any university in the US that doesn't require GMAT/GRE ?

Watch
fineas
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#1
Im graduating with an expected 2:1 LSE this year and want to take a master in America to study business/management. According to what people say most of them require an entrance test but there must be some exceptions, no ?
0
reply
sj27
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#2
Report 6 years ago
#2
There might be, but I've never come across one. What is your resistance to doing a test?
0
reply
Tcannon
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#3
Report 6 years ago
#3
The good programmes require GMAT/GRE, just suck it up, get some books and study in lib for a few weeks. You can take the test multiple times. It should be doable for you with a 2.1 from LSE.

To answer your q, Uni of Phoenix is a degree mill in the US, but its MSc/MBA are dreadful.
0
reply
madamemerle
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#4
Report 6 years ago
#4
(Original post by Tcannon)
The good programmes require GMAT/GRE, just suck it up, get some books and study in lib for a few weeks. You can take the test multiple times. It should be doable for you with a 2.1 from LSE.

To answer your q, Uni of Phoenix is a degree mill in the US, but its MSc/MBA are dreadful.
Phoenix is a for profit college, its degrees are not respected at all - it is exploitative and profit driven. There are many genuine institutions of learning that don't require the GRE, particularly in certain subjects: Columbia's humanities PhD programs rarely require the GRE. I imagine, in business programs, which tend to be more focused on quantitative attainment for entrance, that there are not that many places that don't ask for a standardized exam. You'll just have to go through uni websites to figure that out - either that, or as TCannon says, suck it up and take the test. Neither is that hard.
0
reply
sj27
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report 6 years ago
#5
(Original post by madamemerle)
Phoenix is a for profit college, its degrees are not respected at all - it is exploitative and profit driven. There are many genuine institutions of learning that don't require the GRE, particularly in certain subjects: Columbia's humanities PhD programs rarely require the GRE. I imagine, in business programs, which tend to be more focused on quantitative attainment for entrance, that there are not that many places that don't ask for a standardized exam. You'll just have to go through uni websites to figure that out - either that, or as TCannon says, suck it up and take the test. Neither is that hard.
That's interesting... Their politics department requires GRE!
0
reply
AcquaLife
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#6
Report 6 years ago
#6
I can attest being an American that all this is true. If you are going to come to America do yourself a favor and take the GRE/GMAT so you can get into a worth while school. Otherwise it would be a waste
0
reply
madamemerle
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#7
Report 6 years ago
#7
(Original post by sj27)
That's interesting... Their politics department requires GRE!
Oh, wait....maybe I'm mixing up the subject GRE and the ordinary GRE in my recollection. In any case, there are some reputable departments in my subject that don't require the ordinary GRE.
0
reply
Tcannon
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#8
Report 6 years ago
#8
I am sure that there are plenty study groups for GRE/GMAT at LSE given the number of students applying to US programmes. If you need some guidance, you can even sign up with some GMAT prep courses. They are rather expensive and mostly for those who are out of practice or too busy. With some self-discipline, you can do it yourself. Manhattan GMAT is possibly the best prep course book and comes with practice CD. I am not a big fan of Kaplan and Princeton GMAT study books.

Most top or even mid tier US management programmes require GMAT or GRE, I would be wary of a programme without this requirement. Good news for you, LSE is regarded as strong UK feeder school and adcom know its reputation.
0
reply
The Owl of Minerva
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#9
Report 6 years ago
#9
If you are looking to leave LSE with a 2:1 then please do not undermine an otherwise promising academic/professional career by going to a university with lax entry standards.

Sure the GRE is not fair, but from experience, I can tell you its doable. Just try it!!!

Also the GRE will always be an admissions requirement for competitive universities because it is used to sift and filter huge amounts of applications early on. Any university in the US that waives that requirement is suspect.
0
reply
kobekko
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#10
Report 6 years ago
#10
GRE is not particularly difficult. The vocabulary may take some extra time to study, since it's not necessarily stuff you would see every day. The quantitative stuff is basic maths that most people learn much earlier than university (even in America). For the writing, I would say practice doing time tests. I think you can also find the potential topics online, so it might be good to have something prepared for each.

Once you take the test, the scores are valid for 5 years and it's good for many programs. Business schools traditionally only took GMAT, but the ones taking GRE are growing.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Current uni students - are you thinking of dropping out of university?

Yes, I'm seriously considering dropping out (12)
19.67%
I'm not sure (2)
3.28%
No, I'm going to stick it out for now (18)
29.51%
I have already dropped out (3)
4.92%
I'm not a current university student (26)
42.62%

Watched Threads

View All