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Better to have a 2:2 from a highly ranked uni or a 2:1 from a low ranked one? watch

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    When it comes to applying for jobs after university, do people think it's better to have a 2:2 from a highly ranked uni or a 2:1 from a low ranked one?

    Do people think it would be more difficult to achieve a 2:1 at a higher ranked university, since they presumably would have higher standards? (since they have higher standards for entry)

    Most graduate schemes seem to require a 2:1, but would grade always take such prominence?

    Assuming two candidates for a position have the exact same experience, skills, degree subject etc, but one has a 2:2 from a highly ranked uni and one has a 2:1 from a low ranked one, who do people think will be more successful?
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    From what I understand, many employers will screen you out automatically with a 2:2 or less for a graduate scheme.

    Maybe, if you are at a very good University (IE Oxbridge), you could be the exception. However, apart from that, I am not so sure.
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    2.1 at any university.

    Source: learnt the hard way working harder than necessary at a "good" uni
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    I've seen some employers ask for 1st class degree from a RG but only a 2:1 if from Oxbridge, but in general, most employers simply screen out 2:2 and under.
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    It's this thread...again!

    The general answer is that it's better to have a 2i over a 2ii because most places will automatically screen out a 2ii. If the entry requirements for the job are a 2i and you have a 2ii, it's kinda obvious what will happen - you'll filter out of the application, regardless of how great you might be (I've even heard of companies with online application which stop once you put anything lower than a 2i in). Obviously there are exceptions, and if you went somewhere great and have done a huge amount of relevant work experience, or there are massive exceptional circumstances then you may (but probably won't) stand a chance. Think of it like uni applications - if you don't meet the basic requirements, then you've pretty much shot yourself in the foot.
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    2.1 any day of the week.

    2.1 from Brunel > 2.2 from LSE.
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    A 2.1 from University of Thames Valley Met Trinity Trent City in BA Handwriting studies would beat a 2.2 in Maths from UCL in almost all circumstances. Unfortunate but true. You are better off going to some average uni doing a management degree so you have spare time to do internships etc than trying hard at a tough subject/good uni.
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    (Original post by chloedabell)
    Most graduate schemes seem to require a 2:1, but would grade always take such prominence?
    Usually, yes, especially in the large graduate schemes. They need to cut numbers down as quickly as possible. One of the best ways to do this is auto-reject those with 2:2s or below as these people failed to meet the minimum standard that employer expects.

    Someone who received a 2:2 and has mitigating circumstances, or in some cases a Masters, often won't be filtered out. But the rest will.

    There will usually still be a sufficient number of people from "strong" universities who will go to the next stage. Though some employers will be concerned about standards at certain universities, and/or have their own preferred universities based on previous experience, many aren't as snobby about university brand name. They will see the classification as the most important thing.

    Assuming two candidates for a position have the exact same experience, skills, degree subject etc, but one has a 2:2 from a highly ranked uni and one has a 2:1 from a low ranked one, who do people think will be more successful?
    It doesn't work like that. It's very unlikely that people will have the same experience and skills. There will always be someone who did better in the psychometric tests, or other online tests, or the group exercise at the assessment centre, or the interview and so on. There's just so much to consider that can have far more relevance to the actual graduate position than a university brand name or even degree classification.

    But if a 2:1 was required, the person with the 2:2 would usually be filtered out much earlier for it to happen.

    Oh, and this has been discussed to death before. We almost had weekly threads on "what's best a 2:2 from Oxbridge or 2:1 from an ex-poly", plus "2:1 from a Russell Group university and first from an ex-poly". I suppose Careers can have one (not that I have any choice in that :p: ) but check the ones in unis if you're interested. Very interesting reading.
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    A 2:1 degree is the bare minimum requirement for the vast majority of graduate schemes, so the 2:2 graduate wouldn't even be able to apply, or would be instantly rejected.

    In reality, top employers aren't impressed by top universities on CVs because they see it all the time, and situations where two candidate are otherwise identical apart from the universities they attended never occur either.
 
 
 
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