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    Hello,

    I am in Sixth Form, studying towards A levels in Maths, Further Maths, Chemistry, Physics and Computing, with an EPQ in Quantum Physics.

    I am very interested in investment banking, consultancy, or actuarial sciences as a profession.

    So my question is whether there are any specific requirements that banks look for, when accepting people onto graduate schemes (I assume it is graduate schemes which lead to employment).

    I was looking to study physics, at Imperial or Oxford. Would this be appropriate, and is there any work experience I could get (I'm in Year 12)?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by FelixTheKat)
    Hello,

    I am very interested in investment banking, consultancy, or actuarial sciences as a profession.

    I was looking to study physics, at Imperial or Oxford. Would this be appropriate, and is there any work experience I could get (I'm in Year 12)?

    Thanks
    Why are you "very interested in investment banking, consultancy, or actuarial sciences as a profession."? That's something you'll need to articulate well to yourself and employers.
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    (Original post by FelixTheKat)
    Hello,

    I am in Sixth Form, studying towards A levels in Maths, Further Maths, Chemistry, Physics and Computing, with an EPQ in Quantum Physics.

    I am very interested in investment banking, consultancy, or actuarial sciences as a profession.

    So my question is whether there are any specific requirements that banks look for, when accepting people onto graduate schemes (I assume it is graduate schemes which lead to employment).

    I was looking to study physics, at Imperial or Oxford. Would this be appropriate, and is there any work experience I could get (I'm in Year 12)?

    Thanks
    Consultancy doesn't ask for any particular degree, though anything numerate is preferred. Having said that, you'll always find some with Classics, Music, etc.

    Actuarial prefers Maths and Economics and obviously Actuarial Science. If you really want to qualify in record time, take the Actuarial degree, followed by the one year Masters. That could give you exemptions to all the exams, assuming you did well, though you'd still need a few years work experience before qualifying.

    Some roles in banks require specific degrees, others don't.

    Which area of banking are you most interested in?
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    A Level Insight Programmes > Spring Weeks (1st Year) > Summer Analyst (2nd Year) > Job Offer

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    (Original post by will2348)
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    A Level Insight Programmes > Spring Weeks (1st Year) > Summer Analyst (2nd Year) > Job Offer

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    This.

    The earlier your exposure and network building starts, the better chance you have of getting to that last stage.
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    Thank you. So would Physics be considered a numerate degree?
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    (Original post by FelixTheKat)
    Thank you. So would Physics be considered a numerate degree?
    Yes
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    (Original post by FelixTheKat)
    Thank you. So would Physics be considered a numerate degree?
    To a layman, even a maths degree is considered numerate.

    Physics at the degree level involves a lot more maths than A-Level. There was a time when in order to study Simple Harmonic Motion in A-Level Physics, you had to solve differential equations.

    So those who want to do a Physics degree but not the maths had better think again.

    A maths degree (at a good place anyway) is all algebra, ie no numbers because you cannot use numbers to prove anything.

    That's why, in general, a calculator is useless for a maths degree.
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    (Original post by dugdugdug)
    To a layman, even a maths degree is considered numerate.

    Physics at the degree level involves a lot more maths than A-Level. There was a time when in order to study Simple Harmonic Motion in A-Level Physics, you had to solve differential equations.

    So those who want to do a Physics degree but not the maths had better think again.

    A maths degree (at a good place anyway) is all algebra, ie no numbers because you cannot use numbers to prove anything.

    That's why, in general, a calculator is useless for a maths degree.
    I totally agree. I find behind all the analogies or over simplifications in the A-level course, there exists very fundamental mathematics
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    Use your free time to get involved in a diverse range of activities. This will give you things to talk about at interviews and persuade potential employers that you are well rounded (whatever that means).
 
 
 
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