Ghazal by Mimi Khalvati: The speaker.

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Emma_Etheredge
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I'm currently in the second year of an English (separate English language and literature courses) GCSE course. I am currently working my way through the Moon on the Tides anthology. The poem by Mimi Khalvati, Ghazal, has proved to be extremely enticing so far. The theme of unrequited love that runs throughout is often though of as something to which most (teenagers especially) can relate to. I'm now trying to work out who the speaker is: is is Khalvati herself, or is she writing in character? Any help would be much appreciated.
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Chlorophile
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(Original post by Emma_Etheredge)
I'm currently in the second year of an English (separate English language and literature courses) GCSE course. I am currently working my way through the Moon on the Tides anthology. The poem by Mimi Khalvati, Ghazal, has proved to be extremely enticing so far. The theme of unrequited love that runs throughout is often though of as something to which most (teenagers especially) can relate to. I'm now trying to work out who the speaker is: is is Khalvati herself, or is she writing in character? Any help would be much appreciated.
Personally, I think the poem is about the poet herself. She mentions that the object of the ghazal should be the "Shamsuddin to my Rumi", which is a direct reference to an ancient ghazal writer which would imply, in my view, that she is connecting the entire thing to herself. Most significantly, at the end of the poem she writes "I'll be twice the me". You could say that this is overanalysing the poem, but you could see it like this. Twice the me = Me Me = Mimi, which is of course the poet's name.

There's an absolutely outstanding analysis here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ht0blddbOvI
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Emma_Etheredge
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(Original post by Chlorophile)
Personally, I think the poem is about the poet herself. She mentions that the object of the ghazal should be the "Shamsuddin to my Rumi", which is a direct reference to an ancient ghazal writer which would imply, in my view, that she is connecting the entire thing to herself. Most significantly, at the end of the poem she writes "I'll be twice the me". You could say that this is overanalysing the poem, but you could see it like this. Twice the me = Me Me = Mimi, which is of course the poet's name.

There's an absolutely outstanding analysis here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ht0blddbOvI
Thank you so much,a second opinion definitely assured my own! I had actually already watched and made notes on the video, which is indeed very helpful I had considered the significance of references towards her name, although wondered whether it was in there simply because of the typical format of a ghazal having the poet's signature in the final stanza.
Thanks again for the reply
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Chlorophile
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(Original post by Emma_Etheredge)
Thank you so much,a second opinion definitely assured my own! I had actually already watched and made notes on the video, which is indeed very helpful I had considered the significance of references towards her name, although wondered whether it was in there simply because of the typical format of a ghazal having the poet's signature in the final stanza.
Thanks again for the reply
What I would always do is give your own interpretation (i.e. that it is a personal poem), but then say "However, it could also be interpreted as..." and then give a quick alternate interpretation. It's things like these that get you the A*!
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