r_u_jelly
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#1
I was interested in studying chemistry at degree level and was wandering to those of you who are at uni if you find it hard - to get 40% and also to get 60+ average do you need some natural ability or could someone with a B or C at chemistry A level achieve it if they put in a reasonable amount of work.

Do you have to learn tons of mechanisms and equations or is it more mathematical and more about application once you know the basic facts

Please let me know what it is like and also if you could mention which uni you attend would be helpful - I am interested in top 30 unis and RSC credited because I guess it looks better.

Also if you could tell me if the degree prospects good after grad or if you will be out of work for ages praying to get any form of job.

Thanks!
0
reply
alow
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#2
Report 6 years ago
#2
I doubt someone with a B or C in A Level Chemistry could do well at a top 30 uni. A Level Chem is very basic with barely any maths.
0
reply
r_u_jelly
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#3
(Original post by alow)
I doubt someone with a B or C in A Level Chemistry could do well at a top 30 uni. A Level Chem is very basic with barely any maths.
Maths A level isn't a requirement for a lot of the courses but I'm guessing it is a large step up to uni level
0
reply
alow
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#4
Report 6 years ago
#4
(Original post by r_u_jelly)
Maths A level isn't a requirement for a lot of the courses but I'm guessing it is a large step up to uni level
Yes, it would be.
0
reply
ThisIsOurDecision
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#5
Report 6 years ago
#5
(Original post by r_u_jelly)
Maths A level isn't a requirement for a lot of the courses but I'm guessing it is a large step up to uni level
If maths isn't a requirement then there will be a maths module to take in your first year to get you up to speed.
0
reply
WarriorLlama
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#6
Report 6 years ago
#6
(Original post by r_u_jelly)
I was interested in studying chemistry at degree level and was wandering to those of you who are at uni if you find it hard - to get 40% and also to get 60+ average do you need some natural ability or could someone with a B or C at chemistry A level achieve it if they put in a reasonable amount of work.

Do you have to learn tons of mechanisms and equations or is it more mathematical and more about application once you know the basic facts

Please let me know what it is like and also if you could mention which uni you attend would be helpful - I am interested in top 30 unis and RSC credited because I guess it looks better.

Also if you could tell me if the degree prospects good after grad or if you will be out of work for ages praying to get any form of job.

Thanks!
In my opinion, if you keep up with everything and you do the work you're given as best you can, then you will obtain a grade you'll be proud of. I wont lie - chemistry is hard work, but its great fun.

Even with B or C grades from A-level, I think you'll definitely be smart enough to pass, and with work, achieve over 60%, which is a 2.1.
And don't let lower grades worry you. You may not do so well in written exams, but a large percentage of the degree is practical lab work, which you may find you excel in.

There is some maths, but they often give A LOT of guidance. We are rarely tested on maths in exams (except very simple maths) and any complicated maths is examined via coursework. You can also avoid physical chemistry (the mathsy area) when you get to third year.
You do have to learn a lot of mechanisms for organic chemistry. Its horrific and it makes everyone want to cry. But it does get easier, I promise and there is a lot of support.

I attend Nottingham Uni and am a third year chemist. Its really fun and you learn so much. It is hard but totally worth it. There's a lot of work, but if you do it, you'll pass with a grade you'll be happy with.

