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    Here's my situation: I'm Polish and had been doing the regular Polish curriculum until I was 15. Then I started my IB program and I've only had classes in English ever since. I'm planning to study in the UK after I'm done with my exams and I'm seriously considering the Arabic & Chinese combo as my degree, although I've been thinking seriously about Russian, Japanese and Spanish (but only in cojunction with a more obscure language). Now, my name and my accent are some obvious giveaways that I'm not a native speaker of English (although the former a little less so, and my accent, if a bit foreign, is not blatantly thick) and I'm afraid that I will not be trusted with any translations other than Polish-English ones. Or is it going to be alright when it comes to written translation and issues will arise with interpretation?
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    (Original post by Slavanna)
    Here's my situation: I'm Polish and had been doing the regular Polish curriculum until I was 15. Then I started my IB program and I've only had classes in English ever since. I'm planning to study in the UK after I'm done with my exams and I'm seriously considering the Arabic & Chinese combo as my degree, although I've been thinking seriously about Russian, Japanese and Spanish (but only in cojunction with a more obscure language). Now, my name and my accent are some obvious giveaways that I'm not a native speaker of English (although the former a little less so, and my accent, if a bit foreign, is not blatantly thick) and I'm afraid that I will not be trusted with any translations other than Polish-English ones. Or is it going to be alright when it comes to written translation and issues will arise with interpretation?
    Why would anyone disregard you as a translator? As long as you know the language up to an advanced level, you are equally eligible to compete with native speakers of that particular language.
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    (Original post by Slavanna)
    Here's my situation: I'm Polish and had been doing the regular Polish curriculum until I was 15. Then I started my IB program and I've only had classes in English ever since. I'm planning to study in the UK after I'm done with my exams and I'm seriously considering the Arabic & Chinese combo as my degree, although I've been thinking seriously about Russian, Japanese and Spanish (but only in cojunction with a more obscure language). Now, my name and my accent are some obvious giveaways that I'm not a native speaker of English (although the former a little less so, and my accent, if a bit foreign, is not blatantly thick) and I'm afraid that I will not be trusted with any translations other than Polish-English ones. Or is it going to be alright when it comes to written translation and issues will arise with interpretation?
    Hallo Jak sie masz?
    I am sure you could become a translator as long as you know your stuff and have the right qualification for it.
 
 
 
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