I think I've made a terrible mistake .. (History)

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SilverAlex
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In my ignorance I applied to do History and have so far got offers from multiple universities even when my parents tried to convince me not to do it, my reasoning was that I love it and would like career relating to it. I've come to realise the History is one of the most worthless degrees in this industry and I would have been far better off studying Accounting like my father or Computer Science.
Is it too late to change my degree choice? Am I to be forever unemployed or working as a poorly paid teacher? Is History not as bad as it seems?
I'm panicking.
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Changing Skies
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(Original post by SilverAlex)
In my ignorance I applied to do History and have so far got offers from multiple universities even when my parents tried to convince me not to do it, my reasoning was that I love it and would like career relating to it. I've come to realise the History is one of the most worthless degrees in this industry and I would have been far better off studying Accounting like my father or Computer Science.
Is it too late to change my degree choice? Am I to be forever unemployed or working as a poorly paid teacher? Is History not as bad as it seems?
I'm panicking.
History is certainly not worthless! Whilst it doesn't have an obvious career path, it is a very respected degree! Though others on here would argue otherwise, it's so important to study something you love and that interests you, so history seems like a good choice. Don't let people on here brainwash you into believing your degree choice is worthless, because sadly many are ignorant and critical enough to do so
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SilverAlex
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It's late and I'm been reading some horror stories of people with History degrees having to work in lower paid jobs. I'm from an affluent family and I feel that if I don't end up earning a good amount I've let them down. It's frustrating, I feel that doing a more focused degree would really boost my chances at grabbing a good job however I'm in love with History and that's what I enjoy.
Argh, I'm just venting.
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blue_teacup
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In your ignorance? I think it would be ignorant to make such a drastic change from a history degree to a computer science or accounting degree. You're going to spend the next three years of your life studying a subject which you have to be absolutely dedicated to. Would it not be wise to choose something you enjoy? And it's certainly not true that a history degree will lead you to be poor and unemployed. History graduates I know have gone on to convert to law degrees, work in the department of international development, banking and in a whole array of professions. History provides an open pathway to so many jobs and is only a worthless degree if you don't make it worth its while. Don't let anyone else tell you what you want to do, only you know that.
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Bored_at_1AM
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(Original post by SilverAlex)
In my ignorance I applied to do History and have so far got offers from multiple universities even when my parents tried to convince me not to do it, my reasoning was that I love it and would like career relating to it. I've come to realise the History is one of the most worthless degrees in this industry and I would have been far better off studying Accounting like my father or Computer Science.
Is it too late to change my degree choice? Am I to be forever unemployed or working as a poorly paid teacher? Is History not as bad as it seems?
I'm panicking.
It isn't useless: most top graduate jobs require you to have studied a degree and take anyone regardless of what they did at university. I'm a Management Consultant at a top firm and people have a very wide range of degrees.

Having said that I would advise you to take a gap year and think about what you want to do, perhaps do some decent work experience, and then apply for what you feel is best. Make an informed decision.

In addition: you really can't go wrong with a decent degree in computer science/ accounting. I studied economics and one of the best things about it is that I used maths all through university, so when it came to doing tests for firms I passed pretty much all of them first time with no preparation. Had I done a history degree things would have been different, but ultimately I would have passed, doing a mathsy degree just saved me loads of time.
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SilverAlex
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(Original post by blue_teacup)
In your ignorance? I think it would be ignorant to make such a drastic change from a history degree to a computer science or accounting degree. You're going to spend the next three years of your life studying a subject which you have to be absolutely dedicated to. Would it not be wise to choose something you enjoy? And it's certainly not true that a history degree will lead you to be poor and unemployed. History graduates I know have gone on to convert to law degrees, work in the department of international development, banking and in a whole array of professions. History provides an open pathway to so many jobs and is only a worthless degree if you don't make it worth its while. Don't let anyone else tell you what you want to do, only you know that.
Thanks, I actually feel a lot more secure and confident in my decision after reading your reply. I'll see how things go.
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Splenge007
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what unis have you got offers from?

