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    Ok, so hopefully this September I'll be going to university to study psychology! I know it's a subject that has quite a narrow employment field. So I was wondering what some of them jobs are.... I know you can become a trained psychologists by doing a PhD, but I was wondering if there is other options too? Thanks a lot
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    You can do a number of things. A lot of different grad schemes don't specify a particular degree, just a grade, so management, accounting, HR etc plus teaching, the public sector, masters in social work or nursing for example. Basically anything that doesn't specify a degree subject
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    (Original post by MissDolly96)
    Ok, so hopefully this September I'll be going to university to study psychology! I know it's a subject that has quite a narrow employment field. So I was wondering what some of them jobs are.... I know you can become a trained psychologists by doing a PhD, but I was wondering if there is other options too? Thanks a lot
    Not true. You must do a 3 year doctorate if you want to go into clinical psychology, for example, although a PhD may help you get onto the course. Just a degree alone will not get you into any professional psychology career
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    (Original post by MissDolly96)
    Ok, so hopefully this September I'll be going to university to study psychology! I know it's a subject that has quite a narrow employment field. So I was wondering what some of them jobs are.... I know you can become a trained psychologists by doing a PhD, but I was wondering if there is other options too? Thanks a lot
    In fact, most psychology graduates do not go on to do psychology-related jobs. They will use many of the skills they learnt during the degree, but not necessarily in applied psychology. There is lots you can do. If you get a lot of experience interning/doing society things whilst your an undergrad and cultivate a great CV then there is no end to what you can do (expect of course things that require a specific non-psychology degree!)

    A PhD only directly useful for being a lecturer/researcher or going into a field where you will use those skills, although its good generally for all jobs (unless you get rejected for being "over-qualified"). If you get paid to do it though (if you get funding) then there is no issue in doing it just for the fun- maybe whilst you think of other job options- although you need to be dedicated enough to see it through.
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    Psychology is pretty much worthless unless you have a clear idea of what you want to specialise in, how you will get experience, and attain a very high degree. A lot of graduate schemes are very much focused on a type of degree, you might not need a maths degree, but they usually want something related. Most grad schemes tend to be very business focused so maths, accountancy are probably better choices. I did psychology and a lot of people were interested in my course, like they wish they had done it but they didn't have the grades, as it's popular, but really I regret it. It might see interesting but career wise, it is just rubbish.
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    (Original post by Pip123321)
    Psychology is pretty much worthless unless you have a clear idea of what you want to specialise in, how you will get experience, and attain a very high degree. A lot of graduate schemes are very much focused on a type of degree, you might not need a maths degree, but they usually want something related. Most grad schemes tend to be very business focused so maths, accountancy are probably better choices. I did psychology and a lot of people were interested in my course, like they wish they had done it but they didn't have the grades, as it's popular, but really I regret it. It might see interesting but career wise, it is just rubbish.
    I am about to apply to psychology this year after a gap year, but I'm kinda scared and apprehensive about doing it?

    First I wanted to do engineering, but I knew I wouldn't enjoy it, because I mainly wanted to do it for the career prospects rather than out of interest.

    I have considered everything else from Law to Chemistry, but it's the same story as engineering.

    So I am left with psychology, which I am interested in. But the problem was that I relatively wasted my gap year due to various reasons, and I did not look up course modules/lectures etc.

    I have an interest in psychology, but I did not read enough around the subject in my spare time. So I am scared of being shocked at how different the degree is from my expectations?

    So far, I heard that psychology involves statistics, biology, research etc.

    Other than that I have terrible A level grades, and I can only apply for foundation years, which just makes it worse in terms of what and where I can choose to study.

    Is it really true that most grad schemes are degree specific? From what I've read on TSR most of them just need a 2.1?
    And is it a good idea to get a joint honours in psychology, rather than just a straight psychology degree? But what happens if joint honours are not BPS accredited?
    Can you help me with this?
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    (Original post by nsolma1)
    I am about to apply to psychology this year after a gap year, but I'm kinda scared and apprehensive about doing it?

    First I wanted to do engineering, but I knew I wouldn't enjoy it, because I mainly wanted to do it for the career prospects rather than out of interest.

