What are the PEOPLE who go to private schools like, versus state schools? Watch

Pride
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'I know this thread has been done to death, but still...'

just playin with ya OP
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The Owl of Minerva
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Is the dichotomy between state and private school people and how they behave always so clear? Aren't their overlaps like posh people in state schools and not very posh people in private schools?
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Ebony19
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(Original post by Red one)
If anything we know more about the value of money, there are no free school dinners, uniforms/trips or free this or free that. Many of my friends have jobs even. :rolleyes:
I think if you're getting free school dinners and free this and that surely you're more likely to know the value of money for lack of it.

And if everything wasn't paid for by mummy and daddy?

No one at a state school ever had a job...ever :rolleyes:
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scrotgrot
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(Original post by Birkenhead)
My experience was that roughly 75% of the people at the private school I went to were ****faces of varying degrees. Since coming to uni, I've noticed that a far higher proportion of the state schooled undergrads I've interacted with have been noticeably more open-minded, less cliquey, more generous, and generally more likeable, and I'm sharing a house next year with four previously state students (one spent sixth form at private but defies the mould). I don't think this has a lot to do with the uni spirit because I've also interacted with a few private schooled students since coming here and they have conformed to my previous experiences.

I would be hesitant about assuming that this goes for all private schools since, without being uppity, mine was an Eton Group full of very rich kiddies with egos the size of small moons constantly surrounded by big imposing buildings. Inevitably, if they don't start out as I did in Croydon, many of them will turn into intolerable gits.
From a state grammar school, I've found the complete opposite at uni (Russell Group), they are much more socially conservative and much less likeable, particularly those points.
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redferry
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(Original post by AspiringMedic8)
I know there has been a thread on private schools versus state schools, but I was wondering if anyone, who has preferably been to both, could tell me if there are any differences in what the people are like, their friendlinesses, personalities, attitudes and any snobbery (if applicable). Did you feel welcome when you arrived? Was bullying more/ less common?

I'm just interested to find out as I know there are a lot of misconceptions in this area.

Thanks
I went to state school and my brother went to private school. Way more socially awkward people at private school.
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Grozdova.
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To be honest, I don't think there's a huge difference to be honest. I go to a normal private school and whilst some of us are a bit naïve and sheltered, there are hardly any posh pupils. I think there's a bit of a misconception with regards to private schools and posh people - most people are just normal there!
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AspiringMedic8
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(Original post by Birkenhead)
My experience was that roughly 75% of the people at the private school I went to were ****faces of varying degrees. Since coming to uni, I've noticed that a far higher proportion of the state schooled undergrads I've interacted with have been noticeably more open-minded, less cliquey, more generous, and generally more likeable, and I'm sharing a house next year with four previously state students (one spent sixth form at private but defies the mould). I don't think this has a lot to do with the uni spirit because I've also interacted with a few private schooled students since coming here and they have conformed to my previous experiences.

I would be hesitant about assuming that this goes for all private schools since, without being uppity, mine was an Eton Group full of very rich kiddies with egos the size of small moons constantly surrounded by big imposing buildings. Inevitably, if they don't start out as I did in Croydon, many of them will turn into intolerable gits.
Still, that's a warped perception that you have of state-educated pupils, since only about 10-15% of state pupils go to university, whereas about 90% of private school pupils do. So you are comparing the top bracket of state pupils with nearly all private school pupils.

Thanks for your advice, anyway

(Original post by Eboracum)
I was state school educated. I hated it. Bullied. All sorts of horrible people went there, bad behaviour, a culture of being cool and being rebellious. My education was so bad that I didn't even know what a private school was until I was about 18 years old. It's that bad. It defines all the stereotypes. And my state school was in a 'Middle Class Area' according to one newspaper. Imagine how bad the ones in the roughest parts must be.

Ideally you'd raise these schools up. But it's easier said than done. I always preferred the idea of the best teachers going to the worst schools, rather than the other way around. But it's a difficult concept, if I was a top teacher, I'd want to be at Harrow or somewhere, not a rough state.

Doesn't seem fair people can just pay to get a better education, in principle I'm against private schools. I'd have no problem bringing down the wealthy to ensure they get the education I got. But I do accept the political realities of private institutions and would not look to close any if I was in government. I always saw those from private schools as smarmy posh boys who don't even know they are born. It can be hard not to be bitter/jealous, they are simply human emotions. You don't want to miss out on an Eton education when you see others getting in.

They were always my views, but I suppose when you get a bit older you realise it doesn't really matter anymore. You move on from negative thoughts. You start attending the same institutions as the people you once thought of as 'smarmy posh boys'. At my UK university include a kid who's Dad is the top man at a Big Four accountancy firm, a kid whose Dad is in the Cabinet, a kid from an Aristocratic Family, a kid who's dad is the head of the army and foreign students who have Dads in EU governments. You realise most of them are pretty normal people. And if not, you've got to the same institution as them, so who cares!