It's not just about the course you're doing but the uni you do it at, and the extra stuff you do: summer internships, volunteering, getting involved with societies, sports etc. That all helps to improve your skills and help you acquire more skills that will make you look good to employers. the course itself doesnt directly dictate your employment chances, but how you utilise the things you learn in the course.

Personally, i think you should go for it if you really enjoy the subject. And make sure you do other stuff!
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officelinebacker
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(Original post by SilverAlex)
It's late and I'm been reading some horror stories of people with History degrees having to work in lower paid jobs. I'm from an affluent family and I feel that if I don't end up earning a good amount I've let them down. It's frustrating, I feel that doing a more focused degree would really boost my chances at grabbing a good job however I'm in love with History and that's what I enjoy.
Argh, I'm just venting.
If you look you'll find horror stories about graduates failing to find jobs from all degrees. I personally know two graduates who finished Uni 2 years ago and still haven't found a good job yet, one of them achieved a 2:2 in Law and one had a 2:2 in Accounting (or something like that), so both in "respected" subjects.

You see what the common factor is? They both got a 2:2.

History is viewed as an easy degree by a lot of students, because it's one of those subjects that's easy to look down on, lots of easy jokes to be made, and a course that at a lot of Universities does seem to have a large number of "less academic" students doing it.

If you go to Uni to do history and just doss your way through it, come out with a 3:3 or a 3rd, then of course you're going to struggle to find a job as a result.

However, if you achieve a 1st, while your degree still won't have the prestige of a lot of "more worthwhile" subjects, it still shows that you're an intelligent person who has worked very hard to achieve that result, and you should do fine when it comes to getting a job afterwards.

If you love History then it's what you should study. If you went to do a subject like accountancy or computer science, something which I'm assuming you're nowhere near as passionate about, then you're going to have far less motivation to work and so a greater chance of not achieving the kind of marks you would on a history degree, and end up graduating with a worse result.

Stick to your initial conviction, go to University, enjoy it, work hard, and make damn sure you come out of the other side with a 1st and you'll do just fine afterwards.
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rosebud114
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You can do History and then change paths. For example you can do the History degree then do a conversion year studying law and become a lawyer.(that is just one example you could follow) You still have a lot of time so don't worry. Just do some research! you will get there.
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Origami Bullets
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(Original post by officelinebacker)
If you look you'll find horror stories about graduates failing to find jobs from all degrees. I personally know two graduates who finished Uni 2 years ago and still haven't found a good job yet, one of them achieved a 2:2 in Law and one had a 2:2 in Accounting (or something like that), so both in "respected" subjects.

You see what the common factor is? They both got a 2:2.

History is viewed as an easy degree by a lot of students, because it's one of those subjects that's easy to look down on, lots of easy jokes to be made, and a course that at a lot of Universities does seem to have a large number of "less academic" students doing it.

If you go to Uni to do history and just doss your way through it, come out with a 3:3 or a 3rd, then of course you're going to struggle to find a job as a result.

However, if you achieve a 1st, while your degree still won't have the prestige of a lot of "more worthwhile" subjects, it still shows that you're an intelligent person who has worked very hard to achieve that result, and you should do fine when it comes to getting a job afterwards.

If you love History then it's what you should study. If you went to do a subject like accountancy or computer science, something which I'm assuming you're nowhere near as passionate about, then you're going to have far less motivation to work and so a greater chance of not achieving the kind of marks you would on a history degree, and end up graduating with a worse result.

Stick to your initial conviction, go to University, enjoy it, work hard, and make damn sure you come out of the other side with a 1st and you'll do just fine afterwards.
I couldn't agree with this more (+repped)

Just to follow on from this - if you do a subject you love, then you'll be more motivated to do the work, so you'll get higher grades. In turn, those higher grades will make you more employable.

Around 70% of the graduate jobs on offer don't specify a particular degree subject (and most of those that do are things like medicine and engineeing, which you're not interested in anyway). However, there is a lot of auto-filtering that goes on. This means that anyone with a 2:2 or below will have their applications binned without a human ever reading it.

