Occupational therapy or psychological wellbeing practioner?

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blondyx
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Hello all.

I am 24 and have a pychology degree, a years experience as a support worker for LD in a registered home, and a few months experience as a support worker in a mental health hospital working with adolescents

I am now thinking about what to do with the rest of my life as I would like to be more than a support worker. I find mental health really interesting but I can imagine there being alot of burnout quickly. I am thinking about becoming an OT as the working hours are really good (9-5) and the clients and work is very varied. I am also thinking about CBT or becoming a psychological wellbeing practioner. A PWP earns more while training and it only takes a year to be qualified. Also I think it would be really rewarding as cbt is really successful for alot of clients. On the other hand I am introverted and not as good with people compared to others :-/

I have spent over a year trying to decide on what to do and think now I just need to go for something. Does anyone have any advice?

Thanks
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moonkatt
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The usual advice with questions like these is, have you got any experience with either of these roles? That would be a good point to start with
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blondyx
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(Original post by moonkatt)
The usual advice with questions like these is, have you got any experience with either of these roles? That would be a good point to start with
I have seen OT's work but not psychological wellbeing practitioners.

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blondyx
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Anyone else? :-(
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moonkatt
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(Original post by blondyx)
I have seen OT's work but not psychological wellbeing practitioners.

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Sorry, forgot to reply

Do you have any way of getting in touch with a psychological wellbeing practitioner to maybe have a chat with them and see them work?
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River85
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(Original post by blondyx)
Hello all.

I am 24 and have a pychology degree, a years experience as a support worker for LD in a registered home, and a few months experience as a support worker in a mental health hospital working with adolescents

I am now thinking about what to do with the rest of my life as I would like to be more than a support worker. I find mental health really interesting but I can imagine there being alot of burnout quickly. I am thinking about becoming an OT as the working hours are really good (9-5) and the clients and work is very varied. I am also thinking about CBT or becoming a psychological wellbeing practioner. A PWP earns more while training and it only takes a year to be qualified. Also I think it would be really rewarding as cbt is really successful for alot of clients. On the other hand I am introverted and not as good with people compared to others :-/

I have spent over a year trying to decide on what to do and think now I just need to go for something. Does anyone have any advice?

Thanks
Hello,

I can't really offer much other than saying both are roles that I've considered at the past (I am soon to be 29, although I only graduate at 27 as my undergraduate degree took several years to complete due to health/personal difficulties). I'm about to start as a community enabler (LD -supported housing), also work as a Educational Support Worker (mainly provide mentoring), and some voluntary experience as a support worker (vocational rehabilitation for people with brain injuries) and I'm a Samaritans listening volunteer. I'm swaying more toward Occupational Therapy, perhaps training to be a counsellor later in life. But it probably won't be until I'm approaching my mid-30s that I train as an OT due to wanting to work, travel and perhaps do a PT masters.

At 24 you're still young so have plenty of time. Do you think being introverted is the biggest concern wrt become a psychol wellbeing prac? Have you considered becoming a Samaritans listening volunteer? Although a Samaritans offers emotional support/an active listening service, rather than counselling as such, and certainly not CBT, it might still be a role that will give you more confidence in dealing with people.

How are you finding your work as a support worker? Is it something you feel you can do the next few years until you make a decision? Do you find it fufilling enough? From your post I sense you want to make the change now?

I hope you're able to find more information. But with psychological wellbeing practitioners still being relatively new as a profession, I'm not sure if there are many, if any, on this site.
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blondyx
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(Original post by River85)
Hello,

I can't really offer much other than saying both are roles that I've considered at the past (I am soon to be 29, although I only graduate at 27 as my undergraduate degree took several years to complete due to health/personal difficulties). I'm about to start as a community enabler (LD -supported housing), also work as a Educational Support Worker (mainly provide mentoring), and some voluntary experience as a support worker (vocational rehabilitation for people with brain injuries) and I'm a Samaritans listening volunteer. I'm swaying more toward Occupational Therapy, perhaps training to be a counsellor later in life. But it probably won't be until I'm approaching my mid-30s that I train as an OT due to wanting to work, travel and perhaps do a PT masters.

