African Aid Vs Trade

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McRite
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#1
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#1
It is the age old question. Should donors increase foreign aid, or encourage trade with their recipient countries in Africa.

I believe the West has generalized the need for foreign aid in Africa, saying it would eradicate poverty in Africa. However in the last 50 years, more than $500 Billion has been received in Africa as aid, yet we're still seeing a lot of poverty. Aid has led to mismanagement and increased corruption in the recipient nations, and has led to dependency of foreign aid. It has also led to Africans leaders taking orders from donors instead of their own people.

I don't think aid creates wealth instead, a dependency and large overhanging debt on Africa.

Please express your opinions, I want to know your views on it as the UK is the second largest donor in the world.
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Retro Soul
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#2
Report 8 years ago
#2
Aid does create dependency.
I blame many of the corrupt leaders in parts of Africa.
Every day a starving child,woman is featured in yet another advert.
Pure West propaganda since in many Western-Westernized areas there are too great levels of poverty.
In some parts of Russia and here on the UK,mass poverty,deprivation,people living like literal animals,however we will not see such adverts showcasing non Brown skin as the theme HAS to continue,which being,Africans can not look after themselves and always have hands out.

Though "yes" aid does I think over a long period of time create dependency,I think the West should have no involvement with Africa on any level and you would see certain changes.

The Western establishment are perfectly okay with the amount of aid going to Africa that is for many reasons,one or two of them not for altruistic reasons.
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McRite
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#3
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#3
(Original post by Retro Soul)
Aid does create dependency.
I blame many of the corrupt leaders in parts of Africa.
Every day a starving child,woman is featured in yet another advert.
Pure West propaganda since in many Western-Westernized areas there are too great levels of poverty.
In some parts of Russia and here on the UK,mass poverty,deprivation,people living like literal animals,however we will not see such adverts showcasing non Brown skin as the theme HAS to continue,which being,Africans can not look after themselves and always have hands out.
I agree, the western media show Africa as if everyone is dying from famine or Aids, to promote aid, which is going to the pockets of corrupt officials.

Western poverty is something that is not advertised and I find it alarming they would be willing to give millions of dollars to foreigners instead of assisting their own poor.

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Monkey.Man
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#4
Report 8 years ago
#4
trade - charities should be the alternative, not forcing citizens of this country through taxation to pay for people in other countries, which potentially, ends up going to the wrong people (e.g. the rich people in those countries). our country isn't at service to another country, in the same sense an individual person is not at service to another person
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bramley
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#5
Report 8 years ago
#5
I'm for trade. I'm reading a book about African politics at the moment and it seems that aid often precipitates problems, though this is only one opinion.

I think aid can be ok given that it is for grass roots up projects, but in many cases it creates dependency which isn't an ideal situation really.
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Rakas21
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#6
Report 8 years ago
#6
(Original post by McRite)
It is the age old question. Should donors increase foreign aid, or encourage trade with their recipient countries in Africa.

I believe the West has generalized the need for foreign aid in Africa, saying it would eradicate poverty in Africa. However in the last 50 years, more than $500 Billion has been received in Africa as aid, yet we're still seeing a lot of poverty. Aid has led to mismanagement and increased corruption in the recipient nations, and has led to dependency of foreign aid. It has also led to Africans leaders taking orders from donors instead of their own people.

I don't think aid creates wealth instead, a dependency and large overhanging debt on Africa.

Please express your opinions, I want to know your views on it as the UK is the second largest donor in the world.
Trade is my preference.

While most people are now wrong to think it goes to corrupt governments (85% of it now does not) i don't like our aid system which gives small amounts to around 90 countries. I would personally prefer a reduction in foreign aid to £2bn with £1bn being divided between the 10 most deprived countries and another £1bn being divided between the ten most popular charities that Brits gave to themselves (i.e. let the people decide).

When it comes to Africa i also think one should pick their priorities. Aid would be far better spent on helping future large economies like Tanazania, Nigeria or the Congo as opposed to some small sub-Saharan country.
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russellsteapot
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#7
Report 8 years ago
#7
While I don't like the aid system, how does one go about 'encouraging trade'? And trade of what? Controlled by who?

Those who have things to trade already do so. All over the world. There are thousands of successful international companies in Africa. I'm not sure if any African nation has an issue with trade; even the ****ed up ones like Somalia have reasonably competitive export economies. All 'we' could really do is enter into free trade agreements, which doesn't do much more than help the handful of people who own the companies.

