Sticky Situation - Advice needed Watch

eku1s
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Hi

I started work experience with a very small IT company in 2011 and have worked on and off with the company, until September 2012 when I started an apprenticeship. I have since completed this and have started the next level (4).

Since my first apprenticeship ended, I had expected my salary to be upped from about £10K, to the industry average for an individual with my experience - £18K. However, I was not.

I have decided that I don't want to continue with the level 4 apprenticeship, and would rather move onto something closer to home (less than the current 64 mile round trip per day), and also pays better. I feel that I am worthy of another job of this average salary.

I therefore have a few questions:


  1. Do I tell my employer that I'm leaving before I have a firm job offer? Bearing in mind that I have made my mind up - I'd rather not stay, even if the salary was increased.
  2. If I apply for jobs, and potential new employers start asking for previous employer details, how can I guarantee that they do not contact my current employer? Relating to my first question, this indicates it may be better to tell them I'm leaving? I've so far been able to combat this by omitting specifics such as the company name, however some application forms insist that you enter these specifics (i.e. NHS)


My main worry is that because there are literally about 5 of us that work for the company, we're such a close knit team, that it's much more awkward/difficult when it comes to leaving the company.

Advice would be much appreciated!

Thanks.
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VoxVeritas
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I suggest you tell prospective employers your full details, but explain that you don't want them to contact your current employers for a reference until you have received a firm offer. This is pretty much standard practice.

In regards to telling them, it's up to you. However, if you let them know now but don't find a position you like until late March you have a very uncomfortable few months ahead. You have to work out any notice stated in your contract, but have no obligation to let them know you are job hunting.

Best of luck
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by eku1s)
Hi

I started work experience with a very small IT company in 2011 and have worked on and off with the company, until September 2012 when I started an apprenticeship. I have since completed this and have started the next level (4).

Since my first apprenticeship ended, I had expected my salary to be upped from about £10K, to the industry average for an individual with my experience - £18K. However, I was not.

I have decided that I don't want to continue with the level 4 apprenticeship, and would rather move onto something closer to home (less than the current 64 mile round trip per day), and also pays better. I feel that I am worthy of another job of this average salary.

I therefore have a few questions:


  1. Do I tell my employer that I'm leaving before I have a firm job offer? Bearing in mind that I have made my mind up - I'd rather not stay, even if the salary was increased.
  2. If I apply for jobs, and potential new employers start asking for previous employer details, how can I guarantee that they do not contact my current employer? Relating to my first question, this indicates it may be better to tell them I'm leaving? I've so far been able to combat this by omitting specifics such as the company name, however some application forms insist that you enter these specifics (i.e. NHS)


My main worry is that because there are literally about 5 of us that work for the company, we're such a close knit team, that it's much more awkward/difficult when it comes to leaving the company.

Advice would be much appreciated!

Thanks.
I'm afraid your logic is all wrong and you are damaging yourself more by not stepping up and telling your current employer you are leaving, but also by leaving before you have another job.

Jobs are hard to come by, and employers prefer to employ people who are working rather than not - unless they need an immediate start. By leaving this job you probably won't be eligible for JSA and unless you get something very quickly, you are likely to find it harder and harder to get another job.

Get another job first, and then when you are made an offer 'subject to references', go and speak to your current employer and ask for a reference. They aren't able to give you a bad reference just because you want to leave, and if you tell them you want to move because of the salary, they have a very simple choice to make.

You can't guarantee your employer won't contact your last employer. However, they won't do it unless they have given you an offer subject to references.
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eku1s
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(Original post by threeportdrift)
I'm afraid your logic is all wrong and you are damaging yourself more by not stepping up and telling your current employer you are leaving, but also by leaving before you have another job.

Jobs are hard to come by, and employers prefer to employ people who are working rather than not - unless they need an immediate start. By leaving this job you probably won't be eligible for JSA and unless you get something very quickly, you are likely to find it harder and harder to get another job.

Get another job first, and then when you are made an offer 'subject to references', go and speak to your current employer and ask for a reference. They aren't able to give you a bad reference just because you want to leave, and if you tell them you want to move because of the salary, they have a very simple choice to make.

You can't guarantee your employer won't contact your last employer. However, they won't do it unless they have given you an offer subject to references.

I appreciate the advice, however I'm not sure you fully understand my question.


(Original post by eku1s)

  1. Do I tell my employer that I'm leaving before I have a firm job offer? Bearing in mind that I have made my mind up - I'd rather not stay, even if the salary was increased.
By that, I was not implying that I would announce I'm thinking of leaving, not to actually leave. Of course, I would never actually leave a job without another firm offer, unless it was so dire that I'd be better off unemployed.

The reason I would want to tell them, is simply because I don't want them receiving a call out of the blue from a prospective employer, asking for a reference or such like, before they even know I'm thinking of moving on.

Is it common for employers to contact your current employer before they've actually spoken to you about the opportunity?
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by eku1s)
The reason I would want to tell them, is simply because I don't want them receiving a call out of the blue from a prospective employer, asking for a reference or such like, before they even know I'm thinking of moving on.

Is it common for employers to contact your current employer before they've actually spoken to you about the opportunity?
No, it doesn't happen.

1) that's why you don't put references on a CV.
2) employers only take up references for the person they offer the job to (except for jobs where you are working with children, then they often take up references for anyone they interview).

Everyone knows the problem of telling your current employer you are looking for other work for before you've got an offer to go to. Therefore, the common practice is

1) not to offer references until requested, and for a CV/covering letter type of application that means only when you are offered the job 'subject to references'.

2) if you are asked to give references during the application process, most employers will have a tick box asking of they can take up references with out asking you first. It doesn't matter if you tick yes or no. If they don't ask, then tell them, 'please do not take up these references without asking me first'. It makes no difference to your application and everyone knows and understands there are many very reasonable reasons that you might not want your current employer to know you are leaving before you have an offer.
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