At 24 you're still young so have plenty of time. Do you think being introverted is the biggest concern wrt become a psychol wellbeing prac? Have you considered becoming a Samaritans listening volunteer? Although a Samaritans offers emotional support/an active listening service, rather than counselling as such, and certainly not CBT, it might still be a role that will give you more confidence in dealing with people.

How are you finding your work as a support worker? Is it something you feel you can do the next few years until you make a decision? Do you find it fufilling enough? From your post I sense you want to make the change now?

I hope you're able to find more information. But with psychological wellbeing practitioners still being relatively new as a profession, I'm not sure if there are many, if any, on this site.
Hello, so sorry about the reply..

Wow you have some great experience, well done. What was the degree you completed when you were 27?

Well in my current job I find it extremely difficult to keep trying to engage with patients and to talk to them so much, especially as some of them are not so interested. Also, I am not very good at being assertive and 'pushing' patients to be independant etc. I also find adolescent mental health quite difficult in general as it is so challenging and because situations are never black and white I find it hard to know what to say and how to act sometimes.

Yes I did consider being a samaritans volunteer but can't atm due to shifts already being long and dealing with so much mental health already full time at work.
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choco8722
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Hello
This is an interesting question and one that I weighed up. I wonder what you decided in the end?
I also considered both and decided to apply for both roles as both were competitive at the time. I got offered my first trainee PWP post and was really excited. I am a few months into my course and as an introvert I feel drained but it more because of all the admin hoops you have to jump through every time you have contact with a client. Services do vary but from the cohort of students I am with at the moment this is a sit down, desk job telephone based service. Treatment sessions are only 30 minutes long and by the time you have gone through numerous risk checks, questionnaires etc you may only have 20 minutes left and this can feel a little bit like conveyor belt therapy. it is nice to hear different peoples stories, every day is different and if you like teaching new methods and ideas to people then it is a good job, it is a guidance role and there is a lot of information giving and taking involved. I here that burnout for PWP's does happen and that 2 years is the standard length that people do this for before looking elsewhere. With the OT that now appeals to me more because it sounds a lot more active, you have a varied knowledge and people to support and the pay is better and I believe there is more progression as a PWP I think it is somewhat limited - you can become a supervisor or re train again as a CBT therapist which takes another year. What did you decide in the end?
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CCC75
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Hi OP. Being an OT would be within the same settings where you worked as a support worker but with a more senior role within the multi disciplinary team. Have you enjoyed being in the care home/rehabilitation unit settings? Is there a particular clientele you feel more enthusiastic about working with, e.g. learning difficulties above forensic mental health patients? You can widen your experience by seeking to work with a new clientèle or specialise in one that you are already certain you are motivated by.

A psychological wellbeing practitioner is a clinically based role so has a different feel to the interventions delivered within hospital/care home settings. If you think you might enjoy that change, or want to tick it off as a cv accomplishment, it may be a wise move to make.
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CCC75
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(Original post by CCC75)
Hi OP. Being an OT would be within the same settings where you worked as a support worker but with a more senior role within the multi disciplinary team. Have you enjoyed being in the care home/rehabilitation unit settings? Is there a particular clientele you feel more enthusiastic about working with, e.g. learning difficulties above forensic mental health patients? You can widen your experience by seeking to work with a new clientèle or specialise in one that you are already certain you are motivated by.

A psychological wellbeing practitioner is a clinically based role so has a different feel to the interventions delivered within hospital/care home settings. If you think you might enjoy that change, or want to tick it off as a cv accomplishment, it may be a wise move to make.
Dammit! Just realised the OP was posted in 2014. To whom it may concern anyway...
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