How many cases should I know before going into an exam and to what depth?

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0zzy94
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Hey guys, my exam is in roughly 28 hours from now... so quick replies needed.

I've got an English Legal System exam (1st year). I've decided to put all my effort into the first half of the exam; things like statute interpretation, stare decisis and EU law and to a lesser extent the woolf reforms. I've totally neglected the criminal procedure and civil procedure (with the exception of the woolf reforms). I lacked time.

I have looked through my textbook, lecture hand outs and seminar sheets for the areas mentioned. I gathered a list of 25 cases. I do not know the 'ins and outs' of the cases, however I do know the general outline and why they'd be important in relevance to a specific point.

For example, for the House of Lords refusing to break precedent I've got London City Tramways v London County Council 1898 and DPP v Smith (1961), whilst for them overruling themselves I've got Miliangos v George Frank Ltd and Murphy v Brentwood DC. Now I do not know anything about all these cases other than why they're important, e.g in London City they refused to budge on precedent even if the result is injustice.

Is this enough depth? Like I know an important part of each case, so I can apply them.

Also, is 25-30 enough for 1 exam? Each point, as shown above, either has 1 case or 2 cases tops. For example, the literal rule has 2 cases whilst the purposive approach has 1 (Pepper v Hart).

Quick replies needed, cheers!
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cliffg
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(Original post by 0zzy94)
Hey guys, my exam is in roughly 28 hours from now... so quick replies needed.

I've got an English Legal System exam (1st year). I've decided to put all my effort into the first half of the exam; things like statute interpretation, stare decisis and EU law and to a lesser extent the woolf reforms. I've totally neglected the criminal procedure and civil procedure (with the exception of the woolf reforms). I lacked time.

I have looked through my textbook, lecture hand outs and seminar sheets for the areas mentioned. I gathered a list of 25 cases. I do not know the 'ins and outs' of the cases, however I do know the general outline and why they'd be important in relevance to a specific point.

For example, for the House of Lords refusing to break precedent I've got London City Tramways v London County Council 1898 and DPP v Smith (1961), whilst for them overruling themselves I've got Miliangos v George Frank Ltd and Murphy v Brentwood DC. Now I do not know anything about all these cases other than why they're important, e.g in London City they refused to budge on precedent even if the result is injustice.

Is this enough depth? Like I know an important part of each case, so I can apply them.

Also, is 25-30 enough for 1 exam? Each point, as shown above, either has 1 case or 2 cases tops. For example, the literal rule has 2 cases whilst the purposive approach has 1 (Pepper v Hart).

Quick replies needed, cheers!
Don't think of the exam as a competition to squeeze in as many cases as you can. Rather use the cases as authority for the points you are making. So, for example,one reason for the HoLs or Supreme Court departing from its own previous decisions may be to reflect changes in society, public policy or developments in the law since the prior decisions. One example is British Railways Board v Herrington where the Lords departed from a series of 19th and earlier 20th century cases regarding children trespassing on railways. By 1972 when Herrington was decided the law of negligence had developed as had public policy in relation to a duty of care owed to trespassing children. The HoLs, therefore, felt able to ignore the old decisions and in effect bring the law up to date with modern society.

Try and have one case as authority for each point you want to make.
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