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    Hi All,

    My main question is, I am hoping to go on to study Maths and Economics at University (split 50/50). Will I still be able to study a masters in either subject despite only doing a dual honours degree?

    Also, if it is possible, when would I have to decide by?

    Thanks in advance & sorry if this has been posted in the wrong section!
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    Yes.

    But forget about that until you've actually done your A levels, done a first degree and got some work experience.
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    Short answer: yes

    Long answer:

    Postgraduate level (Masters/PhD) level Economics is very mathematical, and learning the mathematics is probably harder for most people than learning the economics. Therefore, having an undergraduate mathematics background gives you a good advantage, and you would not be viewed disfavourably compared to someone who done a straight economics degree. If you wanted to best prepare for an Econ masters then you should probably choose as many real analysis and statistics courses as you can when it comes to selecting your optional modules, but this would not have any big impact on your admission prospects.

    Doing a postgraduates Mathematics degree will be slightly more difficult because the fact you have done more non-math courses during undergrad means that you may be weaker than someone who done a straight mathematics degree. Basically, you will have to show the admissions board that this is not the case, and that you have a similar level of mathematical maturity to someone who done a Maths BSc. The best way to do this will be to choose as many difficult math courses as you can, and avoid 'easy' classes. Make sure that in second year you pick at least one analysis and at least one abstract algebra class that a 2nd year Mathematics BSc student would do. Do the same in 3rd year too. I dont know the structure of the program you're applying for, but ideally in first year you would do basic calculus/analysis, in second year you would do a proper real analysis class and an intro to abstract algebra, and then in third year you would take a class in Metric Spaces/Topology/Measure Theory and a class in intermediate abstract algebra. If you done a sequence like that and got good grades, you would have the same chance of getting into a top MSc program as a pure Mathematics BSc.


    However its far too early to be worrying about this sort of thing and there really isnt any need to even think about it until at least the end of your first year. Its impossible to plan now because you probably wont even know what analysis/algebra are until you are a few months into your degree.
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    Thanks for the replies. My question was based on the fact I was curios to see whether I would have closed any options with a joint honours course.
 
 
 
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