poejollard
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Hi,

I have applied to KCL for English Language and Communication and I have received an offer

It was my first uni that I visited and I think I loved the London vibe, if anything. It would be my first choice but I think I would need to go on a gap year to save up because I don't think I could cut it without the finances! I don't want to go on a gap year though and have applied to English Language and Linguistics elsewhere (apart from straight Linguistics at UCL). I have been tempted to go to somewhere like York, where I would not necessarily need to go on a gap year to save up (I already have a part-time job) but feel like I'll be losing out on the experience and opportunity King's would have to offer!

I don't particularly want to get a part-time job initially in London however would love to get onto internship programmes in the Summer.

York has an equally interesting course and it looks like a nice place to study. But there's something about London! I think my mind is being slightly polluted with results in League Tables but at the end of the day, although they are both in the top 20 I feel like there will be more opportunities in London.

Any advice is welcomed!
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TheBBQ
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Check what help the university can offer.

I'm not sure but you're going to be having massive tuition fees anyway. Do you think it would be possible to go over your standard limit if you really need to? I don't know the exact details but it is all going to be paid off eventually anyway won't it? Would it matter? Research about this!
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poejollard
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(Original post by TheBBQ)
Check what help the university can offer.

I'm not sure but you're going to be having massive tuition fees anyway. Do you think it would be possible to go over your standard limit if you really need to? I don't know the exact details but it is all going to be paid off eventually anyway won't it? Would it matter? Research about this!
Thanks for your response

Tuition fees are generally £9k wherever you go. However it is the cost of living that I'm worried about. Although those studying in London get a larger maintenance grant I'm unsure as to whether it would be enough still because London is incredibly expensive.

I have looked on King's website and they do have 'King's Student Fund' for those who are basically completely skint but that can range anywhere from £100-£3k and that's if the application is successful. It also says that they recommend that students have around £11k/year (this takes into account a maintenance grant) and covers, accommodation, food etc.
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aplaceforflowers
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Hi! I'm a second year English Language & Literature student at King's. Congrats on the offer

I did not take a gap year. I would say that maybe 30% of people on my course did take one, and quite a few more are over 20, but the majority of people doing English and all other courses are fresh from school. If you don't want to take a gap year, don't do it! Unless you have something you really really want to do with the time, you'll probably regret not going to uni straight away.

Now let's talk money. Yes, London is expensive. But the grant and loan are generous, and King's itself hands out large grants to every student who gets grant from the government. I'm on full grant, and King's gave me a bursary of £1000 in my first year, which increased to £1500 this year. Rent for the halls varies - Hampstead is the cheapest, and places like Moonraker Point (where I ended up) are much more, about £7500 for the year.

If you get an accommodation offer from somewhere cheap (cheap for London, that is), you'll honestly be fine when it comes to other living costs. If you're offered somewhere expensive, you may need your parents to help you until you can pay them back, or get a part-time job, but it shouldn't come down to taking a gap year.

In a typical week living in London now, in my second year, with slightly more experience than last year, I spend:
- about £20 on transport, that is I top my Oyster up £20 a week and that covers my travel to and from campus and anywhere else
- about £30 on food
- £150 on rent
- £10 on electricity, gas and water bills
- £10 on various other small things like books, paper, the occasional shopping trip - they average out to a tenner a week.

If that seems like a lot, don't freak out. It definitely is a lot, but you know what makes me not worry about it? The fact that I'm in London, this incredible city, making friends and connections and learning things that will help me get a job. If I play my cards right, I'll get a job that can pay all this off in 10 years. I definitely hope to continue to live in London after I graduate, because I love it. King's is seriously fantastic.

I hope this helps! If you have any questions about King's, money or English-y subjects, just ask.
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Daniellesirena
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(Original post by aplaceforflowers)
Hi! I'm a second year English Language & Literature student at King's. Congrats on the offer

I did not take a gap year. I would say that maybe 30% of people on my course did take one, and quite a few more are over 20, but the majority of people doing English and all other courses are fresh from school. If you don't want to take a gap year, don't do it! Unless you have something you really really want to do with the time, you'll probably regret not going to uni straight away.

