staff members joining. The unit currently has the same number of faculty (lecturers) as UCL - the limit on numbers ensures that dissertation supervision is by faculty, whereas in larger courses it often is by PhD students. The degree isn't as expensive as UCL, and there are more bursaries available. The pros are that you have a better class size, within a unit with a strong reputation, at a good university that has a world-class business and technology focus. The con is it isn't quite the global university UCL is. Disclosure: I currently work here as the Admissions Tutor for the MSc.

Going back to Kingston, it is more front-end design focussed, and though the team is small, so is the course (typically 10-15 students I believe). It has had a good reputation for the quality of teaching, and the fees are also reasonable. Certainly a good degree, a fair institution (Kingston is behind UCL or City, but well ahead of UWL), and fairly affordable.

The sort of roles you'd get from each vary a bit. At City we graduate a lot of people who go into regular consultancy roles, and previous graduates of ours have been the chair of the UK UXPA, an organisation that we have close links with. We also are the only degree that has deep expertise in information architecture and eliciting requirements. In contrast, UCL's focus on rigorous modelling and formalisation is excellent in safety-critical areas, and they have an expertise in formal psychology that others do not. Kingston has a sharp front-end focus, while UWL is good at cultural aspects.

Sussex is also sound, though it's probably, these days, somewhat behind UCL and City - both of which have grown in the last couple of years, whereas Sussex has been somewhat beset by institutional issues.

If you're interested in talking about the HCS MSc at City, please drop me a line. I also know the admissions tutors at the other courses, and can point you in the right direction to talk to them. It's a growing field, and there is rising demand for graduates. Our own average in the last few years has had the average salary after six months as being over £40k.

One other factor that may be relevant to you. At City half our students at any point in time (i.e. about a third of our new students each year) are part-time. We block our teaching to one day a week as much as possible (in part time mode) to ensure that it's as easy to attend as possible. We've got the largest part-time cohort by some way as a result.

I hope this posting isn't too long. I'd seriously advise hunting around (there are some further MSc degrees outside of London and the SE - e.g. York, St. Andrews).

All the best in your reflections,

George
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Munimanasa
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Is University of Leicester good for HCI?
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ij1234
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Hi nhatlanvan,Did you get the answer to your questions...because i am in the same situation as you were..could you please give me some insights?
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gbuchanan
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(Original post by nhatlanvan)
Hi gbuchanan,
Your response about the HCI program at City is tremendously helpful to my search for grad school, which help me to submit my application to City today.
Would you please spare more time help me to answer these questions ?
1. Does the ranking of City make its HCI program much less qualified than the one at UCL (I have applied both but still thinking cause the curriculum at UCL is a bit too academic. Also, I saw the high ranking from UCL is the result of its Biology and Psychology Department. I am not sure about its relative link to the HCI course)?
2. Does the school ranking affect the job opportunities of alumni, specifically in the field of HCI? (because I have made a search on Linked In and saw that many UCL grads make it to top companies and user research position, while only a few from City do)
3. How do you compare between HCI grads from City and UCL? Do UCL graduates better to some extent? Are they more competent and high-achieving ?
4. How do you compare between academic staff from UCL and City ? (my search suggests that most professors from UCL scores a higher number of publications and citation, but does this relatively affects their teaching quality ?)
5. How do you compare between the curriculum from UCL and City? Are they all updated HCI theories and practice? (I saw their website quite old school)
6. How do you evaluate the research power of the 2 institutions?

I am going to grad school to better my skill in UX design, especially to become a User Experience Researcher. My goal is to earn exposure to user research in the industry and get an user research position in a global firm. So I am thinking about which institution serves my goal the best.

Thanks a lot for your help. I am really appreciated.
A late response to this, I'm very sorry - I work in Australia now and I'm only on here very intermittently.