My opposition has weakened. The only opinion I maintain is that a few of the private boys, you still sense even by the end of first year that they haven't lost that sense of status they have. The people that want to do Law because it's prestigious and they can start with a Tom Ford suit rolling out of Slaughter & May with a 60k salary rather than because they enjoy it. They don't understand that they will arrive at these companies and will be asked to make tea and do some photocopying for a man who went to a state school and a 'mid card' uni, and that's the key point. Largely when you get to work your school is irrelevant, and after you get the job, the same with the uni.

You meet people who said State School ruined there life, and that they were bullied to hell, so there parents moved them to Private School. It becomes difficult to justify a belief that denies them that way out. Equally it's hard to know that for others, that option just isn't available.

A stream of consciousness there. Just judge people on how they are today really. I can't say I wouldn't consider sending my kids to private if I could afford it in the future, so I probably wouldn't criticise private schools from now on.
I would think a private school could have been better for you. From what I have heard, they have far less tolerance for bullying behaviour. An interesting insight, nonetheless.

(Original post by genuinelydense)
the worst ones are like something from made in chelsea and the decent/nice ones are like something from mary poppins. theyre taught to be easy-going but deep down tend to harbour feelings of superiority; they have the same aura as very good-looking people
Oh, now that you talk of their aura, I definitely notice it, although in a good way that in general they're extremely comfortable talking to others, rarely feel defensive or threatened and are quite self-assured.

(Original post by anonymouspie227)
I cant speak for all but my cousins and siblings are nice people. Although they can be a bit snobby.
Yeah, from what I've gathered, the vast majority are nice, but there may be some snobbery, whether intentional or not.
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AspiringMedic8
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#68
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(Original post by Pride)
'I know this thread has been done to death, but still...'

just playin with ya OP
If you notice, most other threads are "What are state schools like versus private schools?" whereas mines focusses on solely the people, rather than the teaching or facilities.

(Original post by The Owl of Minerva)
Is the dichotomy between state and private school people and how they behave always so clear? Aren't their overlaps like posh people in state schools and not very posh people in private schools?
I would agree, to a certain extent. It's not clear.

(Original post by scrotgrot)
From a state grammar school, I've found the complete opposite at uni (Russell Group), they are much more socially conservative and much less likeable, particularly those points.
The fact that anyone is socially conservative or socially progressive doesn't make me like or dislike them, that's their personal views!

(Original post by Grozdova.)
To be honest, I don't think there's a huge difference to be honest. I go to a normal private school and whilst some of us are a bit naïve and sheltered, there are hardly any posh pupils. I think there's a bit of a misconception with regards to private schools and posh people - most people are just normal there!
Yeah, I'd agree that there's not many posh people as such when you're not in England, there's not the same clear differences in accent, for example.
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Eboracum
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(Original post by AspiringMedic8)
I would think a private school could have been better for you. From what I have heard, they have far less tolerance for bullying behaviour. An interesting insight, nonetheless.
Thank you for reading my post and taking the time to comment. Yes, state school was really difficult for me, it nearly ruined my life and took a lot of coming back from, so sometimes I do struggle not to be jealous of others that attended these institutions. Nonetheless, I wouldn't close them and would consider sending my children to one in the future.
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AspiringMedic8
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(Original post by Eboracum)
Thank you for reading my post and taking the time to comment. Yes, state school was really difficult for me, it nearly ruined my life and took a lot of coming back from, so sometimes I do struggle not to be jealous of others that attended these institutions. Nonetheless, I wouldn't close them and would consider sending my children to one in the future.
Me too. I believe the solution is for state schools not to tolerate badly behaved pupils, bullies or those who cause low level disruption. A school is as good as the pupils who attend it, hence why nearly all selective schools are far ahead of comprehensives. I don't even believe in selecting strictly on ability, but on good manners, behaviour, the ability to follow rules, etc, along with general effort and academic performance, of course!


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brownbearxo
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(Original post by AspiringMedic8)
I know there has been a thread on private schools versus state schools, but I was wondering if anyone, who has preferably been to both, could tell me if there are any differences in what the people are like, their friendlinesses, personalities, attitudes and any snobbery (if applicable). Did you feel welcome when you arrived? Was bullying more/ less common?

I'm just interested to find out as I know there are a lot of misconceptions in this area.

Thanks
I went to both.

Everyone was lovely at both. Bullying happens literally everywhere but at the private school it was a lot more developed lol, think war of words rather than an actual fist fight. I was less welcome at the private school but that may be because it was a boarding school and I joined late, meaning all the cliques had been formed. Made loads of friends eventually though. You get snobs everywhere too, and at the private school people were a lot more aware of their parents finances and stuff so no one would ever look down on someone who didn't have the latest shoes or something, because we all knew how much our parents were paying for us to be there.
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Jarred
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The guy on my street who went to private school always used to call a "bin" a "waste paper basket".