    I have considered everything else from Law to Chemistry, but it's the same story as engineering.

    So I am left with psychology, which I am interested in. But the problem was that I relatively wasted my gap year due to various reasons, and I did not look up course modules/lectures etc.

    I have an interest in psychology, but I did not read enough around the subject in my spare time. So I am scared of being shocked at how different the degree is from my expectations?

    So far, I heard that psychology involves statistics, biology, research etc.

    Other than that I have terrible A level grades, and I can only apply for foundation years, which just makes it worse in terms of what and where I can choose to study.

    Is it really true that most grad schemes are degree specific? From what I've read on TSR most of them just need a 2.1?
    And is it a good idea to get a joint honours in psychology, rather than just a straight psychology degree? But what happens if joint honours are not BPS accredited?
    Can you help me with this?
    psychology is a much broader subject than people think it is. it is apparently the second most beneficial subject to study! this is because you are learning about people and when applying to jobs outside of psychology, they do like it when people have a psychology degree because it means that you are good with people and have learnt those kind of skills.
    it does involve a lot of statistics because it involves a lot of research. you do learn about biology, but only as it is relevant to the biological approach in psychology. but if you are interested in psychology, it shouldn't really be a problem because it's not going to be as scientific as learning biology in school/college.
    all uni's will have roughly the same modules if they are BPS accredited and i have been told that if they aren't BPS accredited then the degree is basically worthless, but idk how true this is.
    just have a look at different courses in different universities, i used the ucas course finder and have decided where i am applying now to do psychology with counselling
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    (Original post by liv__)
    psychology is a much broader subject than people think it is. it is apparently the second most beneficial subject to study! this is because you are learning about people and when applying to jobs outside of psychology, they do like it when people have a psychology degree because it means that you are good with people and have learnt those kind of skills.
    it does involve a lot of statistics because it involves a lot of research. you do learn about biology, but only as it is relevant to the biological approach in psychology. but if you are interested in psychology, it shouldn't really be a problem because it's not going to be as scientific as learning biology in school/college.
    all uni's will have roughly the same modules if they are BPS accredited and i have been told that if they aren't BPS accredited then the degree is basically worthless, but idk how true this is.
    just have a look at different courses in different universities, i used the ucas course finder and have decided where i am applying now to do psychology with counselling
    Thanks for the help man .

    Like I said, the only degree that interests me now is psychology.
    Of course I could try to study something I am less interested in for the career prospects, but I dread suffering through a 3 year degree and then fail or drop out.

    I should have researched more in my gap year, but because I was gripped by anxiety/depression I kept the thought of university at the back of my mind. Not only that, but I foolishly made the mistake of thinking that applications start before 15th of january, not after.

    But yeah I am dreading to take a 2nd gap year, but at the same time I am scared of going into psychology uninformed? So I am doing my best to look at people's opinions about it, and I am going to start looking at the course modules and look at lectures/homework etc.

    Do you think it's too late at this time of the year now that there's about a month left until the UCAS deadline?

    I have also like you said, heard that psychology is a very broad degree.
    Honestly I just have this stupid fear that it's not seen as a serious subject by employers or something. And this fear kept me chained to wanting to study engineering for so long.


    But yeah thanks for the advise so far
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    (Original post by nsolma1)
    Thanks for the help man .

    Like I said, the only degree that interests me now is psychology.
    Of course I could try to study something I am less interested in for the career prospects, but I dread suffering through a 3 year degree and then fail or drop out.

    I should have researched more in my gap year, but because I was gripped by anxiety/depression I kept the thought of university at the back of my mind. Not only that, but I foolishly made the mistake of thinking that applications start before 15th of january, not after.

    But yeah I am dreading to take a 2nd gap year, but at the same time I am scared of going into psychology uninformed? So I am doing my best to look at people's opinions about it, and I am going to start looking at the course modules and look at lectures/homework etc.

    Do you think it's too late at this time of the year now that there's about a month left until the UCAS deadline?

    I have also like you said, heard that psychology is a very broad degree.
    Honestly I just have this stupid fear that it's not seen as a serious subject by employers or something. And this fear kept me chained to wanting to study engineering for so long.