And I hope there are jobs :P But if not, do a PhD!
Good luck!
0
reply
BJack
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#7
Report 6 years ago
#7
(Original post by WarriorLlama)
You do have to learn a lot of mechanisms for organic chemistry. Its horrific and it makes everyone want to cry. But it does get easier, I promise and there is a lot of support.
My experience in going from 100 reactions in first year to several hundred (ish) by the end of third year was not that it got easier....
0
reply
WarriorLlama
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#8
Report 6 years ago
#8
(Original post by BJack)
My experience in going from 100 reactions in first year to several hundred (ish) by the end of third year was not that it got easier....
I'd describe first year as building up a "toolbox" of essential mechanisms, and I've found the following two years we've built around those mechanisms and expanded from them. They are still complicated and hard to remember, but not as difficult as in first year when I hardly even knew how to push a curly arrow.
0
reply
r_u_jelly
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#9
(Original post by WarriorLlama)
I'd describe first year as building up a "toolbox" of essential mechanisms, and I've found the following two years we've built around those mechanisms and expanded from them. They are still complicated and hard to remember, but not as difficult as in first year when I hardly even knew how to push a curly arrow.
Thanks for the reply - was helpful. I was wandering how much work you put in per day in terms of hours in the library or if you mainly only work towards exam season!
0
reply
WarriorLlama
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#10
Report 6 years ago
#10
(Original post by r_u_jelly)
Thanks for the reply - was helpful. I was wandering how much work you put in per day in terms of hours in the library or if you mainly only work towards exam season!
Depends what's going on. I do all work I'm given and attend all lectures/tutorials/labs which takes up a lot of time as it is. Some weeks I have no extra work to do (like this week) so I end up doing literally nothing and just relaxing.) Other weeks I have coursework deadlines, lab reports due in and tutorial work to do. This can be very time demanding. So it varies every week from 3 hours to maximum hours (lectures, go home, eat, cycle back to library and work, cycle home, bed. wake up and repeat.)

Except doing tutorials, I don't spend much time (as I don't have enough to spare) on my modules and usually revise them over the holidays up until the exams. Like, every day until I understand the content, working at 1 module per day. Then past papers close to exam time.

A lot of people work less than me, but a lot of people work more. So its really a personal choice. I know I do enough to understand and survive the course.

Oh, and I'd say its labs that take up the most time. It takes ages to write up a decent lab report. Plus they are really tiring and the fumes make you smell weird for the rest of the day. And whatever you do, NEVER go out the night before labs. NEVER!!!!!!
0
reply
MIz90
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#11
Report 2 years ago
#11
(Original post by WarriorLlama)
In my opinion, if you keep up with everything and you do the work you're given as best you can, then you will obtain a grade you'll be proud of. I wont lie - chemistry is hard work, but its great fun.

Even with B or C grades from A-level, I think you'll definitely be smart enough to pass, and with work, achieve over 60%, which is a 2.1.
And don't let lower grades worry you. You may not do so well in written exams, but a large percentage of the degree is practical lab work, which you may find you excel in.

There is some maths, but they often give A LOT of guidance. We are rarely tested on maths in exams (except very simple maths) and any complicated maths is examined via coursework. You can also avoid physical chemistry (the mathsy area) when you get to third year.
You do have to learn a lot of mechanisms for organic chemistry. Its horrific and it makes everyone want to cry. But it does get easier, I promise and there is a lot of support.

I attend Nottingham Uni and am a third year chemist. Its really fun and you learn so much. It is hard but totally worth it. There's a lot of work, but if you do it, you'll pass with a grade you'll be happy with.

And I hope there are jobs :P But if not, do a PhD!
Good luck!
Uni of Nottingham or Nottingham trent?
0
reply
Azza124
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#12
Report 2 years ago
#12
I graduated from University of Nottingham with a 1st on an integrated Chemistry masters course and I got BBC in my A levels! (Maths, Chemistry, Physics). It does require some good amount of work to get there but I promise you that is perfectly attainable!

In terms of maths, at UoN there was a module for people who didnt do a level maths or just sucked at it to bring everyone to the same level by the end of the 1st year.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Should there be a new university admissions system that ditches predicted grades?

No, I think predicted grades should still be used to make offers (509)
33.64%
Yes, I like the idea of applying to uni after I received my grades (PQA) (627)
41.44%
Yes, I like the idea of receiving offers only after I receive my grades (PQO) (308)
20.36%
I think there is a better option than the ones suggested (let us know in the thread!) (69)
4.56%

Watched Threads

View All