Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Okay so I'm doing a project in A2 Use of Maths, and for my project I need an aproximate value for the volume that an average sized packet of crisps would fill. Currently, I don't have a clue. It doesn't really matter how the volume is worked out.

    If someone could give me an aproximate value that would be awesome. c:
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Name:  Untitled.png
Views: 214
Size:  655 Bytes

    is the equation for the volume of a sphere. Where V is the volume and r is the radius. So if you have a value for the radius of the of the packet you will get an approximate volume. A crisp packet could be made into a spherical shape so I don't see why the above equation would not work.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Fill an empty bag of crisps with water and measure the volume of water needed to fill it
    1 ml = 1 cm^3


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    As people have said, fill it with water so it forms a sphere and then use the eqaution for the volume of a sphere. I don't think it's quite a2 though.
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by Liamnut)
    As people have said, fill it with water so it forms a sphere and then use the eqaution for the volume of a sphere. I don't think it's quite a2 though.
    It won't form a sphere and it doesn't need to. It might leak though!
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Fill a container with water then sink a sealed bag of crisps in it so some of the water is displaced.
    Measure how much water is required to refill the container
    Eureka

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Can't you shape it like a cuboid and find an approximation from that?
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by gdunne42)
    Fill a container with water then sink a sealed bag of crisps in it so some of the water is displaced.
    Measure how much water is required to refill the container
    Eureka

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Nice idea but I'm sure the crisps will float.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    I'm sure you could do something needlessly complicated using volumes of revolution if you wanted to magic it to A2 standard
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Wwdddfgggggggggggggggggggggggggg gffffgfggggggggggggggggggggggggg ggggggggggdddwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww wwwsw

    EDIT: sorry my alpine marmot Eric got to the keyboard
    Spoiler:
    Show
    he is a fluffy toy
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mr M)
    Nice idea but I'm sure the crisps will float.

    not if you attach a weight to them which is greater than the weight of the water the bag of chips has to displace (leave the weight in though so it continues to displacing the same amount of water). so you could probably find a 5 pound weight and attach a clothes pin or some kind of spring loaded clamp to it so you can easily release the crisps and it'll probably submerge the bag.
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Study Helper
    (Original post by Mr M)
    Nice idea but I'm sure the crisps will float.
    Push it in?
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    Turn on your tap so water is flowing out at a steady rate. Time how long it takes to fill up a bag of crisps, then fill up a cylindrical class for the same amount of time with the tap flowing at roughly the same rate and then calculate the volume of water in the class.

    The volume of water in the crisp should be approximately the same as the volume of water in the cup if you managed to time it correctly and get water flowing out at a reasonably steady rate.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lord Frieza)
    Can't you shape it like a cuboid and find an approximation from that?
    BINGO! (ish)

    take the (empty) bag of crisps and split it down each side.

    measure the length and breadth and multiply these together.

    Divide this by 6 (this will give you the (approximate) area of each square needed to form a cube).

    Take the square root of this (this will give you the approximate length of the cube`s side.)

    Cube it, and.....

    (i`ve already done it)

    (be interested to see what anyone gets for a (average) 14g bag) - packet of Ringos!
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: January 23, 2014
Poll
Are you going to a festival?
Useful resources

Make your revision easier

Maths

Maths Forum posting guidelines

Not sure where to post? Read the updated guidelines here

Equations

How to use LaTex

Writing equations the easy way

Student revising

Study habits of A* students

Top tips from students who have already aced their exams

Study Planner

Create your own Study Planner

Never miss a deadline again

Polling station sign

Thinking about a maths degree?

Chat with other maths applicants

Can you help? Study help unanswered threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.