    But yeah thanks for the advise so far
    the UCAS deadline is the 15th of January, they just want it in as soon as possible and the earlier it's submitted the better chance you have of getting a place. however, my teacher in college who is helping us all with our uni stuff said people do actually apply later and people have applied as late as April/May and still managed to get a place in a university! so if i were you i'd try not to worry, you have plenty of time to get things all sorted

    i think people think psychology is literally just about mental health and becoming a psychologist, when really this is just one aspect of the subject! if this is the only subject you are interested in then you should do it, there would be nothing worse than studying a course you are not interested in for a whole 3 years! and plus, if you're interested in it you'll probably do really well
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    (Original post by liv__)
    the UCAS deadline is the 15th of January, they just want it in as soon as possible and the earlier it's submitted the better chance you have of getting a place. however, my teacher in college who is helping us all with our uni stuff said people do actually apply later and people have applied as late as April/May and still managed to get a place in a university! so if i were you i'd try not to worry, you have plenty of time to get things all sorted

    i think people think psychology is literally just about mental health and becoming a psychologist, when really this is just one aspect of the subject! if this is the only subject you are interested in then you should do it, there would be nothing worse than studying a course you are not interested in for a whole 3 years! and plus, if you're interested in it you'll probably do really well
    Don't postpone the application to apply after 15th of January though. I almost did that and wasted so much time, when I could have done my research about the course so much earlier.

    UCAS says that before 15th of jan all applications will be guaranteed "equal consideration" and I have read sometimes that it doesn't matter if you apply close to the deadline.

    But after 15th of jan, the universities will only consider you if they have spaces left, but I'm not sure, but I don't think they're too strict on this. I think you could always apply to after 15th and also still try clearing. I think as long as we apply for this year's application cycle we should be fine

    I definitely agree with you about how psychology is perceived. Though in the beginning I used to have somewhat the same mentality.
    But now that I have read more about it, it's definitely not just about Freud and mental health all the time.
    Like you said it's very wide and can go from research and statistics to biology and neuroscience.

    Which makes it very good, because if you want to transfer to a different career, you then have these various skills which you could then apply in them. And most people have said that your undergrad doesn't really matter for graduate schemes/jobs, as long as you get a 2.1 and work experience you will be taken seriously.

    And about doing degrees I'm interested in, I agree, it's massively important, I only see it now.

    I kind of disliked maths at A level, I could tolerate it, but like I said I didn't do well at it because I was going through loads of anxiety/depression at that time. And it made it harder for me to keep up with the maths.

    But even then, I wasn't really interested in maths, and now that I look back, it would have been a HUGE mistake to go into an engineering degree, which is basically all about maths while at the same time struggle with that exact same depression/anxiety I was going through. I would have failed miserably...:eek:
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    (Original post by nsolma1)
    I am about to apply to psychology this year after a gap year, but I'm kinda scared and apprehensive about doing it?

    First I wanted to do engineering, but I knew I wouldn't enjoy it, because I mainly wanted to do it for the career prospects rather than out of interest.

    I have considered everything else from Law to Chemistry, but it's the same story as engineering.

    So I am left with psychology, which I am interested in. But the problem was that I relatively wasted my gap year due to various reasons, and I did not look up course modules/lectures etc.

    I have an interest in psychology, but I did not read enough around the subject in my spare time. So I am scared of being shocked at how different the degree is from my expectations?

    So far, I heard that psychology involves statistics, biology, research etc.

    Other than that I have terrible A level grades, and I can only apply for foundation years, which just makes it worse in terms of what and where I can choose to study.