Now let's talk money. Yes, London is expensive. But the grant and loan are generous, and King's itself hands out large grants to every student who gets grant from the government. I'm on full grant, and King's gave me a bursary of £1000 in my first year, which increased to £1500 this year. Rent for the halls varies - Hampstead is the cheapest, and places like Moonraker Point (where I ended up) are much more, about £7500 for the year.

If you get an accommodation offer from somewhere cheap (cheap for London, that is), you'll honestly be fine when it comes to other living costs. If you're offered somewhere expensive, you may need your parents to help you until you can pay them back, or get a part-time job, but it shouldn't come down to taking a gap year.

In a typical week living in London now, in my second year, with slightly more experience than last year, I spend:
- about £20 on transport, that is I top my Oyster up £20 a week and that covers my travel to and from campus and anywhere else
- about £30 on food
- £150 on rent
- £10 on electricity, gas and water bills
- £10 on various other small things like books, paper, the occasional shopping trip - they average out to a tenner a week.

If that seems like a lot, don't freak out. It definitely is a lot, but you know what makes me not worry about it? The fact that I'm in London, this incredible city, making friends and connections and learning things that will help me get a job. If I play my cards right, I'll get a job that can pay all this off in 10 years. I definitely hope to continue to live in London after I graduate, because I love it. King's is seriously fantastic.

I hope this helps! If you have any questions about King's, money or English-y subjects, just ask.

Hello I was wondering if you could possible review your stay at moonraker point?
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poejollard
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(Original post by aplaceforflowers)

I hope this helps! If you have any questions about King's, money or English-y subjects, just ask.
Oh sorry, I have only just seen your message Thank you for the response it has really been helpful! I am 99% firming King's now anyway, weighed up all the pros and cons and as you said, being in a great uni and in London will set me apart from other places. I also found a way to get Lancaster as my insurance as well so if all fails (which hopefully it won't!!) I will have a good backup spot too.

Back to the money side of things, I have just sent off my household income costs but I doubt I will get any extra loan as we narrowly miss the threshold.. It's a bit stupid though as I have 2 other siblings and I'm we are in debt so I'll be living off my own back anyway haha. I'll just have to get a part time job though, I've had one for a couple years anyway :P. Back to the grants that King's give out; I assume they are means tested (i.e. look at household income again).

How are you finding the English Language side of your course?
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aplaceforflowers
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(Original post by Daniellesirena)
Hello I was wondering if you could possible review your stay at moonraker point?
Sorry, I've only just seen this!

Moonraker was absolutely fantastic. In fact I still miss it a year on! The rooms - really expensive, but also gorgeous and brand new (for us anyway). Each room is slightly differently arranged and some are bigger than others, but all have a 3/4 bed and an ensuite. The kitchens are big and spacious, there's a comfy sitting area in each one too, and a balcony. The people at reception are really friendly and helpful, without being intrusive or overly concerned about security - you won't have to sign friends in when they visit, for example, like at some King's halls. There's a really good atmosphere too, it's incredibly easy to make friends.

The only minus point I suppose is that the laundry facilities are only in one block, so a bit of a trek if you're in a different block. Also, the common room was really just sofas to wait for your washing, there wasn't much organised there. But we tended to hang out in our flats anyway so that wasn't a big deal.

Hope that helps!
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aplaceforflowers
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(Original post by poejollard)
Oh sorry, I have only just seen your message Thank you for the response it has really been helpful! I am 99% firming King's now anyway, weighed up all the pros and cons and as you said, being in a great uni and in London will set me apart from other places. I also found a way to get Lancaster as my insurance as well so if all fails (which hopefully it won't!!) I will have a good backup spot too.


