Please help university prestige vs course for job prospects? Watch

bshrestha
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
Okay so basically I have applied to do philosophy and economics at UCL/LSE. But, now I am thinking that maybe a straight economics degree at a lower university but still a Russell group university would be better. I mean in order to reapply for an economics degree I'd have to take a gap year. But, its just because everyone tells me there is very little I can do with a philosophy degree even if its at LSE / UCL in terms of jobs and I really want a high paying job in the city. Also, since I want to do my masters in financial economics at cambridge/oxford, they require a lot of economics and maths modules which philosophy and economics does not offer. What do you guys think please give me some advice?
0
reply
benq
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 years ago
#2
(Original post by bshrestha)
Okay so basically I have applied to do philosophy and economics at UCL/LSE. But, now I am thinking that maybe a straight economics degree at a lower university but still a Russell group university would be better. I mean in order to reapply for an economics degree I'd have to take a gap year. But, its just because everyone tells me there is very little I can do with a philosophy degree even if its at LSE / UCL in terms of jobs and I really want a high paying job in the city. Also, since I want to do my masters in financial economics at cambridge/oxford, they require a lot of economics and maths modules which philosophy and economics does not offer. What do you guys think please give me some advice?

Did you get offers from LSE/UCL?
0
reply
bshrestha
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#3
(Original post by benq)
Did you get offers from LSE/UCL?
No. But, I'm saying if I were to get an offer... what would you advice?
0
reply
Dominic101
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#4
Report 5 years ago
#4
(Original post by bshrestha)
Okay so basically I have applied to do philosophy and economics at UCL/LSE. But, now I am thinking that maybe a straight economics degree at a lower university but still a Russell group university would be better. I mean in order to reapply for an economics degree I'd have to take a gap year. But, its just because everyone tells me there is very little I can do with a philosophy degree even if its at LSE / UCL in terms of jobs and I really want a high paying job in the city. Also, since I want to do my masters in financial economics at cambridge/oxford, they require a lot of economics and maths modules which philosophy and economics does not offer. What do you guys think please give me some advice?
Well who ever told you this knows nothing at all. Just stick with the philosophy and economics your job prospects will basically be the same as those doing straight economics.
0
reply
bshrestha
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#5
(Original post by Dominic101)
Well who ever told you this knows nothing at all. Just stick with the philosophy and economics your job prospects will basically be the same as those doing straight economics.
Please could you elaborate on that. I am really confused cause my friends at school laugh at me when I tell them I'm doing philosophy and tell me that it is not a real subject...
0
reply
benq
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#6
Report 5 years ago
#6
(Original post by bshrestha)
No. But, I'm saying if I were to get an offer... what would you advice?
If you get into LSE - go to LSE. The same with UCL, though to a lesser extent. Besides, you won't even use the undergraduate level economics while working in IB, so I wouldn't worry too much about the balance between Economics and Philosophy. What matters is the university brand and if you have LSE on your resume, it doesn't matter what subject(s) you are doing, your interview/test performance combined with your experience/CV quality will get you the job, not the name of your degree. Good luck.

P.S If you are set on Economics MSc then yeah, you are better off with straight Econ/Econ+Maths.
0
reply
Dominic101
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#7
Report 5 years ago
#7
(Original post by bshrestha)
Please could you elaborate on that. I am really confused cause my friends at school laugh at me when I tell them I'm doing philosophy and tell me that it is not a real subject...
I used to do that same thing but now I am actually jealous of those who do philosophy as it seems like such an interesting subject. It is a proper subject and also for jobs inb anks which I'm guessing might be your plan the subject matters less than where you got your degree from and LSE/UCl are target unis
0
reply
bshrestha
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#8
(Original post by benq)
If you get into LSE - go to LSE. The same with UCL, though to a lesser extent. Besides, you won't even use the undergraduate level economics while working in IB, so I wouldn't worry too much about the balance between Economics and Philosophy. What matters is the university brand and if you have LSE on your resume, it doesn't matter what subject(s) you are doing, your interview/test performance combined with your experience/CV quality will get you the job, not the name of your degree. Good luck.

P.S If you are set on Economics MSc then yeah, you are better off with straight Econ/Econ+Maths.
I mean I know that doing economics and going to LSE would put me at a very good position, but its just that philosophy really limits it and prevents me from applying to many of the oxbridge graduate courses that a straight economic degree with enable. The only masters I could really do is in management at oxbridge and I am also scared that my degree in philosophy and economics won't get me into investment banking.
0
reply
benq
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#9
Report 5 years ago
#9
(Original post by bshrestha)
I mean I know that doing economics and going to LSE would put me at a very good position, but its just that philosophy really limits it and prevents me from applying to many of the oxbridge graduate courses that a straight economic degree with enable. The only masters I could really do is in management at oxbridge and I am also scared that my degree in philosophy and economics won't get me into investment banking.
So following your logic PPE from Oxford also wouldn't allow you to work in investment banking because of philosophy and politics component? As I mentioned earlier, in investment banking you actually won't be applying any advanced economics...It doesn't matter what you study. It just happens that economists are more aware of what finance is about and hence are more prepared for the interviews. Apart from that you can do any degree whatsoever and still stand a great chance of getting into IB. On the other hand if you want to do MSc/PhD Economics then, as I also mentioned earlier, go for more mathematical BSc.
0
reply
FadedJade
  • CV Helper
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#10
Report 5 years ago
#10
Were any of the people who told you that actually philosophy students?
I graduated from my undergrad in 2009. Of the ones I know where they went, lots are still in academia, most go into Law (this is the most common area for philosophy grads to work in), and many others work in business/corporate environments.