    Is it really true that most grad schemes are degree specific? From what I've read on TSR most of them just need a 2.1?
    And is it a good idea to get a joint honours in psychology, rather than just a straight psychology degree? But what happens if joint honours are not BPS accredited?
    Can you help me with this?

    have you thought about going down the apprenticeship route instead? a lot of people i know wish they had done that, as the apprenticess are higher up than us as they are training, whilst we're not, we're also on the same pay, depressing.

    engineering would give you more career prospects but its probably gonna be hard if your not a technical person or that interested. psychology isnt really that hard, but you should focus more on what a degree will you give you in terms of career prospects and what you really want to do with it.
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    (Original post by Pip123321)
    have you thought about going down the apprenticeship route instead? a lot of people i know wish they had done that, as the apprenticess are higher up than us as they are training, whilst we're not, we're also on the same pay, depressing.

    engineering would give you more career prospects but its probably gonna be hard if your not a technical person or that interested. psychology isnt really that hard, but you should focus more on what a degree will you give you in terms of career prospects and what you really want to do with it.
    Mmm...

    I mainly wanted to do psychology to become a psychotherapist, write books, maybe do research with neuroscience or enter a differnet psychology field if I become interested in it later.

    But I have read many horror stories here about how oversubscribed and competitive psychologyis to even have a chance at postgraduate training?

    Look at clinical psychology for example, it's near impossible to even get into it, I have heard that at one point it was even harder to get into than graduate medicine!?:confused:

    If it's hard to get into psychology for work, this would leave me with other careers through graduate schemes and jobs? But I have heard that these are also very competitive and filter based on ucas points?

    I have thought about apprenticeships, but honestly I find them too rigid and inflexible. I feel that the companies would want to keep you working there as long as possible, and you would end up being stuck at the same type of work at the same company?

    I will still look for psychology apprenticeships if they have them though. And also I forgot to mention that apprenticeship might not even consider me since I have massively screwed up my A levels?

    engineering would give you more career prospects but its probably gonna be hard if your not a technical person or that interested. psychology isnt really that hard, but you should focus more on what a degree will you give you in terms of career prospects and what you really want to do with it.
    Yeah this is a massive dilemma I am going through at the moment.
    I dropped the idea of doing engineering because I knew I would fail at it, and I would be only doing it for career prospects.

    I think I might need to look at doing a psychology degree that is more vocational like psychotherapy for example?But then I would probably still be in the same situation since postgraduate psychology is just too competitive.

    I mean I could do a degree for the career prospects, but I know sooner or later I would fail because of it, and I am trying to avoid repeating what happened to me at A level. When I took "hard" science and maths subjects for the "future" and better "career prospects", but ended up failing them.I would have been much better off studying easy A levels and getting those ucas points at that time.
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    (Original post by MissDolly96)
    Ok, so hopefully this September I'll be going to university to study psychology! I know it's a subject that has quite a narrow employment field. So I was wondering what some of them jobs are.... I know you can become a trained psychologists by doing a PhD, but I was wondering if there is other options too? Thanks a lot
    To be honest psychology is extremely narrow and extremely competitive. And somewhat overlooked. I'd only do it if you know its 100% sure that its what you want to do.

    I'd say combining it with a subject would be a very wise idea. What are you thinking of combining it with? What A-Levels do you have? They're a BPS accediated joint honours courses. For example, there was people at my university who studied biology and psychology 50:50. Thatd be a good subject to combine it with. To be accredited, you basically have to do so many modules that the BPS want you to do. The people on combined honors do all these then go off and do the other subject whilst the single honours do 'supplementary' modules.

    I'm kind of kicking myself for not doing Spanish and Psychology combined now. But my Spanish is good enough to teach KS3
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    (Original post by o-glez)
    To be honest psychology is extremely narrow and extremely competitive. And somewhat overlooked. I'd only do it if you know its 100% sure that its what you want to do.

    I'd say combining it with a subject would be a very wise idea. What are you thinking of combining it with? What A-Levels do you have? They're a BPS accediated joint honours courses. For example, there was people at my university who studied biology and psychology 50:50. Thatd be a good subject to combine it with. To be accredited, you basically have to do so many modules that the BPS want you to do. The people on combined honors do all these then go off and do the other subject whilst the single honours do 'supplementary' modules.