How are you finding the English Language side of your course?

My bad, only just seen this. Did you decide to firm your King's offer in the end then?

About English language - I know technically the degree title is 'English Language and Literature', but it's not at all connected to English language as a subject. I'm not even sure why that's the degree name, to be honest. Virtually everything we do is grounded in the study of literature, except for a few modules in the first year which look at texts from a language perspective. Language is really important to essays and suchlike, but it's not at all a different 'side' of the course. Hope that doesn't put you off!
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Daniellesirena
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(Original post by aplaceforflowers)
Sorry, I've only just seen this!

Moonraker was absolutely fantastic. In fact I still miss it a year on! The rooms - really expensive, but also gorgeous and brand new (for us anyway). Each room is slightly differently arranged and some are bigger than others, but all have a 3/4 bed and an ensuite. The kitchens are big and spacious, there's a comfy sitting area in each one too, and a balcony. The people at reception are really friendly and helpful, without being intrusive or overly concerned about security - you won't have to sign friends in when they visit, for example, like at some King's halls. There's a really good atmosphere too, it's incredibly easy to make friends.

The only minus point I suppose is that the laundry facilities are only in one block, so a bit of a trek if you're in a different block. Also, the common room was really just sofas to wait for your washing, there wasn't much organised there. But we tended to hang out in our flats anyway so that wasn't a big deal.

Hope that helps!

Thank you very very much!! I'm so excited. Did you find it sociable and friendly?
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aplaceforflowers
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(Original post by Daniellesirena)
Thank you very very much!! I'm so excited. Did you find it sociable and friendly?
Very much so, especially in the first couple of months when everyone was keen to make new friends. I'm currently living with 2 people I met at Moonraker last year, and am still in touch with literally dozens of others. The atmosphere is really great
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username1327112
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(Original post by aplaceforflowers)
Sorry, I've only just seen this!

Moonraker was absolutely fantastic. In fact I still miss it a year on! The rooms - really expensive, but also gorgeous and brand new (for us anyway). Each room is slightly differently arranged and some are bigger than others, but all have a 3/4 bed and an ensuite. The kitchens are big and spacious, there's a comfy sitting area in each one too, and a balcony. The people at reception are really friendly and helpful, without being intrusive or overly concerned about security - you won't have to sign friends in when they visit, for example, like at some King's halls. There's a really good atmosphere too, it's incredibly easy to make friends.

The only minus point I suppose is that the laundry facilities are only in one block, so a bit of a trek if you're in a different block. Also, the common room was really just sofas to wait for your washing, there wasn't much organised there. But we tended to hang out in our flats anyway so that wasn't a big deal.

Hope that helps!
Thank you very much. I put down Moonraker as my first choice, I really hope I get it!
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poejollard
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(Original post by aplaceforflowers)
My bad, only just seen this. Did you decide to firm your King's offer in the end then?

About English language - I know technically the degree title is 'English Language and Literature', but it's not at all connected to English language as a subject. I'm not even sure why that's the degree name, to be honest. Virtually everything we do is grounded in the study of literature, except for a few modules in the first year which look at texts from a language perspective. Language is really important to essays and suchlike, but it's not at all a different 'side' of the course. Hope that doesn't put you off!
Yeah I have firmed and changed it to 2014 I'm hoping that I'll be able to save up enough... but if not I'll just defer and work abroad or something to mix it up I've seen some really cool TEFL opportunities which could be an insane experience I'm actually looking into applying for Connaught Hall, as when taking into account the location (I'll be in Waterloo and it's only a 10-15 minute cycle away - meaning I can save money from travel), inclusive food (which means if all goes to sh*t at least I know I have food!) the price is quite reasonable

Ah okay fair enough! My course seems like it is very linguistics based. But there are modules such as 'Film and Book' which I have been told has some literature based stuff

I'm quite nervous about moving to London though to be fair, as I live in a pretty small town :P
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