charlieejobson
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I'm in my final year at college studying a levels and only a few weeks ago it was discovered I have dyslexia. Whilst doing GCSE's I thought there could be something there but always believed my teachers at this top private school would pick up on it if there was.

Now I know I am for sure, my wording of sentences and how I phrase what I want to say (my main issue) is taking me even longer than before, could it be getting worse? Or is it because I know I am for sure? I'm forgetting how to spell really basic words too


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charlieejobson
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River85
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(Original post by charlieejobson)
I'm in my final year at college studying a levels and only a few weeks ago it was discovered I have dyslexia. Whilst doing GCSE's I thought there could be something there but always believed my teachers at this top private school would pick up on it if there was.

Now I know I am for sure, my wording of sentences and how I phrase what I want to say (my main issue) is taking me even longer than before, could it be getting worse? Or is it because I know I am for sure? I'm forgetting how to spell really basic words too

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Dyslexia is a neurological condition, a specific learning difficulty, rather than a mental health condition. So your thread has been moved to Disabled Students by another moderator.

But are you actually finding your mental health being affected?

As far as I'm aware, the short answer is no. Your cognitive abilities won't significantly change. At least not without reason (e.g. a brain injury). But then I'm not a Psychologist.

However, self-esteem is important. If you're starting to lack confidence and experience self-doubt this can have an effect. Also depression and stress can make concentration (and forming sentences, whether verbally or in writing) difficult for anyone.

Or, yes, it could be a case that you're fixating too much on the fact that you have dyslexia.

Some people also find that their difficulties become more pronounced in different educational settings, or at a higher academic level. This is one reason why a number of people get to university, or even well past university, until their dyslexia is diagnosed.

What sort of support are you receiving?
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charlieejobson
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Thank you. I don't think it can get worse either, presently not much.. I need to make use of my college's learning support department more.


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Folion
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What also might be happening is that as you go higher up in education the demands on your reading and writing abilities increase ie you need to be able to present your work in more eloquent and sophisticated ways.

Where you were able to cope well enough in lower school and get by the techniques you need at higher level are becoming more demanding and finding out your problems.

My son wasn't diagnosed as being dyslexic until he actually got to Uni but then a lot of help was available once diagnosed.
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charlieejobson
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(Original post by Folion)
What also might be happening is that as you go higher up in education the demands on your reading and writing abilities increase ie you need to be able to present your work in more eloquent and sophisticated ways.

Where you were able to cope well enough in lower school and get by the techniques you need at higher level are becoming more demanding and finding out your problems.

My son wasn't diagnosed as being dyslexic until he actually got to Uni but then a lot of help was available once diagnosed.
Yes I think that is the case. Of course and it really came apparent when writing my personal statement which I was trying to write perfectly!


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petertyerman
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i agree the disability(dyslexia) does not change. However as the level of academic work becomes harder the coping mechanisms you have developed over the years become less effective as the challenges are greater. It is often the case that the brighter dyslexics often the latest later to be diagnosed. One of the biggest difficulties is that if you manage to keep up with your peers, however much extra work having to do because of your disability, you will not recognise this and very often nor will your teachers. It is are sometimes only when the student becomes aware that they are having to do work harder to achieve the same results as their peers that the diagnosis is looked for.
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tinygirl96
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Hello

Not really. But as the level of work increases you might find it much harder to cope. And the coping techniques need to be adapted in order to keep up. There are lots of support groups out there with lots of helpful people willing to provide information and support too.
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CoochieMan
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Idk if I can read properly (ironic) but does that say 51 years ago??? And then bumped 6 years ago??? Lord-
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