So, your career opportunities are substantially better with a 2:1 in history than a 2:2 in accounting or computer science.
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Shadow-X
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History keeps repeating it self.
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username851717
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As long as you have a degree that is a 2:1 or above you don't have to worry too much. The geezer going through the job application isn't going to stop midway and tear up your application because you did history over accounting (unless its primarily an accounting position) for a graduate entry level job.
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Origami Bullets
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(Original post by nixonsjellybeans)
As long as you have a degree that is a 2:1 or above you don't have to worry too much. The geezer going through the job application isn't going to stop midway and tear up your application because you did history over accounting (unless its primarily an accounting position) for a graduate entry level job.
In fairness, even for accounting graduate schemes, you don't need a degree in accounting. For instance, in terms of degrees KPMG just say that they want a 2:1, alongside 320 UCAS points from 3 A Levels (this latter requirement is essentially there to weed out those from bottom end unis) and B in GCSE English and Maths. http://www.kpmgcareers.co.uk/graduates/faqs#question718
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returnmigrant
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Do History.

History grads end up working in the biggest range of jobs you could possibly imagine.


Accountancy - how BORING is that? Three years studying spreadsheets - and nothing more interesting to ever look forward to in life? Life was supposed to be fun!
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aranexus
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(Original post by SilverAlex)
In my ignorance I applied to do History and have so far got offers from multiple universities even when my parents tried to convince me not to do it, my reasoning was that I love it and would like career relating to it. I've come to realise the History is one of the most worthless degrees in this industry and I would have been far better off studying Accounting like my father or Computer Science.
Is it too late to change my degree choice? Am I to be forever unemployed or working as a poorly paid teacher? Is History not as bad as it seems?
I'm panicking.
Probably the worst place to get advice about this since people will either just try not to hurt your feelings or give you misinformation that they've been sold. If i was you i'd do my best to change asap. Personally, I really like history, knowing about the wars and such, but there isn't much of an industry for it aside from teaching and a few other esoteric jobs. We live in a technological age where technology is only going to become more and more prevalent: this means that mathematics, sciences, electronics, and esp computer science, to name most of the major ones, are of paramount import.
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returnmigrant
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Here are examples of what History grads do, from two very different Unis

http://www.kent.ac.uk/careers/history.htm


http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/careers/...ng_your_degree

We don't all become 'teachers'.
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r_u_jelly
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No it's fine, better than english lit xD
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xDave-
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Well, I think differently to everyone else posting here. I do wish I had done something I liked, but I also wish I had done something that had employment prospects and was bearable. I'm doing linguistics, it's completely useless. I'm trying to get a first for the reasons a poster above said, and I probably will, but I still don't feel very confident about my prospects; maybe I will be able to get a job but I might not have the luxury of getting a bearable one. Uni should be about doing something you love, but unfortunately that's not what it is. As that is the situation, I'd advise you to think carefully before you go into your degree. Take a gap year if need be, try and get some work experience in areas you're considering. Remember, you're working for about 50 years, you need to prioritise getting that right. And that doesn't just mean good pay, it means job satisfaction on the whole. If you have that, then maybe you can do a history degree on the side when you're older.
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SlowlorisIncognito
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First of all, stop worrying so much about what your family think! You shouldn't spend the rest of your life doing things just to please them or live up to their expectations.

Lots of people have given you ideas of careers you can go into with a degree in history. Don't forget you also have options like a post grad law conversion, or doing accountancy exams later on, if you decide that's something you want to do.

At the moment, there is a shortage of graduate jobs, so you are always going to read some horror stories. At the moment, just having a degree of any sort is not enough to enable you to walk into a job. Graduate employers also want to see a wide range of work experience. Most of the recent graduates I know who are/have been unemployed lack work experience. It's not really much to do with the degree they get (although getting a poor degree classification doesn't help). Employers also want to employ people who have shown they are reliable and comitted in jobs, and have experience relevant to the field as this saves on training.

I actually read recently, that far from having guarenteed jobs, many computer science graduates struggle to find employment, as they do not have experience of working in industry.

I think that getting good (2.1/first) degree in history, plus some good, varied work experience will give you just as good a chance of landing a well paying job as anything else you can do. Many graduates don't work in fields directly relating to their degree.
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Table dust
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take a gap year out and decide

comp sci grads earn a lot more than history grads
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