Who is you favourite Prime Minister since 1945-present day?

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Poll: Who is you favourite Prime Ministers since 1945-presant?
Attlee (38)
31.4%
Churchill (8)
6.61%
Eden (2)
1.65%
Alec D-H (2)
1.65%
Wilson (3)
2.48%
Heath (2)
1.65%
Callahan (1)
0.83%
Thather (33)
27.27%
Major (9)
7.44%
Blair (9)
7.44%
Brown (2)
1.65%
Cameron (8)
6.61%
NONE! (4)
3.31%
Will95206
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#1
Who is you favourite Prime Minister since 1945?

Sorry all for the mistake *Thatcher!

Dont forget its is a multiple option poll!

The race for the top is between Thatcher and Attlee!
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illegaltobepoor
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I would be for John Major. He was the kind of guy who would work with anyone. He may have stabbed Thatcher in the back but that fact is she wasn't that popular up North and Major knew this. Some people say he was boring. Well holding down a job is boring and being fair to people is boring. I just think he should of stood his corner a bit better.
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Solivagant
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#3
Our great Madge.
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meenu89
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(Original post by Will95206)
Who is you favourite Prime Minister since 1945?

You spelt her name wrong Be interesting to see how many votes for there will be for 'Brown'.
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L i b
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Hmm, I'm an admirer of Maggie in many ways, but she also had a lot of shortcomings. Unflinching determination is inspiring, but it doesn't necessarily mean you do the best you can do.

I think I'd have to say Major, followed by Blair. This all sounds a bit modern, so I should point out that I'm quite an admirer of Ted Heath, and believe Anthony Eden is ludicrously underrated due to Suez - and I'd have made most of the decisions he did without benefit of hindsight. A special mention to Harold Wilson, despite being a bit of a *******, for overseeing a lot of the social reforms which fundamentally changed this country into broadly the shape we see it today.

I also suspect my affection for Major is partly due to him being in office when I first became aware of such a thing as Prime Ministers, and him setting an archetype for my idea of PMs against which all were measured: grey hair, soberly dressed, an accent that could be from anywhere in the UK, calm, measured, unobtrusive.
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Ciranore
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Edward Heath!
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MagicNMedicine
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(Original post by illegaltobepoor)
I would be for John Major. He was the kind of guy who would work with anyone. He may have stabbed Thatcher in the back but that fact is she wasn't that popular up North and Major knew this. Some people say he was boring. Well holding down a job is boring and being fair to people is boring. I just think he should of stood his corner a bit better.
Major never stabbed Thatcher in the back.

It was Geoffrey Howe and Michael Hestletine who got her.

Howe resigned from Cabinet, and unlike the usual non contentious resignation speech that departing Ministers give, Howe gave a speech in the Commons that was a damning critique of the way she was running her government. It is one of the all time classic House of Commons moments, you can find it on youtube. Howe was the quiet man of politics and the model English gentleman who wouldn't rock the boat, and laying in to your own PM like that just doesnt happen, especially to an iconic figure like Thatcher. It emerged later in various autobiographies that Thatcher had been a bully to Howe for many years in Cabinet and he was always too mild mannered to speak out but this was payback.

Once Howe burned Thatcher in public like that, it was open season. Everyone was just waiting for Hestletine to declare his hand as a leadership challenge. Hestletine had fallen out with Thatcher 4 years before and quit Cabinet back then but he always kept silent and was just a lurking presence that everyone knew wanted the crown himself. After Howe had done his speech (which he finished by saying something like "the time has now come for others to perhaps consider their own response....", basically inviting Hestletine to come forward) Hestletine put in a leadership challenge.

Major came forward after being encouraged by others that he could win, because although Hestletine was a big name and very charismatic, he had a lot of enemies, and Major attracted the 'stop Hestletine' vote in the Tory party. Major was basically in the right place at the right time, he hadn't really considered being leader.

Major was a generally competent and well liked guy that had been talked of as a potential successor to Thatcher down the line but in Major's book he said he hadn't anticipated putting his hat in the ring: had Thatcher gone to the next election and lost he wouldn't have gone for it because he said being Leader of the Opposition never appealed to him, and probably by the time they got back in office the moment would have moved on. But when Thatcher was challenged by Hestletine, that was just a window of opportunity that would never come again.

As a PM Major was not perfect but I thought he did well in a difficult set of circumstances with a Tory party that at the time behaved disgracefully and undermined him. I think he was the last of his kind, an ordinary guy without 'connections' who got experience in real world before politics and got promoted through merit.

Nowadays sometimes you see him doing TV interviews about various topics, the economy, war, Europe etc and he is always well worth listening to. There's never any political point scoring, he always gives a balanced view and looks at both sides, and I think he talks a lot of sense. Also he's the only PM of my lifetime that didn't care about his ego and image, but I never agreed with the boring thing, he was always articulate, intelligent and came across as friendly and polite.
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Rakas21
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Thatcher, Major and Blair all get the thumbs up from me. We were really lucky in the caliber of prime ministers we saw from 79-07.

Thatcher - Returned the country to Victorian classical liberalism (bar being constitutionally conservative), a ruthless and principled leader there is no doubt the country was a better place when she left than when she came to office. Her main negative point was that she often failed to look at the depths of her policies which although brilliant in principal often created long term problems due to a lack of mitigation.