They live in a completely different world!
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Old_Simon
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I went to a very good independent (public) boarding school. The nouveaus were the real chavs. Everybody else was very hard working and pretty normal. We played sport every day even in the sixth form. Smoked and drank as much as we could. But the ethos was one of unrelenting hard academic work seven days a week.
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alexwilliams1996
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I have been to private school since I was 4. Trust me it isn't an Eton type, most of the girls (it's single sex) are normal people with parents that work hard to put them there but obviously there is the occasional snobby one but we just put them in their place! We are really not as bad as we are made out to be haha


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contradicta
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Been to state school my whole life, met some private school kids at french camp last year, one was a total **** (much like the stereotypes described on here) the other two I actually hung out with were really nice people and we still keep in touch! So from that I would say there is a huge variety of people attending these schools and the school doesn't always define the personality.
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POWCATTY
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i only met people from private schools when i came to uni. tbh theres not much of a difference, but the few i know arent really that clued up about money issues. yeah they know that some people dont have a lot of money, but they dont really understand the implications of that. ie my friends enjoy frequently going out for afternoon tea, which, at seven quid a pop is not something that i can afford! yet theyve not made an effort to change and do something more affordable, so ive just had to stop going also they arent very good at shopping on a budget, which is actually sometimes funny as my housemate bought 13 dishwasher tablets for £6, when i had got 24 for £3 (we have a house shoppin list but accidentally chose the same thing lol). they also have no idea what sort of a person a chav is, and just use it for anyone who looks a bit 'dodgy' to them! so yeah, id say from my limited experience, they are a bit naive about some things, but as long as they recognise that its not a problem! (but i bet they say the same thing about state-school people!)
it does become a problem with things like heating and housing budgets though. my housemate (same one) as obviously never had to worry about heating bills, and so has an electric fan on constantly in is room, and using up a hell of a lot of electricity. i havent gathered enough courage to tell him to turn it off, as its my fault he got it in the first place!! i told him not to put the heating on for like 4 hours when its only october, so that was his response. i guess he tried, bless him!
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Old_Simon
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(Original post by POWCATTY)
i only met people from private schools when i came to uni. tbh theres not much of a difference, but the few i know arent really that clued up about money issues. yeah they know that some people dont have a lot of money, but they dont really understand the implications of that. ie my friends enjoy frequently going out for afternoon tea, which, at seven quid a pop is not something that i can afford! yet theyve not made an effort to change and do something more affordable, so ive just had to stop going also they arent very good at shopping on a budget, which is actually sometimes funny as my housemate bought 13 dishwasher tablets for £6, when i had got 24 for £3 (we have a house shoppin list but accidentally chose the same thing lol). they also have no idea what sort of a person a chav is, and just use it for anyone who looks a bit 'dodgy' to them! so yeah, id say from my limited experience, they are a bit naive about some things, but as long as they recognise that its not a problem! (but i bet they say the same thing about state-school people!)
it does become a problem with things like heating and housing budgets though. my housemate (same one) as obviously never had to worry about heating bills, and so has an electric fan on constantly in is room, and using up a hell of a lot of electricity. i havent gathered enough courage to tell him to turn it off, as its my fault he got it in the first place!! i told him not to put the heating on for like 4 hours when its only october, so that was his response. i guess he tried, bless him!
Did you pass GCSE English before inviting the tax payer to fund your degree ?
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POWCATTY
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(Original post by Old_Simon)
Did you pass GCSE English before inviting the tax payer to fund your degree ?
i did!!! haha im as surprised as you are but it turns out im dyslexic, which is really not something im pleased about, but at least now i understand theres a reason why i never understood english!!
i paid taxes for a few years, so i sort of partially funded my degree (sort of), but with the nine grand tuition fees, i doubt theres much left for the tax payer to squabble over! also the fact that getting a degree is completely my choice, despite the fact that im going to finish it with £75000 of debt (at least!), and completely none of your concern. are you one of those people who resent paying taxes for healthcare, when you rarely use it so all your 'hard-earned' cash gets sent to those money-grabbing chronically ill people, or having to 'pay for school twice,' once for private school and then for state schools???
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Old_Simon
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(Original post by POWCATTY)
i did!!! haha im as surprised as you are but it turns out im dyslexic, which is really not something im pleased about, but at least now i understand theres a reason why i never understood english!!
i paid taxes for a few years, so i sort of partially funded my degree (sort of), but with the nine grand tuition fees, i doubt theres much left for the tax payer to squabble over! also the fact that getting a degree is completely my choice, despite the fact that im going to finish it with £75000 of debt (at least!), and completely none of your concern. are you one of those people who resent paying taxes for healthcare, when you rarely use it so all your 'hard-earned' cash gets sent to those money-grabbing chronically ill people, or having to 'pay for school twice,' once for private school and then for state schools???
Aaaaaaaaaaaahhhh. Dyslexic. OK.
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POWCATTY
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(Original post by Old_Simon)
Aaaaaaaaaaaahhhh. Dyslexic. OK.
hahahaha! ok so your just one of those people who has no real argument or contribution and so decides to attack your opponents by being gramatically superior and atempting to put them down! nice. tactics of the old 'school yard bully' aka a coward
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