Why are the UK Police Force so hated? Watch

CryptoidAlien
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Why are the Police so hated in this nation? A police who are largely soft compared to the rest of the world yet we speak of them like they're vindictive crooks against society. They're are largely influenced by P-Correctness as we've seen in some cases as well.

It seems like they can't do anything right without being hated on for doing their jobs, and are continually stereotyped for doing their jobs. They can't even stop and search some jumped up youth without getting lip or being accused of race hate.

I don't see what's so bad about them in fact, what happened to 'it's only a minority'. A line I see time, after time, after time on here. Not all Officers are bad people and this hatred of them seems to come from emotionally immature teens and criminals themselves, which says alot....
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AnJuM218
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Well the hate started when Thatcher was PM. Before then policemen had great respect.
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username1039383
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If they weren't so racist and were just, maybe people would actually have a bit of respect for them.

They don't seem to be doing themselves any favours with the random stop and searches (yes, it still does happen)
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CryptoidAlien
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(Original post by AnJuM218)
Well the hate started when Thatcher was PM. Before then policemen had great respect.
Really.....
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Scumbaggio
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They're self serving liars and also frequently incompetent.

Of course there are good and bad police officers and I'm sure the majority of them are basically decent human beings but the police force is justifiably disliked due to the nature of the entire organisation. How corrupt other police forces is totally irrelevant when evaluating the UK police force, you wouldn't put up with an abusive relationship just because there are people in worse ones somewhere out there in the world.
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AnJuM218
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(Original post by CryptoidAlien)
Really.....
True story
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Ripper-Roo
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Take away the uniform and they're just ordinary people who like to think they have some power over us
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Welsh_insomniac
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I have noticed there's a certain lack of connection between the public and the police force here in the UK. I don't feel like I can actually go up and talk to an officer here. They put on a massive front, act very intimidating in situations that doesn't call for it. I had a different experience when I was over in the U.S, where the police actually seemed like people.. rather than robots. Of course, I've heard bad things if you get on the wrong side of them but they seemed like normal people. In the UK, the police act as if they are above the public, which leads me to distrust them.
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Aj12
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The majority of the UK trust the police force. Though a significant minority believe the Police are willing to cover for each other thanks to Pleb Gate http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-24627319

The Police really are not hated that much in the UK. However recent events such as the Mark Duggan inquest (which found the police acted legally) and Plebgate (which showed what morons parts of the police are) has shaken faith in the police and given the public perception of them a rather large dent.
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Scumbaggio
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(Original post by Aj12)
The majority of the UK trust the police force. Though a significant minority believe the Police are willing to cover for each other thanks to Pleb Gate http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-24627319

The Police really are not hated that much in the UK. However recent events such as the Mark Duggan inquest (which found the police acted legally) and Plebgate (which showed what morons parts of the police are) has shaken faith in the police and given the public perception of them a rather large dent.
This definitely happens.

Had it not been an MP they targeted the story would never have made the news.
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Aj12
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(Original post by Scumbaggio)
This definitely happens.

Had it not been an MP they targeted the story would never have made the news.
Question is how rampant is it though? Given that there are plenty of people willing to lie and exaggerate about the police to suit their own agendas. I've known a few people in the police and from what I could gather there are plenty of terrible officers out there but the majority are good hard working people.
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CryptoidAlien
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(Original post by Welsh_insomniac)
I have noticed there's a certain lack of connection between the public and the police force here in the UK. I don't feel like I can actually go up and talk to an officer here. They put on a massive front, act very intimidating in situations that doesn't call for it. I had a different experience when I was over in the U.S, where the police actually seemed like people.. rather than robots. Of course, I've heard bad things if you get on the wrong side of them but they seemed like normal people. In the UK, the police act as if they are above the public, which leads me to distrust them.
They're above the public and no, most people just despise authority. If you don't cross the police they won't cross you.

I've approached police officers and they've been very helpful. The fact yoy find them intimidating is your own issue. They don't 'act' above anyone. People in my experience deliberatley provoke the police and get a high of it, especially in-front of theor friends. You also don't understand how hard their job is.
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AdamskiUK
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Just heard a report on BBC News earlier on saying that the Police Federation, after a 9 month investigation, still has (and maintains) the ability to deny public or even legal requests for access to information about their police cash stores, which could be 'as much as £30m'.

Lol.

The upper echelons of the police are a bunch of infighting, corrupt bas***ds and the everyday bobbies get shafted for it.
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Fizzel
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The police hold everyone to a standard, so for them not to work at that standard is unacceptable. They are normal people but the organisation needs to be absolutely pure. Things like corruption, racism, the perceived lack of accountability, are more so than with another areas. The Met in particular has a poor record of dealing with such issues, and seems more concerned about trying to bury the issues or deal with internally rather than hang some people out to dry and publicly deal with problems. When things then surface, like Lawrence, Menezes, Plebgate, Duggan, it just damages trust in an organisation which lives and dies on its credibility.

I would keep the police out of my life as much as possible tbh. I wouldn't trust them at all, I'll keep my dealings at a mandatory level and via legal representation.
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Gjaykay
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People should rightfully be weary to anyone who holds power over them. As we've seen throughout human history, power corrupts and people are on the whole, weak. The police in some areas abuse their power, some are nice normal people, and others are out to get every who looks at them the wrong way. It's part of human nature.
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AdamskiUK
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(Original post by Fizzel)

I would keep the police out of my life as much as possible tbh. I wouldn't trust them at all, I'll keep my dealings at a mandatory level and via legal representation.
xD You make it sound as if we only have legal representation because they're trained to deal with the bull the police throw at us regarding legal proceedings. In some ways I agree!
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Welsh_insomniac
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(Original post by CryptoidAlien)
They're above the public and no, most people just despise authority. If you don't cross the police they won't cross you.

I've approached police officers and they've been very helpful. The fact yoy find them intimidating is your own issue. They don't 'act' above anyone. People in my experience deliberatley provoke the police and get a high of it, especially in-front of theor friends. You also don't understand how hard their job is.
I do understand how hard their job is. My brother is the London met and he regularly talks about having to do double shifts.

Not that many people deliberately provoke the police. Me and my friends certainly don't. We're a bit too old to play silly games like that. On many occasion, however, the police have tried to provoke us. We've been threatened with dogs, forced to leave a public area just because it's night time. We came out into the field with a telescope, some drinks and food on a summers evening stargazing and having a bit of fun and suddenly two police cars roll up and tell us to go home because it's 1am. We were causing no trouble and about 3 miles away from the nearest farmhouse, why do you have to go home? We politely informed them of what we were doing and still, they told us to go home. In the end they gave us an ultimatum of "go home or you will be charged for loitering and anti social behaviour". That shouldn't happen. Not when you're not causing trouble or seem like you have any intent on causing an issue.
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Scumbaggio
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(Original post by Aj12)
Question is how rampant is it though? Given that there are plenty of people willing to lie and exaggerate about the police to suit their own agendas. I've known a few people in the police and from what I could gather there are plenty of terrible officers out there but the majority are good hard working people.
Very common and the plebgate debacle illustrated that, if they were willing to do this to an MP then why would they hesitate to do it to an ordinary member of the public?

I would say it occurs everywhere and I would suggest every police officer has at some point at least bent the truth for the sake of their colleagues or themselves, on some level that is human nature but you can't be surprised when people dislike the police for being lairs.
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