Can anyone give me an idea of what it is like to be an electrical engineer?

Watch
Ilak01
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#1
I am in year 12 at the moment, and I am not too sure of what I would like to study in university. I like the idea of engineering, because I heard that it involves a lot of maths and science.

However, I heard that the employers are very fussy about female engineers. Also, I want to do a course that will help me get a high paid job, but I am not too sure about engineers' salary.

I would be really grateful for any thoughts
Thank you
0
reply
Smack
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 6 years ago
#2
What do you mean "employers are very fussy about female engineers"?
0
reply
Ilak01
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#3
(Original post by Smack)
What do you mean "employers are very fussy about female engineers"?
Apparently companies try to avoid employing female engineers because women are entitled to more holidays than men in terms of maternity leaves. One of my family friend wasn't offered a job because of this reason.
0
reply
Pessimisterious
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#4
Report 6 years ago
#4
(Original post by Ilak01)
One of my family friend wasn't offered a job because of this reason.
And how does she know this?

Anyway if you want a job just for financial gains, you're in it for the wrong reasons. I don't care abut gender, but I would never be happy employing someone who just wanted the money.


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
ElChapo
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#5
Report 6 years ago
#5
Some say engineering starting salaries are very good, but the progression over time is not as good

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
Clip
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#6
Report 6 years ago
#6
Go and buy all the Dilbert comic books, and that will tell you everything you need to know about being an electrical engineer. Not joking. 100% serious.
0
reply
Pessimisterious
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#7
Report 6 years ago
#7
On a serious note -

Two of my flatmates are electrical engineering students. One of them already worked full time doing it in brazil (his home country). He said he fixed a lot of lifts and other typical pieces of major electrical hardware. His goal is to work with really big stuff - pylons, cranes, etc.

Currently he's studying electronic engineering, which differs from electrical engineering in that electronic is, well, more on the 'electron level', so it deals with mobile phones, computer circuitry, etc. He prefers the large stuff over the fiddly circuitry stuff.


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
Smack
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#8
Report 6 years ago
#8
(Original post by Ilak01)
Apparently companies try to avoid employing female engineers because women are entitled to more holidays than men in terms of maternity leaves.
Not true in the slightest.

One of my family friend wasn't offered a job because of this reason.
If that is genuinely true then I smell a lawsuit...
1
reply
pheonix254
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#9
Report 6 years ago
#9
We are flat out desperate in our company to employ female engineers. They're woefully under-represented in the sector as a whole.

And yes, if you're discriminated against because of your gender (just like race, disability, religion), then the employer is breaking the law and risks having the book thrown at them. As interviewers in interviews we are very clearly told that we are judging ability and character. Nothing else whatsoever can be taken into consideration, not the fact they're in a wheel chair, come from a different part of the world to you, have a different chromosome set, or have made it clear that they want a family - nothing.

You cannot discriminate, and engineering companies know this better than most. That's not to say rogue interviewers don't exist, but they are definitely not the majority in this sector. Quite simply, a lawsuit would not only be hugely damaging financially, but it would destroy the image of the company too - why would we risk it? Yes, there are going to be some old-timers in the industry that might still hold outdated views that women can only work as secretaries or nurses, but that is most definitely a dying breed, thankfully. There are lots of extra opportunities for women in the engineering sector, and we are actively trying to recruit and promote to women as we recognise there is a gender imbalance that needs rectifying.

With regards to engineering salaries, firstly there is no difference based on gender, secondly, the salaries are reasonable. It's perfectly possible to get highly paid jobs in engineering, though we generally don't work 80 hour weeks like investment bankers might, and as such, if it's money rather than job interest that you're after, engineering might not be for you. We're not badly paid - most of us are significantly above the UK average garduate salary for instance, and STEM graduates earn more than graduates, who earn more than non-graduates - an engineering degree is certainly worth the extra investment, and the beauty of the engineering degree (of whatever flavour) is that it really doesn't prevent you from doing anything.

My coursemates work in Aerospace, telephony and transport, but also in law, banking, project management, conservation, financial services, education, start-ups, and renewable technologies all over the world. We've all got the same degree and most importantly, we're all employed in something we enjoy doing. Very few other disciplines can boast that fact.
2
reply
455409
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#10
Report 6 years ago
#10
(Original post by Smack)
Not true in the slightest.



If that is genuinely true then I smell a lawsuit...
Nonsense, it happens and employers won't be sued for it because they can say they didn't hire them for a different reason, nobody can prove it. You're naive if you think this doesn't happen.
0
reply
pheonix254
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#11
Report 6 years ago
#11
(Original post by james1211)
Nonsense, it happens and employers won't be sued for it because they can say they didn't hire them for a different reason, nobody can prove it. You're naive if you think this doesn't happen.
But using this as an excuse not to do engineering is pathetic. Times are changing, and the large engineering companies all have HR departments dedicated to stamping this out, as it is taken very seriously. Interviewees have Freedom of Information act rights to get the information companies hold on them, which includes interview transcripts (if taken) and notes. They can also have CVs of other candidates reviewed if they believe that discrimination has taken place, and force the company to explain themselves.

Discrimination is a legal minefield, and any reputable company is going to play by the rules here or open themselves up, needlessly, to huge potential ramifications. I'm not saying it doesn't happen. I'm saying that in the past 10 years, the consequences, if proven, are now huge, and as such any sensible business will mitigate against this risk appropriately.
0
reply
455409
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#12
Report 6 years ago
#12
(Original post by pheonix254)
But using this as an excuse not to do engineering is pathetic. Times are changing, and the large engineering companies all have HR departments dedicated to stamping this out, as it is taken very seriously. Interviewees have Freedom of Information act rights to get the information companies hold on them, which includes interview transcripts (if taken) and notes. They can also have CVs of other candidates reviewed if they believe that discrimination has taken place, and force the company to explain themselves.

Discrimination is a legal minefield, and any reputable company is going to play by the rules here or open themselves up, needlessly, to huge potential ramifications. I'm not saying it doesn't happen. I'm saying that in the past 10 years, the consequences, if proven, are now huge, and as such any sensible business will mitigate against this risk appropriately.
I agree with you, but saying you "smell a lawsuit" is crazy. Vast majority of these things, on the rare occasions they happen, are never found out by the interviewee or they are told it was for another reason.
0
reply
Smack
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#13
Report 6 years ago
#13
(Original post by james1211)
Nonsense, it happens and employers won't be sued for it because they can say they didn't hire them for a different reason, nobody can prove it. You're naive if you think this doesn't happen.
And you can't prove that it does happen. In engineering we're absolutely desperate for female engineers so to suggest such a thing is happening is absurd.
0
reply
ianlamb
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#14
Report 6 years ago
#14
Any decent company will not discriminate between male/female. Psycologicaly female's self asteam is a lot higher than a mans in later life. Any good employer knows this. Good luck in what ever you decide amd dont let amyone put you off.


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
sharp910sh
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#15
Report 6 years ago
#15
Loads lists. One line diagrams that is what you will be doing. They want more females.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Should there be a new university admissions system that ditches predicted grades?

No, I think predicted grades should still be used to make offers (706)
33.93%
Yes, I like the idea of applying to uni after I received my grades (PQA) (889)
42.72%
Yes, I like the idea of receiving offers only after I receive my grades (PQO) (393)
18.89%
I think there is a better option than the ones suggested (let us know in the thread!) (93)
4.47%

Watched Threads

View All