Either way, it isn't like you are not doing any economics at all, and while I don't know how the London courses work, presumably in later years you get to choose some modules and can focus on economics.
0
reply
WhamBamJam.
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#11
Report 5 years ago
#11
(Original post by bshrestha)
Please could you elaborate on that. I am really confused cause my friends at school laugh at me when I tell them I'm doing philosophy and tell me that it is not a real subject...
Do they back this up with any evidence? Don't listen to hearsay.
0
reply
polscistudent88
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#12
Report 5 years ago
#12
Do you have the possibility to concentrate on the economics side after the first year? Could you do straight economics at Masters level with a BA/BSc in Philosophy and Economics? If you can...
0
reply
Sigma44
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#13
Report 5 years ago
#13
(Original post by bshrestha)
Okay so basically I have applied to do philosophy and economics at UCL/LSE. But, now I am thinking that maybe a straight economics degree at a lower university but still a Russell group university would be better. I mean in order to reapply for an economics degree I'd have to take a gap year. But, its just because everyone tells me there is very little I can do with a philosophy degree even if its at LSE / UCL in terms of jobs and I really want a high paying job in the city. Also, since I want to do my masters in financial economics at cambridge/oxford, they require a lot of economics and maths modules which philosophy and economics does not offer. What do you guys think please give me some advice?
Prestige > Course.

Philosophy & economics at LSE is good enough to get you a high paying job (ie. top tier investment bank/management consultancy). However, depending on how much lower the other russell group university is, it might not be the case.

EDIT (to the buy below): University prestige is not a 17 year old concept. If you work in a good company, you'll realize both that and work experience is equally important in getting a job.
0
reply
returnmigrant
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#14
Report 5 years ago
#14
A few thinks to think about


a) employers are not as obsessed about League Table and nebulous concepts like 'prestige' as 17 year olds are. They do not sift job applications depending on which Uni or precise course you did. They are far more interested in your final degree result and what else you did at Uni (see below).

b) what employers want is experience not endless bit of paper. Your job prospects will be heavily influence by what else is on your CV - placements, internships, relevant vacation work, relevant voluntary work etc etc.

c) It is pretty pointless doing a Masters straight after your under-grad degree. You have no functional experience of economics on which to base your advanced study. Get a job, get a few years of experience on your CV, then think about the need for a Masters degree. You may see 'postgrad qualification' on a job spec. That doesnt mean they want a fresh young graduate with no experience. They want someone with greater maturity and a grasp of the reality of the more complex aspects of economics.
0
reply
MagicNMedicine
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#15
Report 5 years ago
#15
Do you really want to do philosophy or did you apply to that joint honours one thinking it would be less competitive so you could get to a bigger name university?

If you want to do finance or economics based masters at Oxbridge you will need to do a lot of maths and have a lot of money to afford the fees.
0
reply
SlowlorisIncognito
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#16
Report 5 years ago
#16
Basically what returnmigrant said.

The two factors that will most determine your employability after university are the grade of your degree (many employers filter out applicants with less than a 2.1) and you previous work experience. If you think that you can get a good grade in philosphy and economics then take it. As you will be living in London, you will have plenty of oppourtunities to gain experience alongside your degree.

I would also add that in three years time you may change your mind about wanting to do further study straight away. An undergraduate degree is a lot of work, and many people find they want a break before going on to a masters.
1
reply
nicatre
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#17
Report 5 years ago
#17
I would pick a course based on your enjoyment of the curriculum and your comfort in the local area.
0
reply
Classical Liberal
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#18
Report 5 years ago
#18
If you do want to do an economics masters at somewhere like Oxford, then you are going to need to do an economics degree with an emphasis on econometrics.

To get a job in investment banking though, you don't need to have done things like that. Just go to a target university, such as UCL, LSE, get top grades (this definitely includes getting top marks at a-level) and make a good application to them (get in there early with spring weeks). Whether you do economics and philosophy or straight economics doesn't matter much.
0
reply
Jkizer
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#19
Report 5 years ago
#19
Happy people have more motivation. Motivation brings more determination and hard work which leads to a great degree.

Never assume going to anywhere will guarantee you a high flying job. (Plus if you want an Oxford master, your probably want the highest degree you can)


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Would you turn to a teacher if you were being bullied?

Yes (31)
25.41%
No (91)
74.59%

Watched Threads

View All