I wonder if 'we' try too hard with spreading the western joy, and would be better off retreating from places rather than pushing ourselves into them. What problems do exist in some African countries aren't going to be solved by aid, nor will they be solved by 'trade' (whatever that means). They're problems which need to be sorted out internally, by the countries themselves. I'm not saying stop charity, stop vaccination programmes and whatnot, but maybe instead of being benevolent parents smiling over little Africa and bestowing whatever kindness we see fit, we could try being friends instead.
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McRite
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#8
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#8
(Original post by russellsteapot)
While I don't like the aid system, how does one go about 'encouraging trade'? And trade of what? Controlled by who?

Those who have things to trade already do so. All over the world. There are thousands of successful international companies in Africa. I'm not sure if any African nation has an issue with trade; even the ****ed up ones like Somalia have reasonably competitive export economies. All 'we' could really do is enter into free trade agreements, which doesn't do much more than help the handful of people who own the companies.

I wonder if 'we' try too hard with spreading the western joy, and would be better off retreating from places rather than pushing ourselves into them. What problems do exist in some African countries aren't going to be solved by aid, nor will they be solved by 'trade' (whatever that means). They're problems which need to be sorted out internally, by the countries themselves. I'm not saying stop charity, stop vaccination programmes and whatnot, but maybe instead of being benevolent parents smiling over little Africa and bestowing whatever kindness we see fit, we could try being friends instead.
In terms of trade the problem at the moment is that most of the profits from exports of Africa go to the import countries (especially the West) which is the problem, slows down the creation of wealth. I think there should be encouragement to develop the infrastructure to develop the raw materials we produce in order to export high value goods and increase jobs, wealth and improve the economies.

I do think we can't just stop all aid but it be prioritised.

With much better trade agreements and less trade barriers. I believe we can take a step further in development.

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Sir Fox
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#9
Report 7 years ago
#9
(Original post by McRite)
I do think we can't just stop all aid but it be prioritised.
It's not a matter of 'either or', the answer is 'both'. Aid can be effective if done well, but naturally the ultimate aim is self dependence through strong economies and a similar standard of life.

With much better trade agreements and less trade barriers. I believe we can take a step further in development.
The key is education. In order to reach competitiveness the state of schooling in many African nations needs to dramatically increase. I do not have any personal experience with higher education (there seem to be some good institutions like the University of Botswana), but I guess it's similar. The whole system needs to be changed.

Then, as you have already pointed out, raw materials should be processed in the country in order to increase the profit - naturally, it would also create more jobs.

And then there is the political level. In the last couple of years there has been the notion of Africa booming and being the market of the future, and it being still unfairly portrayed as a war-torn continent. I think this notion is only half true.

Looking at Sub-Saharan Africa right now, there are major conflicts and civil wars in Mali, Somalia, CAR, DR Congo, Nigeria and South Sudan. Some are age old conflicts, others are pretty new (Mali and CAR), at least in their current form.
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McRite
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#10
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#10
(Original post by Sir Fox)
It's not a matter of 'either or', the answer is 'both'. Aid can be effective if done well, but naturally the ultimate aim is self dependence through strong economies and a similar standard of life.



The key is education. In order to reach competitiveness the state of schooling in many African nations needs to dramatically increase. I do not have any personal experience with higher education (there seem to be some good institutions like the University of Botswana), but I guess it's similar. The whole system needs to be changed.

Then, as you have already pointed out, raw materials should be processed in the country in order to increase the profit - naturally, it would also create more jobs.

And then there is the political level. In the last couple of years there has been the notion of Africa booming and being the market of the future, and it being still unfairly portrayed as a war-torn continent. I think this notion is only half true.

Looking at Sub-Saharan Africa right now, there are major conflicts and civil wars in Mali, Somalia, CAR, DR Congo, Nigeria and South Sudan. Some are age old conflicts, others are pretty new (Mali and CAR), at least in their current form.
I agree with what your saying however just improving education and not creating the conditions to facilitate the educated, there would be a so called 'brain drain' which is happening in most of Africa, there's not enough jobs for the well educated and are forced seek employment in MEDC's or South Africa.

Well I do agree with what your saying about how the image of Africa is slowly changing. Only 6 countries are experiencing civil war even though there are 54 countries in Africa, I guess some are still suffering from chronic poverty, however we need to get over the idea of just pouring money in these troubled states, education could be the first step as you said.
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