Major - A true statesman. Won the most votes of any politician, defended Kuwait against the Iraqi oppression and made significant progress with the economy (notably creating a high growth, low inflation, close to trade surplus economy by the time Labour arrived) and also Northern Ireland. It's unfortunate that the party was intent on self destruction in a civil war that made Blair-Brown look like they were hugging each other. A man who did not even go to university and went on to lead the country, an inspiration to me.

Blair - While some people on the right often try attach him to socialism simply because of the party he represented Blair had the unique situation of having no control over the treasury whatsoever which means that he is to be judged solely on domestic and foreign policy. To start with his foreign policy was the stuff of dreams to me, he defended Sierra Lione, liberated Kosovo, deposed the Taliban and crushed Saddam (all with help of course), Blair did more to make the world a better place from the Brits than any government since the empire, a man of conscience. On domestic policy his crime initiatives were somewhat successful and he furthered EU integration. His lack of willingness to depose of Brown was his downfall.

Callahan was probably the worst, he allowed trade unions to run rife.
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Moosferatu
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Difficult to say. Too much of politics is saturated with neoliberal myths retconned far after the era of Thatcher. Who do you believe?
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Snagprophet
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I can't say I know that much about them. I can cross Blair off for simply allowing Gordon to sell our gold cheaply. I really only know Thatcher and Churchill and I know that running a typical cabinet and a war cabinet can't be compared. You could say the one that was in when the NHS started.
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Dr DaMan
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(Original post by Rakas21)
Thatcher, Major and Blair all get the thumbs up from me. We were really lucky in the caliber of prime ministers we saw from 79-07.

Thatcher - Returned the country to Victorian classical liberalism (bar being constitutionally conservative), a ruthless and principled leader there is no doubt the country was a better place when she left than when she came to office. Her main negative point was that she often failed to look at the depths of her policies which although brilliant in principal often created long term problems due to a lack of mitigation.

Major - A true statesman. Won the most votes of any politician, defended Kuwait against the Iraqi oppression and made significant progress with the economy (notably creating a high growth, low inflation, close to trade surplus economy by the time Labour arrived) and also Northern Ireland. It's unfortunate that the party was intent on self destruction in a civil war that made Blair-Brown look like they were hugging each other. A man who did not even go to university and went on to lead the country, an inspiration to me.

Blair - While some people on the right often try attach him to socialism simply because of the party he represented Blair had the unique situation of having no control over the treasury whatsoever which means that he is to be judged solely on domestic and foreign policy. To start with his foreign policy was the stuff of dreams to me, he defended Sierra Lione, liberated Kosovo, deposed the Taliban and crushed Saddam (all with help of course), Blair did more to make the world a better place from the Brits than any government since the empire, a man of conscience. On domestic policy his crime initiatives were somewhat successful and he furthered EU integration. His lack of willingness to depose of Brown was his downfall.

Callahan was probably the worst, he allowed trade unions to run rife.
Not if you lived up north.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by Dr DaMan)
Not if you lived up north.
I do.

Been to Leeds or Manchester lately?
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Dr DaMan
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(Original post by Rakas21)
I do.

Been to Leeds or Manchester lately?
Been to Manchester a few times lately, lovely place.

Were you in Leeds or Manchester during or immediately after she was in charge?
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Gob Bluth
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(Original post by Dr DaMan)
Not if you lived up north.
Or in much of Wales, where it's still a complete mess, where nothing has been done to solve real problems to this day.
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455409
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Clement Attlee. Nationalised the hospitals, gave us huge amounts of social housing, gave independance to India, gave us National Insurance, helped form NATO. What a bloke.

I don't know how any of you can vote for anyone else in this.

I like how the two most popular voted ministers on the poll there are represented by their parties' colours, strange coincidence!
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Monkey.Man
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good lord, someone voted for brown
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Rakas21
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(Original post by Dr DaMan)
Been to Manchester a few times lately, lovely place.

Were you in Leeds or Manchester during or immediately after she was in charge?
Fair enough, I shall rephrase to by the time Major left office.

(Original post by james1211)
Clement Attlee. Nationalised the hospitals, gave us huge amounts of social housing, gave independance to India, gave us National Insurance, helped form NATO. What a bloke.

I don't know how any of you can vote for anyone else in this.

I like how the two most popular voted ministers on the poll there are represented by their parties' colours, strange coincidence!
The systems he set up were actually less generous than now so perhaps some are unduly dismissive.

Giving India Independence was not good however though Wilson did far more to allow the empires death rather than evolution.
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455409
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(Original post by Rakas21)
The systems he set up were actually less generous than now so perhaps some are unduly dismissive.

Giving India Independence was not good however though Wilson did far more to allow the empires death rather than evolution.
Giving independance was better than having it taken from us, which is what arguable would have happened. That or we would have continued to resist it and became the next Assad.
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TheDimpleboy
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(Original post by Dr DaMan)
Not if you lived up north.
Or were homosexual.
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tengentoppa
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I'm guessing the Brown vote is a joke. I went for Attlee, Major and Blair.
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