1) City and UCL both have good HCI courses, that are well-respected. City's course has always had the highest average salaries following the course, and that continues to date. UCLIC (where I also used to work) is joint between psychology and computer science, with a strong emphasis on psychology; City has a strong emphasis on design methods and processes (note: not design as in drawing!). Whichever is better really depends on your preferred role after the course.
2) City has had quite a lot of folks in top companies - e.g. our former lab manager, a City graduate, is one of the leading people in UX at Google in London. I think you must have a biased sample there. Frankly, I think the two are in that regard somewhat interchangeable. However a lot of our folks are in management UX roles in UX consultancy roles, and we have a very strong portfolio of graduates who have founded, are partners in, or own, UX consultancies.
3) A good friend of mine, who is a UCL graduate, and has been senior at Google, Spotify and Facebook recommends City graduates due to their stronger grounding in UX processes and methods. As noted above, we have stronger salaries after leaving City, and that is independent government data.
4) UCL has very strong publication track records, but that is in part reflected in our different areas. Ann Blandford was my PhD supervisor, as was the previous Head of UCLIC, Harold Thimbleby; I was a founding research fellow at UCLIC; Stephann Makri, currently at City, was a UCL graduate; ditto Simone Stumpf. UCL has taken a strong interest in medical HCI (of which I was part); that attracts strong citation rates, as an area. For comparison, my own interest is in information behaviour, where citation rates are generally lower. That's simply life. Citation rates vary from topic to topic. The point is if you want psychology based HCI, Anna Cox and Duncan Brumby are excellent; in contrast, Simone works on interactions between AI and humans, Stephann on information behaviour like myself. You should be considering the topic fit more than the citation rates.
5) UCL has a foundation in psychology, again; City has a long-standing interest in design processes. That still remains the distinction, and has been going back well over 20 years now!
6) In terms of research power, in absolute terms UCL is stronger, but again this varies from area to area. UCL has never really gained traction in mobile HCI, for example; it's outstanding in medical HCI; City has done a lot on accessibility and HCI - UCL very little; UCL has done a lot on cognitive factors and cognitive modelling; City on requirements gathering and prototype testing. City has primarily had EU funding over the years, UCL mostly EPSRC. It's really apples-and-oranges rather than better and worse. Neither is strong in conventional computing and HCI (e.g. programming) for that you want Glasgow.

The question is, what sort of UX or HCI role are you interested in, long term?
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cherryw47
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(Original post by gbuchanan)
Hi,

It depends on what sort of UX work you want to get into. If you want to look at front-end development with a touch of UX (which seems to be what you are doing at the moment, work-wise?) then the Kingston degree is a pretty good fit for improving your current skills. I believe you're also looking at MSc level - so please correct me if I'm wrong there?

There are other alternatives, and I'll focus on the South-East of England, as you've suggested Sussex and Kingston.

In London, there is:

The University of West London, who recently started a degree in Computing Interaction Design. The team there is relatively new, and their emphasis is on internationalisation and cultural aspects of usability. The fee is (for London) relatively affordable, but the downside is the unit isn't that established and UWL has something of a problem with its institutional reputation.

University College London Interaction Centre (UCLIC), which is an established course (a bit over 10 years old), and which is jointly run between psychology and computer science. It's traditional focus is on the theoretical and formal representation of interactions with computers, and it also has a long-standing interest in Ergonomics. It's the most expensive MSc degree around, though you benefit from a good unit in a leading university. The downside is that the cohort is now rather large, with the intake having been over 70 for some time. Disclosure: I was a founder member of UCLIC, and my PhD supervisors were the last two heads of the Centre.

City University London's Centre of Human-Computer Interaction Design runs the Human-Centred Systems MSc, which is somewhat older. The unit's expertise is in the process of designing interactive systems, capturing requirements, and then designing and evaluating matching systems. The degree is capped to 30 students per year, though that may soon rise to 35 as there are new staff members joining. The unit currently has the same number of faculty (lecturers) as UCL - the limit on numbers ensures that dissertation supervision is by faculty, whereas in larger courses it often is by PhD students. The degree isn't as expensive as UCL, and there are more bursaries available. The pros are that you have a better class size, within a unit with a strong reputation, at a good university that has a world-class business and technology focus. The con is it isn't quite the global university UCL is. Disclosure: I currently work here as the Admissions Tutor for the MSc.

Going back to Kingston, it is more front-end design focussed, and though the team is small, so is the course (typically 10-15 students I believe). It has had a good reputation for the quality of teaching, and the fees are also reasonable. Certainly a good degree, a fair institution (Kingston is behind UCL or City, but well ahead of UWL), and fairly affordable.

The sort of roles you'd get from each vary a bit. At City we graduate a lot of people who go into regular consultancy roles, and previous graduates of ours have been the chair of the UK UXPA, an organisation that we have close links with. We also are the only degree that has deep expertise in information architecture and eliciting requirements. In contrast, UCL's focus on rigorous modelling and formalisation is excellent in safety-critical areas, and they have an expertise in formal psychology that others do not. Kingston has a sharp front-end focus, while UWL is good at cultural aspects.

Sussex is also sound, though it's probably, these days, somewhat behind UCL and City - both of which have grown in the last couple of years, whereas Sussex has been somewhat beset by institutional issues.

If you're interested in talking about the HCS MSc at City, please drop me a line. I also know the admissions tutors at the other courses, and can point you in the right direction to talk to them. It's a growing field, and there is rising demand for graduates. Our own average in the last few years has had the average salary after six months as being over £40k.

One other factor that may be relevant to you. At City half our students at any point in time (i.e. about a third of our new students each year) are part-time. We block our teaching to one day a week as much as possible (in part time mode) to ensure that it's as easy to attend as possible. We've got the largest part-time cohort by some way as a result.

I hope this posting isn't too long. I'd seriously advise hunting around (there are some further MSc degrees outside of London and the SE - e.g. York, St. Andrews).

All the best in your reflections,

George
Hi George,

There is MA User Experience Design course at UAL as well. How would you compared the course in UAL to HIC at City? Thanks
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