    I'm kind of kicking myself for not doing Spanish and Psychology combined now. But my Spanish is good enough to teach KS3
    Actually I have to disagree with you on it being narrow. It is one of the only subjects I know of that covers both essay writing related skills (like English/History etc.) and some of the data analysis skills (like the sciences). It is more tricky if you want to teach, although you can certainly go onto primary teaching (I did), and I know at least one person who did a Biology PGCE. There are also Subject Knowledge Enhancement courses for some of the less popular subjects like maths. It can be overlooked by employers, but not ones who know what they are doing and many grad schemes don't specific a degree subject or even area
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    (Original post by *Interrobang*)
    Actually I have to disagree with you on it being narrow. It is one of the only subjects I know of that covers both essay writing related skills (like English/History etc.) and some of the data analysis skills (like the sciences). It is more tricky if you want to teach, although you can certainly go onto primary teaching (I did), and I know at least one person who did a Biology PGCE. There are also Subject Knowledge Enhancement courses for some of the less popular subjects like maths. It can be overlooked by employers, but not ones who know what they are doing and many grad schemes don't specific a degree subject or even area
    It does develop quite a lot of useful skills, you've got a point there.
    Did you do Psychology then and went into Primary teaching? That's what I'm planning to do. Some universities will look at Psychology degrees for Biology, you're right, but I'd say you need an A-Level too. There are no SKE's for Biology. I think it depends on what part of the country you're in too
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    (Original post by o-glez)
    It does develop quite a lot of useful skills, you've got a point there.
    Did you do Psychology then and went into Primary teaching? That's what I'm planning to do. Some universities will look at Psychology degrees for Biology, you're right, but I'd say you need an A-Level too. There are no SKE's for Biology. I think it depends on what part of the country you're in too
    I did, altho I decided not to go into teaching after the course. Yeah she probably did have an A Level in Biology, I forgot to mention that. Some unis may have more of a focus on the biological side of psychology, so you might be able to sell it that way too, although the A Level will definitely help. I think there are SKEs for the other sciences and maths.
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    (Original post by nsolma1)
    Mmm...

    I mainly wanted to do psychology to become a psychotherapist, write books, maybe do research with neuroscience or enter a differnet psychology field if I become interested in it later.

    But I have read many horror stories here about how oversubscribed and competitive psychologyis to even have a chance at postgraduate training?

    Look at clinical psychology for example, it's near impossible to even get into it, I have heard that at one point it was even harder to get into than graduate medicine!?:confused:

    If it's hard to get into psychology for work, this would leave me with other careers through graduate schemes and jobs? But I have heard that these are also very competitive and filter based on ucas points?

    I have thought about apprenticeships, but honestly I find them too rigid and inflexible. I feel that the companies would want to keep you working there as long as possible, and you would end up being stuck at the same type of work at the same company?

    I will still look for psychology apprenticeships if they have them though. And also I forgot to mention that apprenticeship might not even consider me since I have massively screwed up my A levels?



    Yeah this is a massive dilemma I am going through at the moment.
    I dropped the idea of doing engineering because I knew I would fail at it, and I would be only doing it for career prospects.

    I think I might need to look at doing a psychology degree that is more vocational like psychotherapy for example?But then I would probably still be in the same situation since postgraduate psychology is just too competitive.

    I mean I could do a degree for the career prospects, but I know sooner or later I would fail because of it, and I am trying to avoid repeating what happened to me at A level. When I took "hard" science and maths subjects for the "future" and better "career prospects", but ended up failing them.I would have been much better off studying easy A levels and getting those ucas points at that time.
    Well when your trying to get into further study or graduates schemes, they. Will request high alevels results. If you know what you wanna do in psychology and work hard to get relevant volunteer work whilst you do your degree, then you should be ok.
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    (Original post by Pip123321)
    Well when your trying to get into further study or graduates schemes, they. Will request high alevels results. If you know what you wanna do in psychology and work hard to get relevant volunteer work whilst you do your degree, then you should be ok.
    Yep, I want to do psychology, but I'm scared that it's just too competitive in the UK,

    I'm looking to maybe study it in the Netherlands.

    My mum has confused me again and warned me that I would be left without work if I do psychology and that it would take too long to find work in it.

    Then I thought about doing radiology or engineering again, but I'm not happy about this since I would be doing it just for the job security, not because I am that interested in these degrees?
 
 
 
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